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Special Issue "Cancer Surveillance and Intelligence: Use in Health Services Research and Policy"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Lorraine Shack
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Cancer Control Alberta, Alberta Health Services, 2210 2nd Street Calgary, Alberta, Canada
2. Department of Oncology, and Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Interests: cancer surveillance; outcomes; survival; epidemiology; regional comparisons; linked data; performance measures; health services assessment; health policy
Dr. Winson Cheung
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
2. Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Interests: cancer surveillance; outcomes; survival; epidemiology; regional comparisons; linked data; performance measures; health services assessment; health policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The impact of cancer in the developed world is enormous. Nearly everyone will be impacted through their own diagnosis and treatment or a family member’s diagnosis. Cancer surveillance using registry data is a fundamental approach to monitor the cancer burden and its changing impacts. Data linkage of registry data to other sources of data such as treatment, recurrence, clinical trials, supportive care, and end of life care expands use of registry data and improves completeness for studies along the continuum of care.

With the implementation of clinical information systems, a wealth of clinical information is now collected, and linkage to the cancer registry can identify population-based cohorts for specific studies. Furthermore, advances in translational and interpretive software can enable information to be obtained from text or verbal dictation for research. The linkage of such information to cancer registry data can provide novel and innovative findings, thereby dramatically expanding the functionality of surveillance data.

This Special Issue seeks research papers on cancer surveillance and analysis utilizing the cancer registry data linked to other sources. Studies may focus on innovative application of cancer registry data throughout the patient treatment continuum in the areas of epidemiology, survival and outcomes, performance measures, and health service assessment.

We welcome original papers, as well as systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

Dr. Lorraine Shack
Dr. Winson Cheung
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Surveillance
  • Cancer outcomes and survival
  • Epidemiology
  • Health services assessment
  • Translational language software
  • Data linkage
  • Novel use of cancer registry
  • Data implementation
  • Evaluation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Cohort Study of Antihyperglycemic Medication and Pancreatic Cancer Patients Survival
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6016; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17176016 - 19 Aug 2020
Viewed by 754
Abstract
Background: We assessed the association between the use of metformin and other antihyperglycemic medications on overall survival in diabetic patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods: Patients with pancreatic cancer and diabetes between 2000 and 2015 were identified from the Lithuanian Cancer Registry and the [...] Read more.
Background: We assessed the association between the use of metformin and other antihyperglycemic medications on overall survival in diabetic patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods: Patients with pancreatic cancer and diabetes between 2000 and 2015 were identified from the Lithuanian Cancer Registry and the National Health Insurance Fund database. Cohort members were classified into six groups according to type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment: sulfonylurea monotherapy; metformin monotherapy; insulin monotherapy; metformin and sulfonylurea combination; metformin and other antihyperglycemic medications; all other combinations of oral antihyperglycemic medications. Survival was calculated from the date of cancer diagnosis to the date of death or the end of follow-up (31 December 2018). Results: Study group included 454 diabetic patients with pancreatic cancer. We found no statistically significant differences in overall survival between patients by glucose-lowering therapy. However, highest mortality risk was observed in patients on insulin monotherapy, and better survival was observed in the groups of patients using antihyperglycemic medication combinations, metformin alone, and metformin in combination with sulfonylurea. Analysis by cumulative dose of metformin showed significantly lower mortality risk in the highest cumulative dose category (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.58–0.99). Conclusions: Our study showed that metformin might have a survival benefit for pancreatic cancer patients, suggesting a potentially available option for the treatment. Full article
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Brief Report
Incidence of Pregnancy-Associated Cancer in Two Canadian Provinces: A Population-Based Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3100; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063100 - 17 Mar 2021
Viewed by 599
Abstract
Pregnancy-associated cancer—that is diagnosed in pregnancy or within 365 days after delivery—is increasingly common as cancer therapy evolves and survivorship increases. This study assessed the incidence and temporal trends of pregnancy-associated cancer in Alberta and Ontario—together accounting for 50% of Canada’s entire population. [...] Read more.
Pregnancy-associated cancer—that is diagnosed in pregnancy or within 365 days after delivery—is increasingly common as cancer therapy evolves and survivorship increases. This study assessed the incidence and temporal trends of pregnancy-associated cancer in Alberta and Ontario—together accounting for 50% of Canada’s entire population. Linked data from the two provincial cancer registries and health administrative data were used to ascertain new diagnoses of cancer, livebirths, stillbirths and induced abortions among women aged 18–50 years, from 2003 to 2015. The annual crude incidence rate (IR) was calculated as the number of women with a pregnancy-associated cancer per 100,000 deliveries. A nonparametric test for trend assessed for any temporal trends. In Alberta, the crude IR of pregnancy-associated cancer was 156.2 per 100,000 deliveries (95% CI 145.8–166.7), and in Ontario, the IR was 149.4 per 100,000 deliveries (95% CI 143.3–155.4). While no statistically significant temporal trend in the IR of pregnancy-associated cancer was seen in Alberta, there was a rise in Ontario (p = 0.01). Pregnancy-associated cancer is common enough to warrant more detailed research on maternal, pregnancy and child outcomes, especially as cancer therapies continue to evolve. Full article
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