Special Issue "Climate Change and Environment Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alfredo Rocha
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) & Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: numerical weather and climate modelling; climate variability and change; extreme weather events; Climate and health; meteorology and wind and solar energy production
Dr. Ricardo Almendra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography and Tourism, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Centre of Studies on Geography and Spatial Planning (CEGOT), Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: health geography; thermal discomfort; climate and health; biometeorology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change is one of the most urgent challenges that our society needs to deal with. The influence of climate change on public health is undeniable, and the health risks of climate change have been increasing over the last decades. Armful weather phenomena, such as extreme temperatures events, heavy rains, or droughts, are becoming more frequent and more severe and are affecting larger areas of the planet. At the same time, health risks associated with climate change and their consequences vary between individuals and in different communities.

The health consequences of climate change are broad and are very often indirect. Climatic influences on health are often mediated by interactions with other environmental conditions, social and demographic characteristics, and adaptive policies. Between 2030 and 2050, climate change is expected to cause approximately 250,000 additional deaths per year and to deteriorate social and environmental determinants of health (e.g., clean air, safe drinking water, food, shelter).

This Special Issue aims to present original research on the consequences of climate change on health. We welcome manuscripts examining health risk related but not limited to sea level rise, drought, heat waves, cyclones, and other extreme events. We encourage submissions that characterize novel health impacts of these environmental stressors, either alone or jointly. We are also particularly interested in contributions that evaluate factors, policies, or interventions that may help mitigate or adapt to climate change, as well as improve air quality. Finally, research that identifies vulnerable subpopulations or communities and emphasizes principles of equity is strongly encouraged.

Dr. Alfredo Rocha
Dr. Ricardo Almendra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • health
  • sea level rise
  • cyclones
  • drought
  • heat waves
  • extreme events
  • air quality
  • mitigation
  • adaptation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Relationship between Environmental Regulation, Pollution and Corporate Environmental Responsibility
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8018; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18158018 - 29 Jul 2021
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Abstract
The rapid economic development has severely damaged the ecological environment and affected public health. Firms are the main source of pollution; thus, corporate environmental responsibility (CER) has attracted great attention from the government, shareholders and the public. This study used both the fixed [...] Read more.
The rapid economic development has severely damaged the ecological environment and affected public health. Firms are the main source of pollution; thus, corporate environmental responsibility (CER) has attracted great attention from the government, shareholders and the public. This study used both the fixed effects model and the system GMM (Generalized Method of Moments) model to examine the relationship between environmental pollution, environmental regulations and CER for 30 provinces in China, over the period 2005 to 2015. This study drew the following results: first, mandatory CER disclosure policy can significantly decrease environmental pollution. Second, an inverted U-shaped relationship exists between environmental regulations and environmental pollution. Third, environmental pollution has a positive impact on CER. Fourth, an inverted U-shaped relationship exists between environmental regulations and CER. Therefore, it is necessary to find a balance between environmental regulations affecting environmental pollution and CER so that they can effectively reduce environmental pollution and increase the enthusiasm of firms to carry out environmental responsibility activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Environment Health)
Article
Can Mandatory Disclosure Policies Promote Corporate Environmental Responsibility?—Quasi-Natural Experimental Research on China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 6033; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18116033 - 03 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Corporate environmental responsibility (CER) is an important component of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) report, and an important carrier for enterprises to disclose environmental protection information. Based on the corporate micro data, this paper evaluates the effect of a mandatory CSR disclosure policy [...] Read more.
Corporate environmental responsibility (CER) is an important component of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) report, and an important carrier for enterprises to disclose environmental protection information. Based on the corporate micro data, this paper evaluates the effect of a mandatory CSR disclosure policy on the fulfillment of corporate environmental responsibility by adopting the difference-in-differences model (DID) with the release of a mandatory disclosure policy of China in 2008 as a quasi-natural experiment. The study draws the following conclusions: First, a mandatory CSR disclosure policy can promote the fulfillment of CER. Second, after the implementation of a mandatory CSR disclosure policy, enterprises can improve their CER level through two channels: improving the quality of environmental management disclosure and increasing the number of patents. Third, the heterogeneity of the impacts of mandatory CSR disclosure on CER is reflected in three aspects: different CER levels, different corporate scales and a different property rights structure. In terms of the CER level, there is an inverted U-shaped relationship between the CER level and mandatory CSR disclosure effect. In terms of the corporate scale, mandatory disclosure of CSR plays a greater role in large-scale enterprises. In terms of the structure of property rights, mandatory CSR disclosure has a greater effect on non-state-owned enterprises. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Environment Health)
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Article
Impact of Extreme Temperatures on Ambulance Dispatches Due to Cardiovascular Causes in North-West Spain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9001; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17239001 - 03 Dec 2020
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Abstract
Introduction and objectives. The increase in mortality and hospital admissions associated with high and low temperatures is well established. However, less is known about the influence of extreme ambient temperature conditions on cardiovascular ambulance dispatches. This study seeks to evaluate the effects [...] Read more.
Introduction and objectives. The increase in mortality and hospital admissions associated with high and low temperatures is well established. However, less is known about the influence of extreme ambient temperature conditions on cardiovascular ambulance dispatches. This study seeks to evaluate the effects of minimum and maximum daily temperatures on cardiovascular morbidity in the cities of Vigo and A Coruña in North-West Spain, using emergency medical calls during the period 2005–2017. Methods. For the purposes of analysis, we employed a quasi-Poisson time series regression model, within a distributed non-linear lag model by exposure variable and city. The relative risks of cold- and heat-related calls were estimated for each city and temperature model. Results. A total of 70,537 calls were evaluated, most of which were associated with low maximum and minimum temperatures on cold days in both cities. At maximum temperatures, significant cold-related effects were observed at lags of 3–6 days in Vigo and 5–11 days in A Coruña. At minimum temperatures, cold-related effects registered a similar pattern in both cities, with significant relative risks at lags of 4 to 12 days in A Coruña. Heat-related effects did not display a clearly significant pattern. Conclusions. An increase in cardiovascular morbidity is observed with moderately low temperatures without extremes being required to establish an effect. Public health prevention plans and warning systems should consider including moderate temperature range in the prevention of cardiovascular morbidity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Environment Health)
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Review

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Review
Impact of Climate Change on Eye Diseases and Associated Economical Costs
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7197; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137197 - 05 Jul 2021
Viewed by 617
Abstract
Climate change generates negative impacts on human health. However, little is known about specific impacts on eye diseases, especially in arid and semi-arid areas where increases in air temperatures are expected. Therefore, the main goals of this research are: (i) to highlight the [...] Read more.
Climate change generates negative impacts on human health. However, little is known about specific impacts on eye diseases, especially in arid and semi-arid areas where increases in air temperatures are expected. Therefore, the main goals of this research are: (i) to highlight the association between common eye diseases and environmental factors; and (ii) to analyze, through the available literature, the health expenditure involved in combating these diseases and the savings from mitigating the environmental factors that aggravate them. Mixed methods were used to assess the cross-variables (environmental factors, eye diseases, health costs). Considering Southern Spain as an example, our results showed that areas with similar climatic conditions could increase eye diseases due to a sustained increase in temperatures and torrential rains, among other factors. We highlight that an increase in eye diseases in Southern Spain is conditioned by the effects of climate change by up to 36.5%; the economic burden of the main eye diseases, extrapolated to the rest of the country, would represent an annual burden of 0.7% of Spain’s Gross Domestic Product. In conclusion, the increase in eye diseases has a strong economic and social impact that could be reduced with proper management of the effects of climate change. We propose a new concept: disease sink, defined as any climate change mitigation action which reduces the incidence or morbidity of disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Environment Health)
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