Special Issue "Eating Habits and Health"

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Cíntia Ferreira-Pêgo
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
CBIOS—Universidade Lusófona’s Research Center for Biosciences & Health Technologies, Campo Grande 376, 1749-024 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: nutrition; dietetics; eating habits; body composition; eating behavior; Mediterranean diet; hydration; fruit juices; sugar-sweetened beverages

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A Topical Collection on eating habits and health is being organized in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. For detailed information on the journal, I refer you to https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/ijerph.

Eating habits are related to why and how people eat, which foods they eat, and with whom they eat, as well as the ways people obtain, store, use, and discard food. Individual, social, cultural, religious, economic, environmental, and political factors all influence people’s eating habits. It seems clear that the quantity and quality of the consumed food can also affect people’s health. In this way, it is easy to believe that health, and disease prevention and/or treatment may also influence an individual’s eating habits. However, can the other way be possible? Do eating habits influence health and disease? 

This Special Issue aims to present a broad updated view of different eating habits, dietary patterns, and dietary behaviors throughout the lifespan and in different populations. Contributions from all over the globe are encouraged, in order to provide an image of the different diets countries have in place to deal with health prevention and disease treatment.

Researchers are invited to submit original research articles, using any study design, including case studies, implementation/interventional studies, cohort studies, cross-sectional studies, as well as reviews and meta-analyses.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Cíntia Ferreira-Pêgo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eating habits
  • nutrition
  • dietary habits
  • diet
  • health
  • disease
  • public health
  • epidemiology
  • dietary behavior
  • dietary patterns

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Online Test of Risk Self-Detection of Eating Disorders
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4103; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18084103 - 13 Apr 2021
Viewed by 499
Abstract
This study’s central aim was to examine the effectiveness of an online test of the Risk Self-Detection of Eating Disorders through the evaluation of (1) its psychometric properties, the significant probability of predicting risk eating behavior and the correct classification of membership to [...] Read more.
This study’s central aim was to examine the effectiveness of an online test of the Risk Self-Detection of Eating Disorders through the evaluation of (1) its psychometric properties, the significant probability of predicting risk eating behavior and the correct classification of membership to the risk or non-risk group and (2) the ability to measure users’ risk self-awareness through a group of statements and explore the expected responses through frequency analysis of the content provided by the users. The non-probability sample was comprised of n = 541 women aged 15 to 25 (M = 18.3; SD = 2.4). The instrument showed good psychometric properties, a structure of three predictive risk factors, and proper effect sizes (R2 = 0.67–0.69). Among the most critical findings were high percentages of correct classification (94–97%) and expected responses (61%). The logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of presenting eating disorders was higher if the participants smoked, consumed alcohol, had sexual experiences before the age of 15, and if those sexual experiences were non-consensual. Evidence is presented about the promising results of the online data collection method and its potential benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Habits and Health)
Back to TopTop