Special Issue "Comprehensive Back Health Education: Teaching and Learning"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Manuel Monfort-Pañego
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Body Languages Didactics Department, Teacher Training Faculty, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Interests: teacher training; teacher professional development; physical education; back health education; knowledge; habits
Prof. Dr. Vicente Miñana-Signes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Body Languages Didactics Department, Teacher Training Faculty, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Interests: educational models; physical education; knowledge; postural habits; back health education; primary school; secondary school

Special Issue Information

During the second half of the 20th century, nonspecific low back pain (LBP) became one of the biggest problems for public health systems in the western world and now it seems to have spread throughout the world.

The monumental impact of musculoskeletal conditions was recognized by the United Nations, the World Health Organization, the World Bank, and numerous governments around the world through support for the Bone and Joint Decade initiative (2000 to 2010.)

The European Union has developed policies to promote action research in this field. Through "COST Action B13," a guide has been developed that gathers and organizes the scientific evidence on this issue. It aims to develop an effective intervention for the prevention of this problem, and to mark the direction of future research lines.

Currently, it is known that the prevalence of back problems at school age is high, and therefore deserves a more exhaustive study. The European guidelines for LBP prevention based on scientific studies and recent review studies conclude that there is insufficient evidence to recommend a generalized educational intervention in school-age children, but state that development of preventive programs and risk factor modification would be a positive move. So, we can say that there is a wide consensus on the need to address back health problems at early ages from an educational context. Comprehensive back health education interventions should focus on improving back health awareness and developing healthy habits through motivating activities.

The comprehensive back health education interventions should focus on improving back health awareness and develop healthy habits through motivating activities.

This Special Issue aims to show an analysis of the current state of educational interventions for the care and improvement of back health. In addition, it seeks to select the most important research studies on interventions under development, to point out the most effective models and methodological strategies in diverse educational contexts, as well as to point out the needs, challenges and future lines of research.

In this Special Issue, we invite you to share your work on back health education in children and adolescents. We would also be very interested in proposals like:

  1. The transfer of scientific knowledge to education: evidence for back health education.
  2. Back health in physical literacy.
  3. Educational models in back health education.
  4. Systematic reviews of interventions in back health education.
  5. Measuring instruments for the development of back health education in educational contexts.
  6. The current state of teacher training for the development of interventions for back health education: knowledge of the content and didactic knowledge of the content.
  7. The current state of knowledge and habits of the school population (primary and secondary) about back health.
  8. Education for back health: an intervention based on comprehensive models.
  9. Evidence of the implications of back health education on back health: a longitudinal study.
  10. Challenges for research in back health education in the 21st century.

Dr. Manuel Monfort-Pañego
Prof. Dr. Vicente Miñana-Signes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • teaching educational models problem-based learning service-learning learning community interdisciplinary socio-ecological model methodology didactic resources physical education knowledge postural habits questionnaires reliability and validity back health education nonspecific low back pain primary school secondary school long live education

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Reliability of the Back Pain and Body Posture Evaluation Instrument (BackPEI) to the Spanish Adolescent Population
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 854; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18030854 - 20 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 727
Abstract
The prevalence of back pain (BP) among children and adolescents has increased over recent years. Some authors advocate promoting back-health education in the school setting. It is therefore important to adopt a uniform suite of assessment instruments to measure the various constructs. The [...] Read more.
The prevalence of back pain (BP) among children and adolescents has increased over recent years. Some authors advocate promoting back-health education in the school setting. It is therefore important to adopt a uniform suite of assessment instruments to measure the various constructs. The present study aimed to perform a cultural adaptation of a validated measurement instrument (BackPEI), beginning with a translation and cultural adaptation phase, followed by a second phase to test reliability using a test-retest design. The translation and cross-cultural adaptation were performed based on the guidelines. Reliability was tested by applying the questionnaire to 224 secondary school students, at two different times with a 7-day interval between the tests. In general, the Spanish version presented adequate agreement for questions 1–20, with only question 9 achieving a low Kappa range of 0.312 (−0.152–0.189). The question about pain intensity did not show differences between the test means (4.72 ± 2.33) and re-test (4.58 ± 2.37) (p = 0.333), and the responses for these two tests obtained a high correlation (ICC = 0.951 (0.928–0.966); p = 0.0001). Psychometric testing indicated that the Spanish version of the BackPEI is well-adapted and reliable, based on the test–retest design, providing similar results to the original Brazilian version. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Comprehensive Back Health Education: Teaching and Learning)

Review

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Review
Teaching Back Health in the School Setting: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 979; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18030979 - 22 Jan 2021
Viewed by 765
Abstract
School-based interventions have reported effectiveness on back health; however, there are no specific guidelines for teaching body mechanics and posture in primary and secondary schools. To identify, describe, and analyze the educative features of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on back health developed to [...] Read more.
School-based interventions have reported effectiveness on back health; however, there are no specific guidelines for teaching body mechanics and posture in primary and secondary schools. To identify, describe, and analyze the educative features of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on back health developed to date in the school setting, a systematic review was performed following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. RCTs exclusively focused on educational setting electronic databases included PubMed, EMBASE, PEDro, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, ERIC, and MEDLINE on the Ovid platform. Databases were searched for potentially eligible studies from the earliest date up to 18th March 2020. A total of 584 records were obtained from the database searches. A total of six articles that applied inclusion criteria were assessed for eligibility. All of these studies found improvements in postural habits and the level of knowledge with regard to back health, as well as a reduction in the prevalence of back pain. None of the studies used the student-centered method, and three studies used evaluation instruments with a pilot validation. Research on RCT interventions concerning back health in the school setting is scarce. None of the interventions applied a constructivist or student-centered method. The use of validated and standardized assessment instruments is required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Comprehensive Back Health Education: Teaching and Learning)
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