Special Issue "Advancing in Tobacco Control and Public Health Policy amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Communication and Informatics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sungkyu Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Graduate School of Public Health, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, 03722 Seoul, Korea
2. Korea Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, 7 Nonhyeon-ro 98-gil, Gangnam-gu, 06136 Seoul, Korea
3. Korean Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, 14 Gwanpyeong-ro 176beon-gil, Dongan-gu, 14066 Anyang-si, Korea
Interests: tobacco control policy; tobacco industry interference; global public health
Prof. Dr. Yu Jin Paek
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Smoking Cessation Clinic & Department of Family Medicine Health Promotion Center, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, 14 Gwanpyeong-ro 176beon-gil, Dongan-gu, 14066 Anyang-si, Korea
2. Korean Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, 14 Gwanpyeong-ro 176beon-gil, Dongan-gu, 14066 Anyang-si, Korea
Interests: tobacco dependence treatment; tobacco control policy; health risk appraisal
Dr. Jinyoung Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Korea Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, 7 Nonhyeon-ro 98-gil, Gangnam-gu, 06136 Seoul, Korea
2. Korean Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, 14 Gwanpyeong-ro 176beon-gil, Dongan-gu, 14066 Anyang-si, Korea
Interests: health education; smoking prevention program, tobacco control policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tobacco use may increase the risk of being infected with COVID-19, increase the chances of complications, and also increase the probability of its spread. Despite the difficult circumstances the world is currently facing, tobacco control initiatives should still continue to advance. Tobacco users have heard of the impact of smoking in terms of the increased severity of illness, and smoking is associated with severe clinical outcomes for people with other types of coronavirus, including the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the behavioural change among tobacco users. For example, in the UK, a million people have stopped smoking since the COVID-19 pandemic hit Britain, and a further 440,000 UK smokers tried to quit during the early stages of the pandemic. COVID-19 is also affecting the reinforcement of tobacco control policies around the globe. In India, sales of tobacco products were banned when the country went into lockdown in April 2020, and the country required people to refrain from consuming smokeless tobacco products in public places to prevent the spread of COVID-19. On the other hand, in countries like the Republic of Korea, the national smoking cessation service and tobacco control policies have weakened following the outbreak of COVID-19. The country’s 254 public health centres providing the national smoking cessation service came to a standstill following the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, the planned tobacco control policy was delayed due to the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, the rigid enforcement of regulations on tobacco advertising in tobacco retail shops and convenience stores were delayed because the retailers claimed they had suffered too much with COVID-19. Papers addressing any topics related to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on tobacco control and public health policies; smoking cessation services; behavioural change among tobacco users; tobacco industry activities; tobacco products; etc. are invited for this Special Issue. The Issue will provide discussion on how to advance tobacco control policy and services based on the various case studies, and suggest ways to protect people from tobacco when we are facing a new pandemic similar to COVID-19. 

Disclaimer: We will not accept research funded in part or full by any tobacco companies in this Special Issue. For more details, please check: https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/1660-4601/15/12/2831/htm.

Dr. Sungkyu Lee
Prof. Dr. Yu Jin Paek
Dr. Jinyoung Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • tobacco
  • tobacco industry
  • policy
  • nicotine
  • e-cigarettes
  • vaping
  • novel tobacco products
  • smoking cessation service
  • perception

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Effectiveness of National Residential Smoking Cessation Program
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9901; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18189901 - 20 Sep 2021
Viewed by 264
Abstract
We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of the Korean national five-day residential smoking cessation program and the factors affecting the long-term smoking cessation of participants. The residential smoking cessation program (2017–2018) recruited smokers with a smoking duration ≥ 20 years and who have [...] Read more.
We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of the Korean national five-day residential smoking cessation program and the factors affecting the long-term smoking cessation of participants. The residential smoking cessation program (2017–2018) recruited smokers with a smoking duration ≥ 20 years and who have attempted to quit smoking more than twice and/or smokers with chronic morbidities. Participants underwent an intensive intervention, including individual psychological therapy, group therapy, medical counseling, and pharmacotherapy. The 6-month continuous abstinence rate (CAR) was assessed via self-reports, the urine cotinine levels, and/or expired-air carbon monoxide levels. Logistic regression was used to analyze the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) to assess factors related to smoking cessation. Overall, 484 participants who completed the residential program and questionnaire were evaluated. The 3- and 6-month CAR were 81.82% and 63.22%, respectively. The aOR of 6-month continuous abstinence was lower among participants with severe nicotine dependence (aOR: 0.46, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.26–0.81) and higher among participants with combination therapy of varenicline with short-term nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) (aOR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.07–2.51), with higher self-efficacy (aOR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.15–3.37). The residential smoking cessation program was effective. High self-efficacy, combination therapy of varenicline with short-term NRT, and low nicotine dependence were associated with a high 6-month CAR. Full article
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