Special Issue "Global Warming & Water"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Elena Maria Otazo Sánchez
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Chemistry Dept. Institute of Engineering and Basic Science, Hidalgo State Autonomous University, Pachuca, Hidalgo State 42184, Mexico

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health calling for contributions about the global change effects on water events, either scarceness or flooding, which impacts on all aspects of society. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/ijerph.

According to IPCC, climate change has dramatic effects on water resources. Nowadays, scientific evidence shows that global warming is occurring, and the most critical effects are observed in water quantity and quality. High temperatures increase evaporation that rises precipitation causing huge storms and floods. In contrast, the drought severity impacts agriculture and food security, imbalances ecosystems, and affects human/animal health. Water management practices are quite advanced in developed countries, but others make efforts to overcome the challenges.

With this Special Issue, we invite you to submit high-quality original research articles or reviews to extend the current state of knowledge. Those include technical and social findings. All manuscripts will be peer-reviewed by experts in the field and would be due no later than the end of August 2020.

Dr. Elena Maria Otazo Sánchez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Floods and scarcity
  • Water management
  • Basin studies
  • Ecosystems
  • Water balance scenarios
  • Health effects
  • Adaptation
  • Greenhouse Gases
  • Mitigation actions
  • Social studies

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Psychological and Situational Variables Associated with Objective Knowledge on Water-Related Issues in a Northern Spanish City
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3213; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063213 - 19 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 611
Abstract
This study brings together the level of objective knowledge on water-related issues and other variables of psychological and situational nature. A random sample of 459 participants was employed, selected proportionally based on sex and age. In this sample, knowledge on the water-related issues [...] Read more.
This study brings together the level of objective knowledge on water-related issues and other variables of psychological and situational nature. A random sample of 459 participants was employed, selected proportionally based on sex and age. In this sample, knowledge on the water-related issues tended to be low, particularly related to the direct source of water in the household, the type of services involved in the management, and consumption itself. In order to understand both the relationship with knowledge on water and the relative importance of all the other factors, a regression model was formulated. The highest standardised effect was for sex, followed by occupation, political leaning, and water-related emotions. The best level of knowledge was attained if the residents were male, if they were actively employed or unemployed, if their political leaning was towards the left, and if they demonstrated greater emotional involvement with the water use. Consequently, the design of programmes would need to consider that the information flow must be greater for citizens as a whole, particularly for certain groups such as women and students. It should contribute to the realistic perception of water as a problem and to seek emotional involvement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Warming & Water)
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Article
Water Availability–Demand Balance under Climate Change Scenarios in an Overpopulated Region of Mexico
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1846; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041846 - 14 Feb 2021
Viewed by 781
Abstract
Climate change scenarios show that water availability could be decreasing in the near future, adding to the increasing problem of the growing water demands in socioeconomic sectors. The aim of this work was to generate a geographically explicit water balance concerning availability vs. [...] Read more.
Climate change scenarios show that water availability could be decreasing in the near future, adding to the increasing problem of the growing water demands in socioeconomic sectors. The aim of this work was to generate a geographically explicit water balance concerning availability vs. demand in an overpopulated region of Mexico. Water balance and water deficit models were made for three periods of time: 1970–2000, and two future periods of time (2041–2060 and 2061–2080). Three global climate models were used in addition to two different climate scenarios from each (Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) RCP 4.6 and RCP 8.5). Water demand for socioeconomic sectors was calculated through the water footprint. Water availability was 197,644.58 hm3/year, while that the water demand was 59,187 hm3/year. The socioeconomic sectors with the highest demand were domestic services (48%), agriculture (27%), livestock agriculture (20%), and timber production (5%). The highest water availability areas were not the same as those with the highest demand and vice versa. However, 39% of municipalities had a higher water demand than its availability. A significant reduction in water availability was identified, considering an interval of −15% to 40%. This variation depends on climate models, scenarios, and period of time. Areas with overpopulated cities in the region would have higher pressure on water availability. These results could be used in the implementation of public policies by focusing on adaptation strategies to reduce water deficit in the immediate future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Warming & Water)
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Article
The Spatial-Temporal Variation Characteristics of Natural Vegetation Drought in the Yangtze River Source Region, China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1613; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041613 - 08 Feb 2021
Viewed by 613
Abstract
In the context of climate change, ecosystem in Yangtze River Source Region (YRSR) is under threat from severe droughts. This study introduced a new natural vegetation drought index, standardized supply-demand water index (SSDI), and identified natural vegetation drought events and parameters (e.g., duration, [...] Read more.
In the context of climate change, ecosystem in Yangtze River Source Region (YRSR) is under threat from severe droughts. This study introduced a new natural vegetation drought index, standardized supply-demand water index (SSDI), and identified natural vegetation drought events and parameters (e.g., duration, severity, peak, and coverage area) based on run theory. Then the drought-prone regions were investigated via 2-dimensional joint copula. The results indicate that (1) compared with traditional meteorological drought index, the SSDI is reliable and can reflect the comprehensive characteristics of the ecological drought information more easily and effectively; (2) the YRSR had witnessed the most severe drought episodes in the periods of late-1970s, mid-1980s, and mid-1990s, but the SSDI showed a wetting trend since the mid-2000s. Additionally, droughts in the Southern YRSR were relatively more severe with longer drought duration; (3) in most areas of Togton River Basin and Dam River Basin, the severe ecological drought events occurred more frequently; (4) drought duration and severity in the YRSR were more susceptible to temperature when the temperature rise was above 1.0 °C. The average drought duration and severity increased by 20.7% and 32.6% with a temperature rise of 1 °C. Investigating and evaluating drought characteristics, causes, and drought index effectiveness provide essential information for balanced water resource allocation, utilization, and drought prevention. Understanding these spatial-temporal characteristics of drought and return period was useful for drought risk assessment and sustainable development of water resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Warming & Water)
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Review

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Review
Water–Food Nexus Assessment in Agriculture: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4983; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094983 - 07 May 2021
Viewed by 632
Abstract
The Water–Food Nexus (WF) has been proposed to reach equitable, balanced, and sustainable access to water and food resources in the face of the growing population demand. Therefore, developing models to assess them has become more relevant. This work systematically reviews the literature [...] Read more.
The Water–Food Nexus (WF) has been proposed to reach equitable, balanced, and sustainable access to water and food resources in the face of the growing population demand. Therefore, developing models to assess them has become more relevant. This work systematically reviews the literature on the tools used to evaluate water and food resources between 2002 and 2020. Furthermore, it reports a critical analysis of the software used to assess the WF Nexus quantitatively. The models analyzed were Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Common Agricultural Policy Regional Impact (CAPRI), Global Food and Water System (GFWS), Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), Water Evaluation And Planning system (WEAP), and Soil Water Atmosphere Plant (SWAP). We deduced that the following are necessary in evaluating the WF Nexus: (1) the capacity to generate future scenarios, (2) a global application, and (3) the application in case studies. The present paper is the first review to provide an overview of the software applied to evaluate WF Nexus, including the advantages and disadvantages of the tools found. They can help build sustainability criteria when designing policies that reduce water and food security risks and promote efficient water and food use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Warming & Water)
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Review
Environment Changes, Aflatoxins, and Health Issues, a Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7850; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17217850 - 27 Oct 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1948
Abstract
Crops contaminated by aflatoxins (AFs), the toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxins produced namely by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, have severe impacts on human health. Changes in temperature and water availability related to actual climate changes (increased temperature, heavy rainfalls, and droughts) are [...] Read more.
Crops contaminated by aflatoxins (AFs), the toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxins produced namely by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, have severe impacts on human health. Changes in temperature and water availability related to actual climate changes (increased temperature, heavy rainfalls, and droughts) are modulating factors of mould growth and production of mycotoxins. To protect human and animal health from the harmful effects caused by AFs, the development of a safe and effective multifaceted approach in combating food and feed contamination with AFs is necessary. This review aims to collect and analyze the available information regarding AF presence in food and feed to reinforce AF management and to prevent health issues related to the AF exposure in the light of actual climate changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Warming & Water)
Review
Carbon Fluxes and Stocks by Mexican Tropical Forested Wetland Soils: A Critical Review of Its Role for Climate Change Mitigation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7372; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17207372 - 09 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1177
Abstract
Wetland soils are important stores of soil carbon (C) in the biosphere, and play an important role in global carbon cycles in the response strategy to climate change. However, there areknowledge gaps in our understanding of the quantity and distribution in tropical regions. [...] Read more.
Wetland soils are important stores of soil carbon (C) in the biosphere, and play an important role in global carbon cycles in the response strategy to climate change. However, there areknowledge gaps in our understanding of the quantity and distribution in tropical regions. Specifically, Mexican wetlands have not been considered in global carbon budgets or carbon balances for a number of reasons, such as: (1) the lack of data, (2) Spanish publications have not been selected, or (3) because such balances are mainly made in the English language. This study analyzes the literature regarding carbon stocks, sequestration and fluxes in Mexican forested wetlands (Forest-W). Soil carbon stocks of 8, 24.5 and 40.1 kg cm−2 were detected for flooded palms, mangroves, and freshwater or swamps (FW) wetland soils, respectively, indicating that FW soils are the Forest-W with more potential for carbon sinks (p = 0.023), compared to mangroves and flooded palm soils. While these assessments of carbon sequestration were ranged from 36 to 920 g-C m−2 year−1, C emitted as methane was also tabulated (0.6–196 g-C m−2 year−1). Subtracting the C emitted of the C sequestered, 318.2 g-C m−2 year−1 were obtained. Such data revealed that Forest-W function is mainly as carbon sink, and not C source. This review can help to inform practitioners in future decisions regarding sustainable projects, restoration, conservation or creation of wetlands. Finally, it is concluded that Forest-W could be key ecosystems in strategies addressing the mitigation of climate change through carbon storage. However, new studies in this research line and public policies that protect these essential carbon sinks are necessary in order to, hopefully, elaborate global models to make more accurate predictions about future climate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Warming & Water)
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