Special Issue "Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes"

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ana López De Andrés
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Preventive Medicine and Public Health Teaching and Research Unit, Health Sciences Faculty, Rey Juan Carlos University, 28922 Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain
Interests: epidemiology; diabetes; prevention; hospitalization; survey

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diabetes mellitus is a serious threat to global health that respects neither socioeconomic status nor national boundaries. People living with diabetes are at risk of developing a number of serious and life-threatening complications, leading to an increased need for medical care, a reduced quality of life, and undue stress on families. Diabetes and its complications, if not well managed, can lead to frequent hospital admissions and premature death. Globally, diabetes is among the top 10 causes of death. Given the importance of diabetes, the journal International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is launching a Special Issue entitled “Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes” with the aim of gathering together accurate and up-to-date scientific information on all aspects of diabetes. We are pleased to invite you and your co-workers to submit your original research articles reporting on health-related quality of life, mental health, health services utilization, disability, pain, comorbidities, hospitalizations, and pharmacological interventions. We would also like to invite you to submit review articles aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the epidemiology and prevention of this disease.

Prof. Dr. Ana López De Andrés
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • life styles
  • mental health
  • health services utilization
  • disability
  • pain
  • comorbidities
  • hospitalization
  • pharmacological treatment

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Article
Mental Health among Spanish Adults with Diabetes: Findings from a Population-Based Case–Controlled Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 6088; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18116088 - 04 Jun 2021
Viewed by 587
Abstract
Background: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the prevalence of self-reported mental disorders, psychological distress, and psychotropic drug consumption among people with diabetes mellitus (DM) and matched non-DM controls. Methods: A case–controlled study using data from the Spanish National [...] Read more.
Background: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the prevalence of self-reported mental disorders, psychological distress, and psychotropic drug consumption among people with diabetes mellitus (DM) and matched non-DM controls. Methods: A case–controlled study using data from the Spanish National Health Interview Survey was conducted in 2017. We identified 2116 DM adults (aged ≥35 years). Non-DM controls were matched 1:1 by age, sex, and province of residence. Results: Prevalence of mental disorders (25.0% vs. 19.2%; p < 0.001), psychological distress (29% vs. 19.5%; p < 0.001), and consumption of psychiatric medications (29.7% vs. 23.5%; p < 0.001) among DM cases were higher than those among matched non-DM controls. The DM patient variables associated with experiencing a mental disorder, psychological distress, and consumption of psychiatric medications were: being a woman, worse self-rated health, and a visit to a psychologist within the last year. Older age (≥80 years) was associated with a lower probability of reporting mental disorders and psychological distress among DM cases. Not practicing physical exercise was significantly associated with experiencing psychological distress. Conclusions: Adults with DM included in our investigation have a significantly higher prevalence of mental disorders, psychological distress, and consumption of psychiatric medications than non-DM controls. It is necessary to implement screening strategies and psychological interventions to improve the mental health of DM patients in Spain, focusing especially on women and those aged 35 to 59 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes)
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Article
Sex-Related Disparities in the Incidence and Outcomes of Ischemic Stroke among Type 2 Diabetes Patients. A Matched-Pair Analysis Using the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Database for Years 2016–2018
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3659; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18073659 - 01 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 578
Abstract
Background: To analyze the incidence, use of therapeutic procedures, and in-hospital outcomes among patients suffering an ischemic stroke (IS) according to the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Spain (2016–2018) and to assess the existence of sex differences. Methods: Matched-pair analysis [...] Read more.
Background: To analyze the incidence, use of therapeutic procedures, and in-hospital outcomes among patients suffering an ischemic stroke (IS) according to the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Spain (2016–2018) and to assess the existence of sex differences. Methods: Matched-pair analysis using the Spanish National Hospital discharge. Results: IS was coded in 92,524 men and 79,731 women (29.53% with T2DM). The adjusted incidence of IS (IRR 2.02; 95% CI 1.99–2.04) was higher in T2DM than non-T2DM subjects, with higher IRRs in both sexes. Men with T2DM had a higher incidence of IS than T2DM women (IRR 1.54; 95% CI 1.51–1.57). After matching patients with T2DM, those with other comorbid conditions, however, significantly less frequently received endovascular thrombectomy and thrombolytic therapy. In-hospital mortality (IHM) was lower among T2DM men than matched non-T2DM men (8.23% vs. 8.71%; p < 0.001). Women with T2DM had a higher IHM rate than T2DM men (11.5% vs. 10.20%; p = 0.004). After adjusting for confounders, women with T2DM had a 12% higher mortality risk than T2DM men (OR 1.12; 95% CI 1.04–1.21). Conclusions: T2DM is associated with higher incidence of IS in both sexes. Men with T2DM have a higher incidence rates of IS than T2DM women. Women with T2DM have a higher risk of dying in the hospital. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes)
Article
Reversal of the Upward Trend of Obesity in Boys, but Not in Girls, in Spain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1842; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041842 - 14 Feb 2021
Viewed by 716
Abstract
(1) Background: To compare the prevalence of overweight and obesity in boys and girls and to estimate socioeconomic differences associated with obesity in Spain in 1997, 2007, and 2017. (2) Methods: Data were drawn from national health interview surveys. For each year of [...] Read more.
(1) Background: To compare the prevalence of overweight and obesity in boys and girls and to estimate socioeconomic differences associated with obesity in Spain in 1997, 2007, and 2017. (2) Methods: Data were drawn from national health interview surveys. For each year of study, the prevalence of overweight and obesity was measured, and these results were compared by gender (boy/girl) and socioeconomic status (low/high education). (3) Results: The prevalence of overweight and obesity rose from 1997 to 2007 but then fell in 2017 in all subgroups except in girls aged 10 to 15 years. In this group, there was a steady increase in the prevalence of both overweight (1997, 14.6%; 2007, 17.7%; 2017, 19.6%) and obesity (1.1, 3.2, and 3.7%, respectively). The decrease in prevalence of overweight in both sexes and of obesity in boys, along with the increase in prevalence of obesity in girls, was of a higher magnitude in children whose parents had a lower educational level. (4) Conclusions: The apparent turnaround in the obesity epidemic in Spain should be interpreted with caution. Children’s body weight is influenced by both gender and socioeconomic status—considerations that should be kept in mind when designing health promotion interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes)
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Article
Do Diabetes Mellitus Differences Exist within Generations? Three Generations of Moluccans in The Netherlands
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 493; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020493 - 09 Jan 2021
Viewed by 667
Abstract
Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is known to be more prevalent among migrants compared to their host populations. It is unclear whether DM prevalence differs between generations among migrants. We investigated the differences in DM prevalence among three generations of Moluccans, who have been [...] Read more.
Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is known to be more prevalent among migrants compared to their host populations. It is unclear whether DM prevalence differs between generations among migrants. We investigated the differences in DM prevalence among three generations of Moluccans, who have been living for over 65 years in the Netherlands, compared to the Dutch population. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data of a healthcare insurance database on hospital and medication use (Achmea Health Database) were used. The dataset contained 5394 Moluccans and 52,880 Dutch persons of all ages. DM differences were assessed by means of logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, urbanization, and area socio-economic status. Results: The prevalence of DM was higher in all generations of Moluccans compared to the Dutch. The adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for DM were significantly higher in total group of Moluccans compared to the Dutch (AOR 1.60, 95% CI 1.42–1.80) and across the first and second generation of Moluccans compared to the Dutch (first generation (1.73, 1.47–2.04) and second generation (1.44, 1.19–1.75). Higher AOR were found for first generation men (1.55, 1.22–1.97) and first (1.90, 1.52–2.37) and second (1.63, 1.24–2.13) generation Moluccan women compared to the Dutch. AOR for the third generation Moluccans was increased to a similar extent (1.51, 0.97–2.34), although not statistical significant. Conclusions: Our findings show higher odds of DM across generations of Moluccans compared to the Dutch. DM prevention strategies for minorities should be targeted at all migrant generations in host countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes)
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Article
Time Trends in Spain from 2001 to 2018 in the Incidence and Outcomes of Hospitalization for Urinary Tract Infections in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9427; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249427 - 16 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 632
Abstract
We aim to examine the incidences, clinical characteristics, and in-hospital outcomes of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients hospitalized with urinary tract infections (UTIs) in Spain and to identify the factors associated with in-hospital mortality (IHM). A retrospective observational study was carried out with [...] Read more.
We aim to examine the incidences, clinical characteristics, and in-hospital outcomes of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients hospitalized with urinary tract infections (UTIs) in Spain and to identify the factors associated with in-hospital mortality (IHM). A retrospective observational study was carried out with a sample that included all adult patients who were hospitalized for UTIs between 2001 and 2018 and collected in the Spanish National Health System Hospital Discharge Database. We identified 850,276 patients with UTIs (25.49% with T2DM). The incidence of UTIs increased in patients with and without diabetes from 290.76 and 74.79 cases per 100,000 inhabitants in the period from year 2001 to year 2003 to 568.45 and 144.0 in the period from 2016 to 2018, respectively (p < 0.001). Adjusted incidence of UTIs was higher in T2DM patients (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 4.36; 95% CI 4.35–4.39). The multivariable analysis showed a significant reduction in the IHM over time for men and women with T2DM. In T2DM, patients’ higher IHM was associated with older age, comorbidities, and Staphylococcus aureus isolation. Women with T2DM had a higher risk of dying than men. The risk of IHM with an episode of UTIs was independent of the presence of T2DM (odds ratio (OR) 0.97; 95% CI 0.91–1.01). We conclude that the incidence of UTIs was over four times higher in T2DM than nondiabetic patients and has increased over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes)
Article
Type 2 Diabetes Is a Risk Factor for Suffering and for in-Hospital Mortality with Pulmonary Embolism. A Population-Based Study in Spain (2016–2018)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8347; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17228347 - 11 Nov 2020
Viewed by 758
Abstract
(1) Background: The relationship between type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and pulmonary embolism (PE) has not been well stablished so far. We aim to analyze incidence, clinical conditions and in-hospital mortality (IHM) according to the presence of T2DM among patients hospitalized for suffering from [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The relationship between type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and pulmonary embolism (PE) has not been well stablished so far. We aim to analyze incidence, clinical conditions and in-hospital mortality (IHM) according to the presence of T2DM among patients hospitalized for suffering from PE. The factors associated with IHM were identified. (2) Methods: Patients aged ≥40 years hospitalized for PE from 2016 to 2018 included in the Spanish National Health System Hospital Discharge Database were analyzed. Dependent variables included incidence, IHM and length of hospital stay. Independent variables were age, sex, diagnosed comorbidities, thrombolytic therapy and inferior vena cava filter placement. Poisson and logistic regression models were constructed for multivariable analysis. (3) Results: Of the 47,190 hospitalizations for PE recorded, 16.52% had T2DM. Adjusted incidence of PE was higher among T2DM women (IRR 1.83; 95% CI: 1.58–1.96) and men (IRR 1.22; 95% CI: 1.18–1.27) than among non-diabetic subjects. Crude IHM in T2DM patients with PE was similar in both sexes but higher than in non-diabetic patients. Among T2DM patients with PE, risk factors for IHM included older age, comorbidity, atrial fibrillation and massive PE. Obesity was associated with lower IHM. Suffering T2DM was a risk of IHM (OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.05–1.26) after PE. (4) Conclusions: The incidence of PE is higher in T2DM men and women than in non-diabetic patients. T2DM was a risk factor for IHM after PE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes)
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