Special Issue "COVID-19 on Exercise and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

COVID-19 influences all domains of human activity since 2020, including physical activity and health. In addition to the direct impact of COVID-19 on physical and mental health outcomes, changes in physical activity may also further influence this negative impact. So far, preliminary studies have shown both quantitative and qualitative changes in physical activity. It has been observed that physical activity decreases during this period, whereas there is a swift from moderate-to-high intensity physical activity to lower intensity physical activity such as walking.

“COVID-19 on Exercise and Health” focuses on the current state of knowledge on the links among exercise, health, and COVID-19. Original research papers, systematic and narrative reviews, and case reports are welcome to this issue. Other manuscript types accepted include methodological papers, position papers, brief reports, and commentaries. Manuscripts from different disciplines including medicine, nutrition, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, psychology, and sports science are expected to provide insights on the way exercise and health aspects change during COVID-19.

Dr. Pantelis T. Nikolaidis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • activities of daily living
  • aerobic capacity
  • age groups
  • body composition
  • elderly
  • flexibility
  • muscle strength
  • nutrition
  • physical activity
  • physical fitness
  • psychology
  • quarantine
  • sedentarism
  • sex
  • weight

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Physical Activity, Mental Health and Wellbeing during the First COVID-19 Containment in New Zealand: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(22), 12036; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182212036 - 16 Nov 2021
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Abstract
Strategies implemented worldwide to contain COVID-19 outbreaks varied in severity across different countries, and established a new normal for work and school life (i.e., from home) for many people, reducing opportunities for physical activity. Positive relationships of physical activity with both mental and [...] Read more.
Strategies implemented worldwide to contain COVID-19 outbreaks varied in severity across different countries, and established a new normal for work and school life (i.e., from home) for many people, reducing opportunities for physical activity. Positive relationships of physical activity with both mental and physical health are well recognised, and therefore the aim was to ascertain how New Zealand’s lockdown restrictions impacted physical activity, mental health and wellbeing. Participants (n = 4007; mean ± SD: age 46.5 ± 14.7 years, 72% female, 80.7% New Zealand European) completed (10–26 April 2020) an online amalgamated survey (Qualtrics): International Physical Activity Questionnaire: Short Form; Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-9; World Health Organisation-Five Well-Being Index; Stages of Change Scale. Positive dose–response relationships between physical activity levels and wellbeing scores were demonstrated for estimates that were unadjusted (moderate activity OR 3.79, CI 2.88–4.92; high activity OR 8.04, CI 6.07–10.7) and adjusted (confounding variables: age, gender, socioeconomic status, time sitting and co-morbidities) (moderate activity 1.57, CI 1.11–2.52; high activity 2.85, CI 1.97–4.14). The study results support previous research demonstrating beneficial effects of regular physical activity on mental health and wellbeing. Governments may use these results to promote meeting physical activity guidelines in order to protect mental health and wellbeing during the ongoing COVID-19 restrictions and future pandemics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19 on Exercise and Health)

Review

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Review
Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Sedentary Time and Behaviour in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11286; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111286 - 27 Oct 2021
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Abstract
The aim of this meta-analysis was to quantify the change in sedentary time during the COVID-19 pandemic and its effect on health outcomes in the general population. One thousand six hundred and one articles published after 2019 were retrieved from five databases, of [...] Read more.
The aim of this meta-analysis was to quantify the change in sedentary time during the COVID-19 pandemic and its effect on health outcomes in the general population. One thousand six hundred and one articles published after 2019 were retrieved from five databases, of which 64 and 40 were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis, respectively. Studies were grouped according to population: children (<18 years), adults (18–64 years) and older adults (>65 years). Average sedentary time was calculated, with sub-analyses performed by country, behaviour type and health outcomes. Children were most affected, increasing their sedentary time by 159.5 ± 142.6 min day−1, followed by adults (+126.9 ± 42.2 min day−1) and older adults (+46.9 ± 22.0 min day−1). There were no sex differences in any age group. Screen time was the only consistently measured behaviour and accounted for 46.8% and 57.2% of total sedentary time in children and adults, respectively. Increases in sedentary time were negatively correlated with global mental health, depression, anxiety and quality of life, irrespective of age. Whilst lockdown negatively affected all age groups, children were more negatively affected than adults or older adults, highlighting this population as a key intervention target. As lockdowns ease worldwide, strategies should be employed to reduce time spent sedentary. Trial registration: PROSPERO (CRD42020208909). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19 on Exercise and Health)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Recommendations for exercise in people with dementia during COVID-19
Name: Pantelis T. Nikolaidis
Affiliation: School of Health and Caring Sciences, University of West Attica, Athens 12243, Greece
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