Special Issue "Chronic Diseases: Biopsychosocial Impact, Interventions and Preventive Measures"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ana Isabel Cobo-Cuenca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Fisioterapia y Enfermería y Fisioterapia de Toledo, Universidad de Castilla la Mancha, 45005 Toledo, Spain
Interests: preventive activities and public health; physical activity and health; nursing care; women and health; quality of life; sexuality; mood; chronic diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Juan Manuel Carmona-Torres
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Fisioterapia y Enfermería, Grupo IMCU, Universidad de Castilla la Mancha (UCLM), 45071 Toledo, Spain
Interests: ageing; older people; nursing; nursing care; polypharmacy; preventive activities and public health; physical activity and health; violence; elder abuse
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Diana Patricia Pozuelo-Carrascosa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Social and Health Care Research Center, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 16071 Cuenca, Spain
Interests: physical activity; body composition analysis; body composition; childhood obesity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. José Alberto Laredo-Aguilera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Fisioterapia y Enfermería, Grupo IMCU, Universidad de Castilla la Mancha (UCLM), 45071 Toledo, Spain
Interests: older people; nursing; physical activity; body composition; childhood obesity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Pedro Ángel Latorre Román
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Didáctica de la Expresión Musical, Plástica y Corporal, University of Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas, s/n, 23071 Jaen, Spain
Interests: body bomposition; physical activity; exercise science; physical activity assessment; physical fitness;
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In addition, due to the physical effect they produce, chronic diseases also have a strong psychosocial impact on both the sufferer and his or her family members. These diseases can affect mood, quality of life, sexuality, self-esteem, interpersonal relationships, etc. Thus, it is important to establish interventions both to prevent and diagnose these diseases early and to establish care that can improve the quality of life, sexuality, moods, etc. of the people who suffer from them.

This Special Issue, entitled “Chronic Diseases: Biopsychosocial Impact, Interventions and Preventive Measures” seeks papers on new research aimed at preventing chronic diseases and identifying problems related to them and interventions to improve the health status of people who suffer from them. We also welcome high-quality systematic reviews related to these issues.

Prof. Dr. Ana Isabel Cobo-Cuenca
Prof. Dr. Juan Manuel Carmona-Torres
Prof. Dr. Diana Patricia Pozuelo-Carrascosa
Dr. José Alberto Laredo-Aguilera
Prof. Dr. Pedro Ángel Latorre Román
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Cancer
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Chronic diseases
  • Quality of life
  • Mental health
  • Mood
  • Physical activity
  • Physical and mental health
  • Programming effects
  • Sexuality
  • Social support

Published Papers (12 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Influence of Tunneled Hemodialysis-Catheters on Inflammation and Mortality in Dialyzed Patients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7605; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147605 - 16 Jul 2021
Viewed by 572
Abstract
Older age and comorbidities in hemodialysis patients determines the use of tunneled catheters as vascular access despite their reported clinical and mortality disadvantages. This prospective matched study analyzes the impact of permanent catheters on inflammation and mortality in hemodialysis patients; We studied 108 [...] Read more.
Older age and comorbidities in hemodialysis patients determines the use of tunneled catheters as vascular access despite their reported clinical and mortality disadvantages. This prospective matched study analyzes the impact of permanent catheters on inflammation and mortality in hemodialysis patients; We studied 108 patients, 54 with AV-fistula (AVF) and 54 with indwelling hemodialysis catheters (HDC) matched by sex, age, diabetes and time under renal-replacement therapy comparing dialysis efficacy, inflammation and micro-inflammation parameters as well as mortality. Cox-regression analysis was applied to determine predictors of mortality, HDC patients presented higher C-reactive-protein (CRP) blood levels and percentage of pro-inflammatory lymphocytes CD14+/CD16+ with worse dialysis-efficacy parameters. Thirty-six-months mortality appeared higher in the HDC group although statistical significance was not reached. Age with a Hazard Ratio (HR) = 1.06, hypoalbuminemia (HR = 0.43), hypophosphatemia (HR = 0.75) and the increase in CD14+/CD16+ monocyte count (HR = 1.02) were predictors of mortality; elder patients dialyzing through HDC show increased inflammation parameters as compared with nAVF bearing patients, although they do not present a significant increase in mortality when matched by covariates. Increasing age and percentage of pro-inflammatory monocytes as well as decreased phosphate and serum-albumin were predictors of mortality and indicate the main conclusions or interpretations. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Patient Activation, Depressive Symptoms, and Self-Rated Health: Care Management Intervention Effects among High-Need, Medically Complex Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5690; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115690 - 26 May 2021
Viewed by 523
Abstract
The purpose of this randomized controlled trial (n = 268) at a Federally Qualified Health Center was to evaluate the outcomes of a care management intervention versus an attention control telephone intervention on changes in patient activation, depressive symptoms and self-rated health [...] Read more.
The purpose of this randomized controlled trial (n = 268) at a Federally Qualified Health Center was to evaluate the outcomes of a care management intervention versus an attention control telephone intervention on changes in patient activation, depressive symptoms and self-rated health among a population of high-need, medically complex adults. Both groups had similar, statistically significant improvements in patient activation and self-rated health. Both groups had significant reductions in depressive symptoms over time; however, the group who received the care management intervention had greater reductions in depressive symptoms. Participants in both study groups who had more depressive symptoms had lower activation at baseline and throughout the 12 month study. Findings suggest that patients in the high-need, medically complex population can realize improvements in patient activation, depressive symptoms, and health status perceptions even with a brief telephone intervention. The importance of treating depressive symptoms in patients with complex health conditions is highlighted. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Effectiveness of a Multicomponent Group Psychological Intervention Program in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Randomized Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5439; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105439 - 19 May 2021
Viewed by 630
Abstract
(1) Background: Stress, anxiety, and depression have been identified as factors that influence the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The main aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of group multicomponent cognitive-behavioral therapy at reducing stress, anxiety, and depression, and [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Stress, anxiety, and depression have been identified as factors that influence the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The main aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of group multicomponent cognitive-behavioral therapy at reducing stress, anxiety, and depression, and improving quality of life and the clinical course of the disease. (2) Methods: A total of 120 patients were evaluated using the General Perceived Stress Scale, Scale of Stress Perceived by the Disease, the anxiety and depression scale, and quality of life questionnaire for patients with IBD. Disease activity was measured using the Mayo Index for ulcerative colitis and CDAI for Crohn’s disease, as well as the number of relapses self-reported by patients. Patients were randomized to receive group multicomponent cognitive-behavioral therapy or treatment as usual. (3) Results: The psychological intervention reduced stress (EAE: 45.7 ± 8.8 vs. 40.6 ± 8.4, p = 0.0001; PSS: 28.0 ± 7.3 vs. 25.1 ± 5.9, p = 0.001) and improved quality of life (164.2 ± 34.3 vs. 176.2 ± 28.0, p = 0.001). An improvement was found in the number of relapses self-reported by patients (0.2 relapses/patient vs. control 0.7 relapses/patient; p = 0.027). No differences were found in disease activity indexes. (4) Conclusions: Psychological therapy was associated with improved stress, quality of life and with a decrease in the number of relapses self-reported by patients. Clinical trial registration number: NCT02614014. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Mindfulness at Methodist—A Prospective Pilot Study of Mindfulness and Stress Resiliency Interventions in Patients at a Tertiary Care Medical Center
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4034; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18084034 - 12 Apr 2021
Viewed by 571
Abstract
Individuals with chronic medical conditions like cancer often experience heightened stress levels that can impact medical decision-making. The aim of this study was assess the impact of mindful stress-reduction interventions in cancer patients and support group participants (which included current and former cancer [...] Read more.
Individuals with chronic medical conditions like cancer often experience heightened stress levels that can impact medical decision-making. The aim of this study was assess the impact of mindful stress-reduction interventions in cancer patients and support group participants (which included current and former cancer patients and their caregivers). A pilot study was conducted in which participants were provided a mindful stress-reduction intervention to determine whether they reduced stress, anxiety, and communication issues. Participants were provided a one-hour mindful stress-reduction intervention by a licensed physical therapist. Surveys were given to participants immediately before and after, and again 7-days after the intervention. Perceived stress was ascertained by asking participants: “Which emotional/mental state do you most frequently find yourself in?” Anxiety and communication abilities were measured using Neuro-QoL™ Anxiety and Communication v.1 instruments. Fifty-nine participants with a mean age of 60.6 years completed the study. Of these, 30.5%, 6.8%, 23.7%, and 39% were diagnosed (or were a caregiver to someone diagnosed) with pancreas, liver, breast, or unknown cancers, respectively. The surveys showed that participants’ perceived stress scores (p < 0.001), anxiety levels (p = 0.0067), and pain scores (p < 0.0001) were reduced after the mindful stress-reduction intervention. Larger studies with control groups are needed to confirm the interventions’ benefits. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Physical Activity and Quality of Life in Hemodialysis Patients and Healthy Controls: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1978; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041978 - 18 Feb 2021
Viewed by 688
Abstract
Hemodialysis (HD) patients have lower functional abilities compared to healthy people, and this is associated with lower physical activity in everyday life. This may affect their quality of life, but research on this topic is limited. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine [...] Read more.
Hemodialysis (HD) patients have lower functional abilities compared to healthy people, and this is associated with lower physical activity in everyday life. This may affect their quality of life, but research on this topic is limited. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the relationship between habitual physical activity and quality of life in HD patients and healthy controls. Ninety-three HD patients and 140 controls participated in the study. Quality of life was assessed using a 36-item medical outcomes study short-form health survey (SF-36). Human Activity Profile (HAP) was used to assess habitual physical activity. The adjusted activity score (AAS) from HAP, age, gender, fat tissue index (FTI), lean tissue index (LTI), and Davies comorbidity score were analyzed as possible predictors of the Physical Component Summary (PCS) of the SF-36. Three sequential linear models were used to model PCS. In Model 1, PCS was regressed by gender and age; in Model 2 the LTI, FTI, and Davies comorbidity scores were added. Model 3 also included AAS. After controlling for age and gender (ModelHD 1: p = 0.056), LTI, FTI, and Davies comorbidity score effects (ModelHD 2: p = 0.181), the AAS accounted for 32% of the variation in PCS of HD patients (ModelHD 3: p < 0.001). Consequently, the PCS of HD patients would increase by 0.431 points if the AAS increased by one point. However, in healthy controls, AAS had a lower impact than in the HD sample (B = 0.359 vs. 0.431), while the corresponding effects of age and gender (ModelH 1: p < 0.001), LTI, FTI, and Davies comorbidity score (ModelH 2: p < 0.001) were adjusted for. The proportion of variation in PCS attributed to AAS was 14.9% (ModelH 3: p < 0.001). The current study results showed that physical activity in everyday life as measured by the HAP questionnaire is associated to a higher degree with the quality of life of HD patients than in healthy subjects. Routine physical activity programs are therefore highly justified, and the nephrology community should play a leading role in this effort. Full article
Article
Impact of Adverse Drug Reactions in Patients with End Stage Renal Disease in Greece
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9101; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239101 - 06 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1119
Abstract
Background: Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) require specialized therapeutic interventions. The decreased renal function that modulates the physiology and presence of comorbidities is often associated with variations in the pharmacological response, thus increasing the risk of adverse drug events or reactions (ADE/ADRs) [...] Read more.
Background: Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) require specialized therapeutic interventions. The decreased renal function that modulates the physiology and presence of comorbidities is often associated with variations in the pharmacological response, thus increasing the risk of adverse drug events or reactions (ADE/ADRs) from co-administered drugs. Methods: A cross-sectional study to record comorbidities, drug–drug interactions (DDIs), ADE/ADRs in patients with chronic kidney disease of stage five in Greece. The study enrolled 60 patients of mean age 64.8 ± 12.9 years, undergoing hemodialysis three times a week. Demographic and social factors, comorbidities, laboratory test data, medication regimens, DDIs and the reporting of ADE/ADRs were analyzed. Results: Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes were the main comorbidities. In total, 50 different DDIs of various clinical significance were identified. CNS, GI-track, and musculoskeletal-system-related ADE/ADRs were most often reported by patients. ADE/ADRs as clinical outcome from DDIs were associated in 64% of the total identified DDIs. There was a positive trend between number of medications, ADE/ADRs report and DDIs. Conclusions: The impact of ADE/ADRs in ESRD patients should be always considered. Guidelines as well as continuous training in the context of evidence-based clinical practice by healthcare personnel on therapy administration and prevention of adverse events are important. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Poor Sleep Quality Decreases Concurrent Training Benefits in Markers of Metabolic Syndrome and Quality of Life of Morbidly Obese Patients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6804; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17186804 - 18 Sep 2020
Viewed by 1373
Abstract
Background: Sleep quality (SQ) plays a role in multiple activities of daily living, but little is known about its role in concurrent training [CT, high-intensity interval (HIIT) plus resistance training (RT)] adaptations for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) markers. [...] Read more.
Background: Sleep quality (SQ) plays a role in multiple activities of daily living, but little is known about its role in concurrent training [CT, high-intensity interval (HIIT) plus resistance training (RT)] adaptations for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) markers. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of a 20-week CT programme on MetS and HRQoL markers according to the SQ of morbidly obese patients. Methods: Twenty-nine morbidly obese patients were allocated to one of two groups: good sleep quality (GSQ, n = 15, 38.07 ± 12.26 years) and poor sleep quality (PSQ, n = 14, 40.79 ± 11.62 years). HRQoL, body mass index, waist circumference (WC), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively), and plasma outcomes were measured. Results: The GSQ group reported significant changes (pre- vs. post-intervention) in WC (114.0 ± 3.1 vs. 110.4 ± 3.4 cm, p = 0.012), SBP (137.0 ± 4.3 vs. 125.6 ± 1.8 mmHg, p = 0.006), and HRQoL general health (51.33 ± 21.08 vs. 64.33 ± 16.24, p = 0.020). By contrast, the PSQ group showed significant changes only in SQ (9.00 ± 2.42 vs. 5.36 ± 2.84, p = 0.004). Conclusions: Morbidly obese PSQ patients showed a lower response for improving MetS and HRQoL markers after a 20-week CT programme than GSQ peers. However, there was a greater effect size for decreasing WC and SBP in favour of the GSQ compared with the PSQ group, suggesting that there are limitations to CT benefits on these outcomes in the PSQ group. These results call for more complex future studies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress, Anxiety, Depression, Levels of Resilience and Burnout in Spanish Health Personnel during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5514; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17155514 - 30 Jul 2020
Cited by 81 | Viewed by 9683
Abstract
The number of health workers infected with COVID-19 in Spain is one of the highest in the world. The aim of this study is to analyse posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. Associations between burnout, resilience, demographic, work and COVID-19 [...] Read more.
The number of health workers infected with COVID-19 in Spain is one of the highest in the world. The aim of this study is to analyse posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. Associations between burnout, resilience, demographic, work and COVID-19 variables are analysed. Cross-sectional data on 1422 health workers were analysed. A total of 56.6% of health workers present symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, 58.6% anxiety disorder, 46% depressive disorder and 41.1% feel emotionally drained. The profile of a health worker with greater posttraumatic stress symptoms would be a person who works in the Autonomous Community of Madrid, in a hospital, is a woman, is concerned that a person he/she lives with may be infected, and thinks that he/she is very likely to be infected. The risk variables for anxiety and depression would be a person that is a woman, working 12- or 24-h shifts, and being worried that a family member could be infected. High scores on emotional exhaustion and depersonalization are risk factors for mental health, with resilience and personal fulfilment being protective variables. Data are provided to improve preventive measures for occupational health workers. Full article
Article
Positive and Negative Changes in Food Habits, Physical Activity Patterns, and Weight Status during COVID-19 Confinement: Associated Factors in the Chilean Population
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5431; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17155431 - 28 Jul 2020
Cited by 38 | Viewed by 5962
Abstract
The association between the changes in lifestyle during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) confinement and body weight have not been studied deeply. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine lifestyle changes, such as eating habits and physical activity (PA) patterns, caused [...] Read more.
The association between the changes in lifestyle during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) confinement and body weight have not been studied deeply. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine lifestyle changes, such as eating habits and physical activity (PA) patterns, caused by confinement during the COVID-19 pandemic and to analyze its association with changes in body weight. Seven hundred participants (women, n = 528 and men, n = 172) aged between 18–62 years old of the Chilean national territory participated in the study. Food habits, PA, body weight, and sociodemographic variables were measured through a survey in May and June 2020. The body weight increase presented positive association with the consumption of fried foods ≥ 3 times per week (OR; 3.36, p < 0.001), low water consumption (OR; 1.58, p = 0.03), and sedentary time ≥6 h/day (OR; 1.85, p = 0.01). Conversely, fish consumed (OR; 0.67, p = 0.03), active breaks (OR; 0.72, p = 0.04), and PA ≥ 4 times per week (OR; 0.51, p = 0.001) presented an inverse association with body weight increase. Daily alcohol consumption (OR; 4.77, p = 0.003) was associated with PA decrease. Food habits, PA, and active breaks may be protective factors for weight increase during COVID-19 confinement. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Sexual Function in Levothyroxine-Treated Hypothyroid Women and Women without Hypothyroidism: A Case-Control
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4325; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17124325 - 17 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 959
Abstract
Background: Levothyroxine is the most common treatment to normalize thyroid hormones levels and to reduce primary hypothyroidism symptoms. Aim: To assess sexual function in women with levothyroxine-treated hypothyroidism and women without hypothyroidism. Methods: A case-control study was performed with 152 women with levothyroxine-treated [...] Read more.
Background: Levothyroxine is the most common treatment to normalize thyroid hormones levels and to reduce primary hypothyroidism symptoms. Aim: To assess sexual function in women with levothyroxine-treated hypothyroidism and women without hypothyroidism. Methods: A case-control study was performed with 152 women with levothyroxine-treated hypothyroidism and 238 women without hypothyroidism. An online survey was used to collect socio-demographic data and the answers to the Women Sexual Function (WSF) questionnaire. Results: Women with levothyroxine-treated hypothyroidism showed a higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction than women in the control group (31.60% vs. 16.40%), furthermore the presence of hypothyroidism increased the risk of sexual dysfunction (p = 0.002, OR: 2.29 (1.36−3.88)). The most affected domains were ‘desire’ (p < 0.001), ‘arousal’ (p = 0.003) and ‘penetration pain’ (p = 0.020). In hypothyroid women, age increased the risk of sexual dysfunctions (p = 0.009, OR: 1.07 (1.01−1.12)), however when age was adjusted (ANCOVA) the sexual dysfunction remained in women with hypothyroidism in all domains. Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is associated with an increase in the prevalence of sexual dysfunction even if treated with levothyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels are normalized. Relevance to clinical practice: Sexual function in hypothyroid women should be assessed before and after starting the treatment. Full article

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Flash Glucose Monitoring and Patient Satisfaction: A Meta-Review of Systematic Reviews
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3123; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063123 - 18 Mar 2021
Viewed by 846
Abstract
Flash glucose monitoring (FGM) systems have been suggested to have clinical beneficial effects in patients with diabetes mellitus, although their improvements in terms of quality of life (QoL) and patients’ satisfaction are not always addressed or are considered a secondary outcome. Thus, the [...] Read more.
Flash glucose monitoring (FGM) systems have been suggested to have clinical beneficial effects in patients with diabetes mellitus, although their improvements in terms of quality of life (QoL) and patients’ satisfaction are not always addressed or are considered a secondary outcome. Thus, the aim of this meta-review is to establish the benefits of FGM in terms of patients’ satisfaction and QoL in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients using evidence from past systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Major databases were searched for systematic reviews (with or without meta-analyses) that assessed the satisfaction or QoL of type 1 or 2 diabetes patients using FGM compared with other glucose monitoring systems. The quality of the included systematic reviews was addressed with the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews 2 (AMSTAR-2) tool. Six systematic reviews (including two meta-analyses) were included in the meta-review. Evidence suggests that FGM systems seem to improve patients’ satisfaction and QoL compared with self-monitoring of blood glucose, although the high variability in the measurement tools, the clinical significance and the quality of the systematic reviews included do not allow us to state FGM benefits with any certainty. Further research, including high-quality randomised clinical trials, differentiating the needs of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients and focusing on psychosocial benefits for these patients is needed to optimise clinical decisions between patients and professionals by developing the right health technology assessment for FGM systems. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Eficacy of Cryotherapy in the Prevention of Oral Mucosistis in Adult Patients with Chemotherapy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 994; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18030994 - 23 Jan 2021
Viewed by 993
Abstract
Oral mucositis (OM) is a common side effect of cancer therapies. It causes ulcerative, painful lesions in the oral cavity that can provoke malnutrition, increased risk of infection, longer hospital stays, and seriously affect the quality of life. Cooling the mucosa with oral [...] Read more.
Oral mucositis (OM) is a common side effect of cancer therapies. It causes ulcerative, painful lesions in the oral cavity that can provoke malnutrition, increased risk of infection, longer hospital stays, and seriously affect the quality of life. Cooling the mucosa with oral cryotherapy (OC) during and/or after chemotherapy is the most accessible and tolerable intervention available. The aim of this study is to define the efficacy of OC for preventing OM induced by chemotherapy/radiotherapy in adult patients with cancer. Secondary endpoints include associated problems as pain. A systematic search was performed using the Pubmed, WOS (Web of Science), Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and BVS databases for articles published up to 2010. After inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, a total of eight articles were analyzed in this review. In seven of the eight articles, the incidence of OM of all grades was significantly lower in the OC group compared with the no-OC group. Use of opioids and level of pain were also significantly reduced. OC is an effective intervention to reduce the incidence of OM induced by chemotherapy as well as the associated severity and pain. Based on these results, OC with only water or with chamomile, associated or not with other mouthwash therapies, is an effective intervention to reduce the incidence of OM induced by chemotherapy as well as the associated severity and pain. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop