Special Issue "Eating Disorders and Related Research"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Paolo Cotrufo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Observatory on Eating Disorders, Department of Psychology, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta, Italy
Interests: eating disorders such as anorexia; bulimia and binge eating disorders; parental bondings; body image; psychoanalysis; prevention interventions; epidemiology; NSSI
Dr. Stefania Cella
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Observatory on Eating Disorders, Department of Psychology, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta, Italy
Interests: psychoanalysis; eating disorders; parental bonding; epidemiology; body/mind relationship; psychosomatics; reverse anorexia; childhood obesity; self-injury; health and clinical psychology; preventive intervention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past fifty years, eating disorders have progressively become the subject of increasingly large and complex research studies. Starting from studies on epidemiology, clinical characteristics, risk factors, parental relationships, comorbidities, importance of body image and shape, and preventive interventions have been promoted and tested and the effectiveness of some therapeutic interventions has been evaluated.

This Special Issue aims to collect original empirical and theoretical studies that are not limited to the main research areas covered so far, but on the developments and effects that EDS have on social and economic life, on intrapsychic and relational aspects, on youth movements, and on the relevant changes affecting nutrition and the environment. In particular, we aim to collect papers on every aspect related to ED and not only on clinical aspects; articles proposed on the relationship between ED and current events (e.g. COVID-19, migration, politics, environment, etc.) will be preferred, on topics including:

  • ED and impact on social and/or economic life;
  • ED and the body (fashion, body image, other body symptoms such as self-injurious behaviors, body dysmorphic disorder, and so on);
  • ED and sexuality;
  • ED family;
  • Prevention program;
  • ED and technologies;
  • ED on the web;
  • ED and femininity;
  • ED and adolescence;
  • ED epidemiology among migrants;
  • ED and asceticism.

Dr. Paolo Cotrufo
Dr. Stefania Cella
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • anorexia
  • bulimia
  • binge eating disorder
  • parental bondings
  • eating disorders and socialization
  • eds and nutrition
  • intrapsychic
  • eds and gender studies
  • eds and lock-down
  • eds and migration

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Intergenerational Transmission of Child Feeding Practices
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8183; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18158183 - 02 Aug 2021
Viewed by 441
Abstract
This study assessed the relationships between parents’ retrospective recollections of their mothers’ child feeding practices (CFP), current disordered eating (DE) and current CFP (how they now feed their children). 174 Israeli parents (136 mothers, 38 fathers; 40.1 ± 6.9 years of age) of [...] Read more.
This study assessed the relationships between parents’ retrospective recollections of their mothers’ child feeding practices (CFP), current disordered eating (DE) and current CFP (how they now feed their children). 174 Israeli parents (136 mothers, 38 fathers; 40.1 ± 6.9 years of age) of children between the ages of 2 and 18, living at home, completed questionnaires online assessing demographics, retrospective recollections of the CFP that their mothers used when they were children, current CFP and current DE. Specific aspects of retrospectively recalled maternal CFP were significantly associated with the same aspects of current CFP. Current DE mediated the association between retrospectively recalled maternal CFP and current CFP and moderated the association between current concern about child’s weight and pressure for child to eat. Results highlight that the way adults pass on their feeding practices to their children is strongly influenced by their childhood recollections of their mothers’ concern about their weight, pressure for them to eat or restriction of their food intake. People often strive to behave differently from their parents, especially in the realm of food and eating. However, our findings suggest that parental CFP can become entrenched and can be passed on to our children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Related Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Self-Esteem and Binge Eating among Adolescent Boys and Girls: The Role of Body Disinvestment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7496; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147496 - 14 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 733
Abstract
Although low self-esteem and body disinvestment have been recognized as potential risk factors for disordered eating, no studies have explored how these factors may work together to predict binge eating in adolescents. Therefore, we hypothesized a path model for girls and boys separately [...] Read more.
Although low self-esteem and body disinvestment have been recognized as potential risk factors for disordered eating, no studies have explored how these factors may work together to predict binge eating in adolescents. Therefore, we hypothesized a path model for girls and boys separately to investigate whether the body’s investment dimensions (feelings towards the body, physical touch, body care, body protection) mediate the relationship between self-esteem and binge eating, and age moderate such relationships. Participants were 1046 Italian students aged between 11 and 19 years (472 girls, Mage = 14.17; 574 boys, Mage = 14.60) screened through self-report measures. Both models showed an acceptable fit (males: χ2(22) = 30.441; RMSEA = 0.026; CFI = 0.99; TLI = 0.97; SRMR = 0.023; females: χ2(22) = 34.723; RMSEA = 0.35; CFI = 0.98; TLI = 0.95; SRMR = 0.029). Negative body feelings and reduced body protection fully mediated the relationship between self-esteem and binge eating, regardless of gender. Our findings highlight the importance of interventions promoting body emotional investment to reduce adolescents’ vulnerability to binge eating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Related Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Two to Tango? The Dance of Maternal Authority and Feeding Practices with Child Eating Behavior
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1650; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041650 - 09 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 914
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between maternal feeding practices and children’s eating problems. Mothers of 292 children aged 5.9 ± 1.1, 50% boys, reported online on parental authority, overt and covert control of the child’s food choices, child [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between maternal feeding practices and children’s eating problems. Mothers of 292 children aged 5.9 ± 1.1, 50% boys, reported online on parental authority, overt and covert control of the child’s food choices, child feeding practices, and their child’s problematic eating behavior. Structural equation modelling yielded a model with excellent indices of fit (χ(2)(52) = 50.72, p = 0.56; normed fit index (NFI) = 0.94; root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.001). The model showed that an authoritarian maternal authority style was associated with overt control, which was associated with maternal tendency to pressure children to eat and with maternal restriction of highly processed or calorie-rich snack foods. These, in turn, were positively associated with the child’s satiety response, food fussiness, and slow eating, and negatively with the child’s enjoyment of food. In contrast, a permissive maternal authority style was associated with covert control of the child’s eating, concern over the child being overweight, and the restriction of highly processed and calorie-rich snack foods, which were in turn positively associated with the child’s emotional overeating and the child’s food responsiveness. The model seems to tap into two distinct patterns of mother-child feeding and eating dynamics, apparently related to children with opposing appetitive tendencies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Related Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop