Special Issue "Chronic Disease, Disability, and Community Care"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Darcy McMaughan
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Guest Editor
School of Community Health Sciences Counseling and Counseling Psychology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA
Interests: disability; health services; community engagement; community-based care; community-integrated care
Dr. Idethia Harvey
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Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Health & Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Interests: ethnic minority populations; chronic disease management; health disparities
Dr. Kevin Tarlow
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Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Hampton University, Hampton, VA 23669, USA
Interests: mental health disparities; telehealth; single-case research methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As life expectancy increases across the globe, so increases the predicted number of years spent living with chronic disease and disability. Following the World Health Organization's lead and in line with the social model of disability, this Special Issue defines disability in the broadest sense to cover physical, cognitive, psychological, and emotional impairments; activity limitations; and participation restrictions due to the complex interaction of the person and the environment. Chronic diseases, which can overlap with disability, are health conditions that last one year or more and necessitate continued health care or lead to functional impairment. The aging of populations, coupled with increased longevity for persons with disabilities and persons living with chronic disease and policies aimed at minimizing institutionalization (due to concerns about escalating costs and poor quality of care), have contributed to a growing demand for a wide range of home- and community-based programs (HCBPs) and community-integrated care models. HCBPS  are person-centered services designed to deliver care for special populations with complex and chronic health conditions in the home and community. These special populations include but are not limited to: frail older adults, people living with chronic disease, people living with disabilities, children with special health care needs, people living with chronic mental health conditions, and people living with chronic pain. Community-integrated care models are varied but focus on aligning clinical, community, and public health strategies to promote health and mitigate disease. The  main goal of this Special Issue is to inform health policy, community health,  public health programs, and safety-net hospitals on care for people with disabilities and chronic disease in the community, with an emphasis on promoting health equity and justice. This can include scholarly work on historically understudied and underserved populations and how they experience disability and chronic disease; their community-based care needs; outcomes of interventions, programs, service-learning or community-engaged research affecting these populations; and accessibility of care. We encourage a variety of knowledge-producing approaches, such as ethnographies, rigorous systematic and scoping reviews of the literature, case studies, quasi-experimental and experimental designs, and studies using grounded theory.

Dr. Darcy McMaughan
Dr. Idethia Harvey
Dr. Kevin Tarlow
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Nurse-Led Education Program for Pneumoconiosis Caregivers at the Community Level
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1092; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18031092 - 26 Jan 2021
Viewed by 775
Abstract
Pneumoconiosis is an irreversible chronic disease. With functional limitations and an inability to work, pneumoconiosis patients require support from family caregivers. However, the needs of pneumoconiosis caregivers have been neglected. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a nurse-led education program, which [...] Read more.
Pneumoconiosis is an irreversible chronic disease. With functional limitations and an inability to work, pneumoconiosis patients require support from family caregivers. However, the needs of pneumoconiosis caregivers have been neglected. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a nurse-led education program, which involved four weekly 90-min workshops led by an experienced nurse and guided by Orem’s self-care deficit theory. A single-group, repeated-measure study design was adopted. Caregivers’ mental health (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS, four single items for stress, worriedness, tiredness, and insufficient support), caregiving burdens (caregiving burden scale, CBS), and unmet direct support and enabling needs (Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool, CSNAT) were measured at the baseline (T0), immediately after (T1), and one month after intervention (T2); 49, 41, and 28 female participants completed the T0, T1, and T2 measurements. Mean age was 65.9 years old (SD 10.08) with a range between 37 and 85 years old. The program improved the caregivers’ mental wellbeing, and reduced their caregiving burdens and their unmet support and enabling needs, both immediately (T1) and one-month after the intervention (T2). In particular, the intervention improved the caregivers’ mental wellbeing significantly, specifically depression symptoms, stress, and tiredness immediately after the intervention; and reduced most of their unmet support needs and unmet enabling needs one-month after the intervention. This was the first nurse-led program for pneumoconiosis caregivers and should serve as a foundation for further studies to test the program with robust designs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Disease, Disability, and Community Care)
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Article
Influence of Living Alone or with a Spouse Only on the Short-Term Prognosis in Patients after an Acute Ischemic Stroke
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8223; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218223 - 06 Nov 2020
Viewed by 636
Abstract
Background—This study aimed to explore whether living alone or with a spouse only affects the short-term prognosis of acute ischemic stroke patients. Methods—We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke from April 2014 to February 2019 [...] Read more.
Background—This study aimed to explore whether living alone or with a spouse only affects the short-term prognosis of acute ischemic stroke patients. Methods—We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke from April 2014 to February 2019 in Japan. The primary outcome was defined as worsening by at least one grade on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). The secondary outcome was set as the degree of worsening on the mRS. The outcomes were compared between three groups of patients: (1) those living alone (ALONE), (2) those living with their spouse only (SPOUSE), and (3) OTHERs. Results—In total, 365 patients were included in this study: 111 (30%) ALONE, 133 (36%) SPOUSE, and 121 (33%) OTHERs. Cardiogenic embolisms were observed more frequently in ALONE than in OTHERs. The primary outcome occurred in 88 (79.3%) patients in ALONE and in 96 (72.2%) patients in SPOUSE, both of which were higher than the 72 (59.5%) in OTHERs. After adjusting with 19 variables, the risk of worsening was higher in ALONE (odds ratio (OR): 2.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.50–5.58) and SPOUSE (OR: 1.83, 95% CI: 1.00–3.33) compared with OTHERs. Conclusions—In patients with acute ischemic stroke, not only living alone but also living with a spouse only may be associated with a worse short-term prognosis, independent of other cardiovascular risks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Disease, Disability, and Community Care)
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