Special Issue "Psychological Risk Factors for Road Safety"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Sergio A. Useche
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety, University of Valencia, C/ Serpis 29, 3rd Floor, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: transportation; applied psychology; professional driving; non-motorized transportation; psychosocial risk factors; stress; fatigue; risky behaviors; transport policy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Luis Montoro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety (INTRAS), University of Valencia,C/Serpis 29, INTRAS, 46002 Valencia, Spain
Interests: traffic psychology; road safety; public health; human factors; driving behavior; autonomous vehicles; alternative transportation; road training; public transportation.

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

While the “Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011–2020” is close to completion, having brought with it several advances in crash prevention and sustainable mobility across many countries, new challenges for road user’s protection and welfare are emerging worldwide. In this regard, among the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) included in the “2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” of the United Nations, two of these core goals directly highlight the need to keep active all the efforts put in strengthening road safety, which remains a significant public health challenge.

One of the key spheres that many studies have marked as a major contributor to road crashes is precisely the human factor, among which psychological issues seem to play a crucial role for both explaining and preventing road causalities, helping practitioners to reduce adverse outcomes in road safety, such as the high burden they represent for healthcare systems, and the injuries and deaths to which road users are exposed. Further, several psychosocial risk factors, also influenced by social changes, developmental trends, and new technologies have been shown to impact our perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors on the road, and further empirically supported actions are needed.

Hence, this Special Issue aims to collect research experiences performed in different contexts that give a significant role to psychological risk factors on road safety issues, serving as the outlet for international relevant basic and applied research in traffic psychology and human factors.

Researchers are encouraged to submit their papers attending key aspects of road safety from psychosocial perspectives, approached through different research methods. Papers addressing the development and validation of new instruments and tools for traffic psychology and multidisciplinary road safety approaches are particularly welcome.

 

Prof. Sergio A. Useche
Prof. Luis Montoro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • traffic psychology
  • road safety
  • risk factors
  • road behavior
  • driving (drivers)
  • walking (pedestrians)
  • cycling (cyclists)
  • commuting
  • risk factors
  • traffic crash prevention
  • risk groups
  • road transport

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Mobile Phone Use on Driving Performance: An Experimental Study of Workload and Traffic Violations
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7101; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137101 - 02 Jul 2021
Viewed by 383
Abstract
The use of communication technologies, e.g., mobile phones, has increased dramatically in recent years, and their use among drivers has become a great risk to traffic safety. The present study assessed the workload and road ordinary violations, utilizing driving data collected from 39 [...] Read more.
The use of communication technologies, e.g., mobile phones, has increased dramatically in recent years, and their use among drivers has become a great risk to traffic safety. The present study assessed the workload and road ordinary violations, utilizing driving data collected from 39 young participants who underwent a dual-task while driving a simulator, i.e., respond to a call, text on WhatsApp, and check Instagram. Findings confirmed that there are significant differences in the driving performance of young drivers in terms of vehicle control (i.e., lateral distance and hard shoulder line violations) between distracted and non-distracted drivers. Furthermore, the overall workload score of young drivers increases with the use of their mobile phones while driving. The obtained results contribute to a better understanding of the driving performance of distracted young drivers and thus they could be useful for further improvements to traffic safety strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Risk Factors for Road Safety)
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Article
Processes of a Transformation of Young Drivers’ Responsibility for Health—Carpe Diem
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3634; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18073634 - 31 Mar 2021
Viewed by 512
Abstract
Research most often deals with the relationship between risky behaviour on the road and other aspects of young adults’ lifestyle. It is rare that the sense of responsibility for one’s own life and health and for that of other people on the road [...] Read more.
Research most often deals with the relationship between risky behaviour on the road and other aspects of young adults’ lifestyle. It is rare that the sense of responsibility for one’s own life and health and for that of other people on the road is understood, due to the limitation of perceptual data. In this study, we researched 198 young adults (M = 19.75; SD = 1.11) using the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control, the Inventory of Health Behaviours, the Criteria of Health List and a student health survey. The chance of risky driving will increase by 50.7% among young adults as their understanding of health as a state increases. On the other hand, when young people feel that others are responsible for their lives, the likelihood of risky driving will drop by 6.4%. The hedonistic life orientation of a young adult had a significant impact on the results obtained which was connected with their understanding of health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Risk Factors for Road Safety)
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Article
Bicycle Rider Behavior and Crash Involvement in Australia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2378; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18052378 - 01 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 695
Abstract
This research investigated how behaviours and attitudes of bicycle riders influence crash frequency and severity. The study recruited 1102 Australian bicycle riders for an online survey. The survey comprised questions on demographics, frequency of riding and the number and severity of traffic crashes [...] Read more.
This research investigated how behaviours and attitudes of bicycle riders influence crash frequency and severity. The study recruited 1102 Australian bicycle riders for an online survey. The survey comprised questions on demographics, frequency of riding and the number and severity of traffic crashes during the last five years. The survey included the Cycling Behaviour Questionnaire and the Cyclist Risk Perception and Regulation Scale. Overall, there were low levels of errors and violations reported by participants indicating that these behaviours were on average never or rarely exhibited while riding a bicycle. Conversely, participants reported high levels of engagement in positive behaviours and reported high levels of traffic rule knowledge and risk perception. Higher rates of violations and errors were associated with increased crash likelihood, while higher rates of positive behaviours were associated with reduced rates of crash involvement in a period of 5 years. The findings highlight the relationship between errors, total crashes and crash severity Further promotion of positive behaviours amongst riders may also help to reduce the risk of crashes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Risk Factors for Road Safety)
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Article
Socioeconomic Status, Health and Lifestyle Settings as Psychosocial Risk Factors for Road Crashes in Young People: Assessing the Colombian Case
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 886; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18030886 - 20 Jan 2021
Viewed by 753
Abstract
The social determinants of health influence both psychosocial risks and protective factors, especially in high-demanding contexts, such as the mobility of drivers and non-drivers. Recent evidence suggests that exploring socioeconomic status (SES), health and lifestyle-related factors might contribute to a better understanding of [...] Read more.
The social determinants of health influence both psychosocial risks and protective factors, especially in high-demanding contexts, such as the mobility of drivers and non-drivers. Recent evidence suggests that exploring socioeconomic status (SES), health and lifestyle-related factors might contribute to a better understanding of road traffic crashes (RTCs). Thus, the aim of this study was to construct indices for the assessment of crash rates and mobility patterns among young Colombians who live in the central region of the country. The specific objectives were developing SES, health and lifestyle indices, and assessing the self-reported RTCs and mobility features depending on these indices. A sample of 561 subjects participated in this cross-sectional study. Through a reduction approach of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), three indices were constructed. Mean and frequency differences were contrasted for the self-reported mobility, crash rates, age, and gender. As a result, SES, health and lifestyle indices explained between 56.3–67.9% of the total variance. Drivers and pedestrians who suffered crashes had higher SES. A healthier lifestyle is associated with cycling, but also with suffering more bike crashes; drivers and those reporting traffic crashes have shown greater psychosocial and lifestyle-related risk factors. Regarding gender differences, men are more likely to engage in road activities, as well as to suffer more RTCs. On the other hand, women present lower healthy lifestyle-related indices and a less active implication in mobility. Protective factors such as a high SES and a healthier lifestyle are associated with RTCs suffered by young Colombian road users. Given the differences found in this regard, a gender perspective for understanding RTCs and mobility is highly suggestible, considering that socio-economic gaps seem to differentially affect mobility and crash-related patterns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Risk Factors for Road Safety)
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