Special Issue "Dietary Polyphenols and Health"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Marva Irene Sweeney-Nixon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3, Canada
Interests: cardiovascular diseases; hypertension; atherosclerosis; diabetes; renal disease; stroke and neurodegenerative diseases; different forms of cell death; neuroprotection; oxidative stress and inflammation; antioxidants; blueberry polyphenols
Dr. Cynthia Blanton
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83201-8117, USA
Interests: nutrition and skeletal health; dietary assessment; probiotics and prebiotics; polyphenols

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is preparing a Special Issue focusing on the effects of dietary polyphenols on health. Polyphenols are plant compounds that possess bioactivity in the body, including in supporting oxidative defense.

This Special Issue aims to compile current research on the health benefits of dietary polyphenols. This is an active area of research involving multiple disciplines and we seek to present varied perspectives that provide up-to-date evidence linking polyphenols to health outcomes. Invited manuscripts include original research articles, food-based and supplement investigations, longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, intervention and epidemiological research, meta-analyses, and reviews.

Dr. Marva Irene Sweeney-Nixon
Dr. Cynthia Blanton
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polyphenols
  • flavanols
  • health
  • antioxidants
  • anti-inflammatory
  • diet
  • nutrition

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Communication
Effect of Morning vs. Evening Turmeric Consumption on Urine Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Obese, Middle-Aged Adults: A Feasibility Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 4088; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17114088 - 08 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 995
Abstract
The circadian rhythm of biological systems is an important consideration in developing health interventions. The immune and oxidative defense systems exhibit circadian periodicity, with an anticipatory increase in activity coincident with the onset of the active period. Spice consumption is associated with enhanced [...] Read more.
The circadian rhythm of biological systems is an important consideration in developing health interventions. The immune and oxidative defense systems exhibit circadian periodicity, with an anticipatory increase in activity coincident with the onset of the active period. Spice consumption is associated with enhanced oxidative defense. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of a protocol comparing the effects of morning vs. evening consumption of turmeric on urine markers of oxidative stress in obese, middle-aged adults. Using a within-sample design, participants received each of four clock time x treatment administrations, each separated by one week: morning turmeric; evening turmeric; morning control; evening control. Participants prepared for each lab visit by consuming a low-antioxidant diet for two days and fasting for 12 h. Urine was collected in the lab at baseline and one-hour post-meal and at home for the following five hours. The results showed that the processes were successful in executing the protocol and collecting the measurements and that participants understood and adhered to the instructions. The findings also revealed that the spice treatment did not elicit the expected antioxidant effect and that the six-hour post-treatment urine collection period did not detect differences in urine endpoints across treatments. This feasibility study revealed that modifications to the spice treatment and urine sampling timeline are needed before implementing a larger study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols and Health)
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