Special Issue "Chronic Disease Epidemiology: Advances in Research and Methods"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ahmed A. Arif
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223, USA
Interests: chronic disease epidemiology; occupational epidemiology; spatial epidemiology; rare and orphan diseases
Dr. Rajib Paul
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223, USA
Interests: bayesian methods; biostatistics; spatio-temporal analysis; social epidemiology; diabetes; and infectious diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Globally, chronic diseases such as cancer, heart diseases, respiratory diseases, and diabetes are rising. This trend has strained healthcare resources in both resource-rich and resource-poor countries. The control of infectious diseases through public health and medical interventions has increased life expectancy in most countries. However, most middle-to-low-income countries experience a poor quality of life. In high-income countries such as the U.S., life expectancy has been stagnant for the past several years. According to the Global Burden of Disease report, a sharp increase in obesity in adults might be fueling the rise in diabetes and heart disease globally. In the older age group, 63% of the global burden of respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are shared by low-to-middle income countries, likely due to exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollution. The coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) global pandemic has affected disproportionally those with underlying chronic health conditions (comorbidities). It is still unknown what the long-term health consequences might be for those who recovered from the Covid-19 infection or had an asymptomatic infection.

For this Special Issue, we welcome original articles and reviews on epidemiological research and/or methods focusing on chronic diseases. Research articles based on primary or secondary data focusing on social determinants of health, access to care, interventions, longitudinal studies, and risk factors of chronic diseases are encouraged. This Special Issue will also consider articles on the impact of chronic health conditions on Covid-19 severity. Epidemiological methods based on spatiotemporal analyses, Bayesian methods, multilevel modeling, time series analysis, or causal inference using theoretical or empirical approaches are also of interest. Research-to-practice articles highlighting the successful implementation of evidence-based research will also be considered.

Prof. Dr. Ahmed A. Arif
Dr. Rajib Paul
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic disease epidemiology
  • heart disease
  • cancer
  • COPD
  • diabetes
  • interventions
  • social determinants of health
  • access to care
  • epidemiologic methods
  • spatiotemporal analysis
  • Bayesian methods
  • multilevel modeling
  • time series analysis
  • evidence-based research
  • obesity
  • comorbidities
  • longitudinal
  • Covid-19 severity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Related to Coffee Consumption in Korea? A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Observational Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7880; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157880 - 25 Jul 2021
Viewed by 480
Abstract
Coffee consumption is gradually increasing in Korea. As a result, interest in the relationship between coffee consumption and various diseases is growing. Several factors affect the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and coffee consumption may be related. We conducted a nationwide cross-sectional study [...] Read more.
Coffee consumption is gradually increasing in Korea. As a result, interest in the relationship between coffee consumption and various diseases is growing. Several factors affect the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and coffee consumption may be related. We conducted a nationwide cross-sectional study using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2012–2016). A total of 12,465 eligible participants (4819 men and 7646 women) were included in the study. Participants with RA were defined as those who were diagnosed and currently being treated by physicians. Daily coffee consumption amounts were categorized as none, <1 cup, 1–2 cups, 2–3 cups, and ≥3 cups a day based on a self-report. A multivariable logistic regression model was employed, and we calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the odds of participants having RA with respect to coffee consumption. Compared to the no-coffee group, the ORs for RA in the <1 cup and 1–2 cups groups were 2.99 (95% CI 0.33–27.28) and 2.63 (95% CI 0.31–22.63) in men, respectively, and the ORs for RA for women in the <1 cup, 1–2 cups, 2–3 cups, and ≥3 cups groups were 0.62 (95% CI 0.31–1.26), 0.67 (95% CI 0.33–1.37), 1.08 (95% CI 0.35–3.36), and 1.43 (95% CI 0.25–8.36), respectively. Our study concludes, therefore, that daily coffee consumption is not related to the prevalence of RA in the general Korean population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Disease Epidemiology: Advances in Research and Methods)
Article
Psychological State after an Acute Coronary Syndrome: Impact of Physical Limitations
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6473; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126473 - 15 Jun 2021
Viewed by 521
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate how physical limitations after ACS influence patients’ quality of life and health perception. This was a longitudinal clinical study. We recruited 146 patients diagnosed with ACS. The patients performed a stress test (Bruce’s protocol) for [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate how physical limitations after ACS influence patients’ quality of life and health perception. This was a longitudinal clinical study. We recruited 146 patients diagnosed with ACS. The patients performed a stress test (Bruce’s protocol) for the evaluation of physical limitations and were classified according to the test result: without physical limitations (more than 10 METS), with some physical limitations (7 to 9 METS), and with high physical limitations (less than 6 METS). Significant differences were found between the three groups immediately after the diagnosis of ACS and after a period of three months, regarding health perception, anxiety, depression, sexual relationships, distress, and adjustment to disease. These differences resulted larger between the group with less limitations and the group with higher limitations. After 3 months, however, there was an overall improvement in all variables. In conclusion, physical limitations after ACS seem to influence perceived quality of life determined by measuring general health, vitality, total adaptation, emotional role, social adaptation, depression, and anxiety. Therefore, the highest the physical limitations, the poorer the psychological conditions and vice versa, even 3 months after ACS diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Disease Epidemiology: Advances in Research and Methods)
Article
Occupational Disease as the Bane of Workers’ Lives: A Chronological Review of the Literature and Study of Its Development in Slovakia. Part 1
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5910; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115910 - 31 May 2021
Viewed by 678
Abstract
This article not only offers a chronological overview of the development of occupational medicine, but also offers a summary of occupational diseases recommended by the ILO and legislative decisions that have influenced how we approach assessment today. We consider that these areas form [...] Read more.
This article not only offers a chronological overview of the development of occupational medicine, but also offers a summary of occupational diseases recommended by the ILO and legislative decisions that have influenced how we approach assessment today. We consider that these areas form a whole in which they cannot function without each other and they would lose their relevance if the system was collapsed. By excluding even one part of it, we would find ourselves at the beginning of the era of occupational medicine, and a large number of employees would once again be exposed to conditions that previously led to considerable illness and mortality of employees. The article also examines legislation and the development of occupational diseases in Slovakia in the period 1997–2019. Using basic statistical methods and time series, a trend model for the time series of the development of the number of occupational diseases over the last 20 years is created. The modeling also includes a forecast for the development of the number of occupational diseases for the next 5 years. The model created shows a favorable, decreasing trend in the number of occupational diseases in Slovakia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Disease Epidemiology: Advances in Research and Methods)
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