Special Issue "Health Humanities: Social Determinants of Access to Healthcare in Migrant and Minority Populations"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Adams Bodomo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
African Studies Department, University of Vienna, Spitalgasse 2, Court 5.1, 1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: health humanities; linguistics; literature; diaspora studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) is one of the most important outlets for cutting-edge research on Public Health and the environment in which it is practiced. It has a high impact factor of 2.849 (2019) and it is highly visible as it is listed in the following key indices: Science Citation Index Expanded (Web of Science), Social Sciences Citation Index (Web of Science), MEDLINE (PubMed), and Scopus (Elsevier).

The world is currently experiencing a public health crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic which, after almost a year from its start, is still not fully understood. This emphasizes the need for a multidisciplinary approach to understanding public health problems.

This Special Issue of IJERPH focuses on health humanities, a new, emerging multidisciplinary research topic in public health. Health humanities is an interdisciplinary area of study that interrogates how the different components of the Humanities such as Linguistics, Literature, History, Philosophy, Music, Anthropology and Sociology among others contribute to a better understanding of Public Health in the area of diagnosis, treatment, and care for members of the society. The main theme of this Special Issue, titled “Health Humanities: Social Determinants of Access to Healthcare in Migrant and Minority Populations”, is access to healthcare in less privileged societies. This collection will feature papers that discuss some of the social issues that affect access to healthcare by diaspora, indigenous, and minority populations around the world, in places such as Africa, Asia, South America, and the Global South in general, but also in areas of the Global North, such as Europe and North America. Papers

  1. will address contemporary interdisciplinary approaches to finding solutions for the management of infectious diseases that develop into epidemics, such as ebola, and pandemics, such as COVID-19.
  2. will be expected to fit into the scope of health humanities, distinguished from medical humanities and including interdisciplinary humanities and public health disciplines.

A few of the questions that might be addressed are:

Language, communication, and public health: How are specific public health terminologies expressed in minority languages? How does one express health and well-being in these languages? How do we communicate measures to contain pandemics in minority populations?

History and public health: What lessons can we learn from a study of past pandemics?

Literature and public health: How have literary works in diaspora and minority populations represented healthcare experiences in these populations?

Anthropology, sociology, and public health: How do certain key socio-cultural beliefs affect the management of pandemics in diaspora and minority populations?

Prof. Dr. Adams Bodomo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Healthcare
  • Pandemics
  • Infectious diseases
  • Health humanities
  • Language
  • Linguistics
  • History
  • Literature
  • Anthropology
  • COVID-19

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Basic Public Health Service Utilization by Internal Older Adult Migrants in China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 270; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18010270 - 01 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1048
Abstract
Since 2009, the Chinese government has launched a basic public health services (BPHS) equalization program to provide the same BPHS to all the citizens. However, utilization of BPHS among older migrants is still low. The purpose of this paper was to explore the [...] Read more.
Since 2009, the Chinese government has launched a basic public health services (BPHS) equalization program to provide the same BPHS to all the citizens. However, utilization of BPHS among older migrants is still low. The purpose of this paper was to explore the determinant individual and contextual factors of older migrants’ utilization of BPHS, and to provide suggestion for the government to improve BPHS utilization. Based on Andersen’s model of health services use, data from the China’s Regional Economic Statistics Yearbook 2014 and National Health and Family Planning Dynamic Monitoring Survey on Migrant Population 2015 were analyzed using a hierarchical random intercept model for binary outcomes. Results showed that the percentage of migrant older adults receiving free physical examinations, which is an important item of BPHS, was 36.2%. Predisposing (education, hukou, living duration in the host city, and scope of migration), enabling (health insurance and social networks), and need (self-rated health and chronic conditions) factors of individuals’ characteristics had significant impact on the use of BPHS. The proportions of both migrant children enrolled in public schools and people with established health records had a positive impact on an individual’s chance of receiving free physical examinations. These findings suggest that economic development and improvement at the level of the city’s health resources cannot effectively improve access to BPHS by older adult migrants. Instead, the driving force appears to be supportive policies for the migrant population. Full article
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Article
If the Coronavirus Doesn’t Scare You, the Banners Will—A Case Study of Early COVID-19 Banners
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9595; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249595 - 21 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1086
Abstract
As a crucial element of China’s political and cultural life, “banners”, or biāoyǔ, have been around for decades, in support of national-level policies such as family planning and the governing mottos of Presidents. The banners that have emerged during the Covid-19 pandemic which [...] Read more.
As a crucial element of China’s political and cultural life, “banners”, or biāoyǔ, have been around for decades, in support of national-level policies such as family planning and the governing mottos of Presidents. The banners that have emerged during the Covid-19 pandemic which was also the subject of a national-level driven policy, have been involved in a nation-wide public debate over the language styles of banners used to urge people to stay indoors. Based on the analysis of the early COVID-19 banners and the related online comments, this article analyzes the language style patterns of the banners and the mode of banner circulation. The study found that the manner in which the banners are circulated goes beyond a unidirectional path of on-site instant communication. This process is facilitated by social networks and mass media, which, during circulation, twice created a banner upgrade. The upgrades created decontextualization and function extension of the banners, whereas audience feedback triggered an adaptive adjustment of the language style of the banners. This article suggests that the study of the use and spread of banners, especially the early COVID-19 banners, sheds light on the study of mass communication and discourse style, and also how measures to contain pandemics such as COVID-19 can be communicated. Full article
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