Special Issue "Community Participation in Disaster Risk Reduction: Perspectives, Methodologies and Evaluations"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Subhajyoti Samaddar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji , Kyoto 611-0011, Japan
Interests: partciptory approach; risk communication; community based disaster preparedness; implementation science
Dr. Kaori Kitagawa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Education, University College London, 20 Bedford Way, WC1H 0AL, London, UK
Interests: community learning; social learning; informal learning; lifelong learning; community-based DRR; community engagement; participation; participatory approach
Prof. Hirokazu Tatano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan
Interests: economic impact analysis of disaster; disaster recovery; decision-making for disaster risk reduction; implementation science of integrated disaster risk management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, community participation has become a buzzword for successful social implementation of disaster risk reduction (DRR) plans and strategies, yet its actualization largely remains elusive. The so-called successful community-based DRR initiatives have rarely been replicated and scaled up. Innovative tools and methods have continuously been introduced to increase the effective involvement of local communities in DRR, yet there hardly exists any consensus about the process of participation—who will be involved, when, and to what extent. In principle, several claims have been made in favor of community participation but they have have seldom been empirically validated. The very idea of participation remains value-laden. In addition, communities are not homogeneous units, which creates an enormous challenge for selecting, representing, and incorporating the core values, concerns, and visions of communities in the decision-making process. This is a timely call to systematically and rigorously examine the process and outcome factors of community participation to unravel what works, when, and why. This Special Issue invites papers on DRR focusing on theoretical and empirical studies of:

- Participatory framework: process and outcome

- Evaluation of participatory programs and projects

- Innovative participatory tools and techniques

- Implementation challenges of participatory disaster risk reduction

- Participatory disaster risk governance models and approaches

- Community of practice and purpose in DRR

-  Community definition, sense of community in participatory process

- Treads and patterns of community-based DRR across regions and countries

Prof. Subhajyoti Samaddar
Dr. Kaori Kitagawa
Prof. Hirokazu Tatano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • community-based
  • participatory approach
  • processes and outcomes of participation
  • participatory methods and tools
  • participatory disaster risk governance
  • implementation science for DRR
  • case studies of community-based DRR
  • evaluation
  • integrated disaster risk management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Environment Actors Confronting a Post Climate-Related Disaster Scenario: A Feasibility Study of an Action-Based Intervention Aiming to Promote Climate Action
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5949; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115949 - 01 Jun 2021
Viewed by 694
Abstract
(1) A climate change awareness-action gap still prevails in our society, with individuals showing significant social inertia regarding environmental issues. The communication on climate change is pointed out as one of the causes of the social inertia; (2) Following an action-oriented transformation research, [...] Read more.
(1) A climate change awareness-action gap still prevails in our society, with individuals showing significant social inertia regarding environmental issues. The communication on climate change is pointed out as one of the causes of the social inertia; (2) Following an action-oriented transformation research, the main goal of this study was to ascertain the feasibility of an action-based communication intervention, based on the participants’ exposure to a post climate-related disaster scenario. The feasibility of the action-based communication intervention was assessed in a focus group meeting, whose content was qualitatively analysed; (3) The results of this study demonstrate that action-based communication interventions are feasible to trigger an attitude transformation, catalysed by the experiential processing of climate change and by the affect arousal; (4) This study comes to contribute to a transformation of the climate change communication praxis, by highlighting the urgency to shift the for a new paradigm of communicating climate change, in which the affect and the experiential processing should account for conveying environment-related information in order to promote society’s climate action. Full article
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Article
A Methodology of Workshops to Explore Mutual Assistance Activities for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3814; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18073814 - 06 Apr 2021
Viewed by 538
Abstract
To minimize the damage caused by large earthquakes, mutual assistance activities between residents and rescue victims (i.e., to support residents who cannot evacuate individually) are important. To enhance these activities, the technologies and methods for creating a Community Disaster Management Plan (CDMP), based [...] Read more.
To minimize the damage caused by large earthquakes, mutual assistance activities between residents and rescue victims (i.e., to support residents who cannot evacuate individually) are important. To enhance these activities, the technologies and methods for creating a Community Disaster Management Plan (CDMP), based on the quantitative evaluation of mutual assistance abilities, are required. However, the lack of a method for it is a key issue. This study aims to develop a methodology of workshops for making CDMPs by using the developed support tool by the authors to explore and promote mutual assistance activities. Through the demonstration and examination of a Community Disaster Management Plan on actual districts, the findings mentioned in this article were obtained. Moreover, the usability of this method is shown. In particular, this method is effective at revising CDMPs, and raising resident awareness on the importance of mutual assistance. The suggested method can also improve the lack of techniques involved in promoting mutual assistance. Full article
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Article
Linking Disaster Risk Reduction and Healthcare in Locations with Limited Accessibility: Challenges and Opportunities of Participatory Research
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 248; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18010248 - 31 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1057
Abstract
Disaster risk reduction and healthcare support each other, including the mitigation of further harm after illness or injury. These connections are particularly relevant in locations which have permanent or temporary limited accessibility. In these circumstances, people are required to be self-sufficient in providing [...] Read more.
Disaster risk reduction and healthcare support each other, including the mitigation of further harm after illness or injury. These connections are particularly relevant in locations which have permanent or temporary limited accessibility. In these circumstances, people are required to be self-sufficient in providing emergency and long-term healthcare with limited resources. Planning and preparing to mitigate further harm after illness or injury from disasters (disaster risk reduction) must include people living and working in locations with limited accessibility, meaning that participatory research can be used. The challenges and opportunities of enacting participatory research in such contexts have not been thoroughly examined. The research question of this paper is therefore, “What challenges and opportunities occur when participatory research links disaster risk reduction and healthcare to mitigate illness and injury in locations with limited accessibility?” To answer this research question, the method used is a qualitative evidence synthesis, combined with an overview paper approach. Two principal themes of challenges and opportunities are examined: defining the data and collecting the data. The themes are explored in theory and then through contextual examples. The conclusion is that an overarching challenge is divergent goals of research and actions that, when recognized, lead to opportunities for improved connections between disaster risk reduction and healthcare. Full article
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