Special Issue "Cognitive Empowerment for the Enhancement of Active and Healthy Aging"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Silvana Miceli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Italy
Interests: aging; cognitive psychology; health promotion; decision-making; intelligence; social media addiction
Dr. Santo Di Nuovo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Educational Sciences, University of Catania, Catania CT, Italy
Interests: methodological aspects and psychometric applied to different areas of psychology: cognitive, personality, normal and pathological, legal, clinical and rehabilitation
Dr. Barbara Caci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Italy
Interests: human-computer interaction; web-psychology; personality; autobiographical memory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the increasing number of older adults, the progressive aging of the population requires the implementation of appropriate and innovative strategies for mitigating the adverse effects of this process on both individuals and the socio-economic system. Although one of the main effects of aging is undoubtedly linked to the decline in cognitive functions, it should be stressed that this decline, which has both functional and neurological aspects, even if it cannot be avoided, can be significantly postponed (Boots et al. 2015; Miceli & Gangemi, 2011; Misuraca, Miceli, & Teuscher, 2017; Smart et al., 2014; Miceli, Maniscalco, & Matranga, 2019). Over the last few decades, researchers have made an enormous amount of progress in understanding the biological processes underlying cognition, shedding light on the influence of both lifestyles and different technological aids (e.g., serious games, robotics, artificial intelligence) on the development or enhancement of human cognitive abilities.

This Special Issue aims to present a collection of studies focused on interdisciplinary approaches of neurology, medicine, cognitive psychology, human–computer interaction, computer science, and engineering to the creation of new perspectives on the prevention of the aging-associated decline in cognitive functions and social policy interventions that can promote “active and healthy aging”.

Dr. Silvana Miceli
Dr. Santo Di Nuovo
Dr. Barbara Caci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • active aging
  • cognitive functions
  • health promotion
  • cognitive rehabilitation
  • technological aids (e.g., serious, games, robotics, web platforms, artificial intelligence)
  • cognitive training
  • human–computer interaction
  • social health services.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Study of Chemotherapy-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Women with Breast Cancer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8896; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17238896 - 30 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 705
Abstract
Background: Oncology patients experience a large number of symptoms and, those referring to cognitive performance has an ever-increasing importance in clinical practice, due to the increase in survival rates and interest in the patient’s quality of life. The studies reviewed showed that chemotherapy-related [...] Read more.
Background: Oncology patients experience a large number of symptoms and, those referring to cognitive performance has an ever-increasing importance in clinical practice, due to the increase in survival rates and interest in the patient’s quality of life. The studies reviewed showed that chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment might occur in 15 and 50% of oncology patients. The main objective of this research was to study the impact of chemotherapy on the cognitive function of patients with locoregional breast cancer. Method: Analytical, prospective, longitudinal study using three measures, unifactorial intrasubject design, non-probability, and random selection sampling. The sample comprised women newly diagnosed with locoregional breast cancer in stages I, II, IIIA who received chemotherapy at the University Hospital of Salamanca (Complejo Asistencial Universitario de Salamanca), randomly selected for three years. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, HAD); quality of life (QLQ-BR23 scale) and the following cognitive variables were assessed—processing speed, attention, memory, and executive functions (subtests of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale and the Trail Making Test). Results: The final sample size included 151 participants; 23 were excluded. A decline in cognitive performance was observed in patients, which did not completely recover two months after chemotherapy was completed. Additionally, worse cognitive performance was observed in patients with anxious or depressive symptoms. There was a negative impact on the quality of life. Conclusion: Chemotherapy had an impact on the cognitive performance of oncology patients in most cognitive domains studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive Empowerment for the Enhancement of Active and Healthy Aging)
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