Special Issue "Health and Fitness Outcomes from High Intensity Group Training"

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Katie M. Heinrich
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Functional Intensity Training Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
Interests: high intensity functional training; tactical athletes; exercise interventions; physical activity and obesity policy; built environment; active transportation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Derek A. Crawford
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Nutrition, Kinesiology, and Psychological Science, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO 64093, USA
Interests: high-intensity function training; exercise behavior; psychophysiology; patient-centered outcomes

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Since 2007, the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) has conducted an annual survey to track fitness trends. High-intensity training (under the term high-intensity interval training; HIIT) has remained in the top 3 since 2014 and group-based training, after entering in the 6th place in 2017, has also remained in the top 3. This Special Issue is focused on the intersection of these two trends, aiming to better understand health- and fitness-related outcomes from participating in high-intensity group training. We welcome research focusing on the behavioral, social, psychological, and physiological contributions to exercise, sport, fitness, and public health resulting from these programs. Manuscripts might include original research, meta-analysis, PRISMA-framed reviews, and brief reports.

Prof. Katie M. Heinrich
Prof. Derek A. Crawford
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • high intensity
  • HIIT
  • high-intensity functional training (HIFT)
  • exercise
  • physical activity

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Network Analysis of the Social Environment Relative to Preference for and Tolerance of Exercise Intensity in CrossFit Gyms
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8370; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17228370 - 12 Nov 2020
Viewed by 963
Abstract
Known for its ability to improve fitness and health, high-intensity functional training (HIFT) focuses on functional movements completed at high intensities, often yielding outcomes superior to repetitive aerobic workouts. Preference for and tolerance of high-intensity exercise are associated with enjoyment of and adherence [...] Read more.
Known for its ability to improve fitness and health, high-intensity functional training (HIFT) focuses on functional movements completed at high intensities, often yielding outcomes superior to repetitive aerobic workouts. Preference for and tolerance of high-intensity exercise are associated with enjoyment of and adherence to HIFT. Similarly, the social environment present within CrossFit, a popular group-based HIFT modality, is important to the enjoyment of and adherence to HIFT. This study aimed to test whether preference and tolerance were related to social connections within CrossFit networks. Linear network autocorrelation models (LNAMs) and exponential random graph models (ERGMs) were computed on sociometric and attribute data from members of three CrossFit networks (n = 197). LNAMs showed the preference and tolerance scores of someone’s social connections were associated with their own in all three gyms, and ERGMs demonstrated preference and tolerance scores were associated with the presence of social ties within all networks. This study is the first to provide evidence for a relationship between social connections and preference and tolerance. Future longitudinal research is needed to determine if the social environment may influence and optimize a person’s preference of and tolerance for HIFT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health and Fitness Outcomes from High Intensity Group Training)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop