Special Issue "New Advances in Workplace Health Promotion"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Marguerite C Sendall
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Heallth and Social Work, Facilty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland 4059, Australia
Interests: workplace health promotion; nutrition and physical activity; hard-to-reach groups such as truckies; bus drivers and miners; digital technologies; health outcomes
Prof. Cameron Newton
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Management, Queensland University of Technology, Z917, Z Block, Australia
Interests: organisational culture/identification and effectiveness; occupational stress and decision making; nonprofit organisation research
Prof. Dr. Kristy Sanderson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7TJ, UK
Interests: workplace health promotion; mental health; sleep; shiftwork; first responders; health care workforce

Special Issue Information

This Special Issue is titled ‘New Advances in Workplace Health Promotion’. The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is a peer-reviewed scientific publication publishing communication and empirical research in the interdisciplinary environmental health science and public health field. More information can be found at https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/ijerph

According to the World Health Organisation (2020), chronic disease is the leading cause of death globally claiming 36 million lives, or 63% of all deaths, each year. Most chronic disease deaths are due to cardiovascular disease, cancers, respiratory diseases, and diabetes. The modifiable risk factors for chronic disease are 1) poor nutrition, 2) physical inactivity, and 3) tobacco use. Chronic diseases are projected to contribute increasingly to the global burden of ill-health.

Workplace culture, defined by systems, structures, and policies, can influence healthy or unhealthy behaviors and choices affecting workers’ health outcomes. Workers spend up to 60% of waking hours at work, which makes workplaces a perfect place to promote healthy behaviors. Health promotion in the workplace has the potential to impact workers’ health behaviors and outcomes.

However, we have a limited understanding of the complex and nuanced relationship between workplace culture and health promotion. In particular, we have little understanding of effective contemporary health promotion interventions using digital technologies.

This Special Issue offers authors the opportunity to publish high-quality multidisciplinary empirical research and reviews that focus on the systems, structures, policies, and culture of healthy behavior change and health promotion in the workplace. Your original manuscript or rigorous systematic review will excite contemporary thought endeavors to better understand the complexity of healthy behavior change and health promotion in the context of workplace culture. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed designs are welcome.

Manuscripts can focus on but are not limited to the following topics:

  • Populations such as hard-to-reach, at-risk groups like truck and bus drivers, builders, and construction workers, farmers, and miners.
  • Contexts such as managers and management and policy and procedure.
  • Risk factors such as poor nutrition, a lack of physical activity, tobacco use, and drinking alcohol at hazardous levels.
  • Interventions or narrative inquiries about digital and smart technologies or social media.

Manuscripts with robust theoretical frameworks such as models of healthy behavior change, a translational science focus, such as action research, or using innovative research methods are welcome.

If you research on these topics, you are invited to submit manuscripts for consideration for this Special Issue in IJERPH.

Dr. Marguerite C Sendall
Prof. Cameron Newton
Prof. Kristy Sanderson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • public health 
  • population health 
  • health promotion 
  • work 
  • workers 
  • workplace 
  • managers 
  • culture 
  • environment 
  • health 
  • wellbeing 
  • risk factors 
  • chronic disease 
  • sitting 
  • sedentary 
  • nutrition 
  • physical activity 
  • interventions 
  • behaviour change 
  • health outcomes 
  • digital technologies 
  • smart technologies 
  • social media

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
University Staff and Students’ Attitudes towards a Completely Smoke-Free Campus: Shifting Social Norms and Organisational Culture for Health Promotion
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7104; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137104 - 02 Jul 2021
Viewed by 436
Abstract
A large university in Queensland, Australia with a diverse staff and student community introduced a campus wide smoke-free policy in 2016. The purpose of this enquiry was to understand attitudes about a new smoke-free policy, its potential impact and the shift in social [...] Read more.
A large university in Queensland, Australia with a diverse staff and student community introduced a campus wide smoke-free policy in 2016. The purpose of this enquiry was to understand attitudes about a new smoke-free policy, its potential impact and the shift in social norms and organizational culture to inform the next phase of implementation. An electronic survey was distributed to all staff and students approximately 12 weeks after the smoke-free policy was implemented. The survey consisted of multiple-choice questions about demographics, smoking behaviour, attitudes towards smoking and tobacco control, awareness of the smoke-free policy, and attitudes towards the effect of a completely smoke-free campus on quality of life, learning and enrolment. The survey was completed by 641 university staff and students. Respondents reported seeking out (80.4%) and socialising in smoke-free environments (86.6%) and supported smoke-free buildings (96.1%), indoor areas (91.6%), and outdoor areas (79%). The results revealed overwhelming support for a completely smoke-free campus (83%) and minority support for designated smoking areas (31%). Overall, respondents reflected positively towards a campus wide smoke-free policy. These findings suggest Queensland’s early adoption of tobacco control laws influenced the social environment, de-normalised smoking, changed behaviour, preference for smoke-free environments and shifted social norms. These findings provide convincing evidence for organisational change and suggest health promotion policy makers should progress the implementation of smoke-free policies nationally across the higher education sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Workplace Health Promotion)
Article
Effects of Substituting Types of Physical Activity on Body Fat Mass and Work Efficiency among Workers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5101; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105101 - 12 May 2021
Viewed by 537
Abstract
Low levels of physical activity (PA) not only increase healt h risks but also affect employee productivity. Although daily activity is interdependent with work productivity and personal health, few studies have examined how substituting physical activities would affect health and work efficiency. The [...] Read more.
Low levels of physical activity (PA) not only increase healt h risks but also affect employee productivity. Although daily activity is interdependent with work productivity and personal health, few studies have examined how substituting physical activities would affect health and work efficiency. The present study aimed to investigate how substituting sedentary behaviors (SB) with increased PA and increasing the intensity of low-level activities during waking times affects the body fat mass and work efficiency of employees. Data were collected from 224 Japanese employees. SB, light physical activity (LPA), moderate physical activity (MPA), and vigorous physical activity (VPA) were measured using a tri-axial accelerometer, and body fat mass and work efficiency were also assessed. Analyses of the effects of substituting behaviors were based on the methods used in the isotemporal substitution model. Body fat mass decreased after substituting behaviors for 30 min per day: from SB to VPA (β = −4.800, 95% CI = −7.500; −2.100), from LPA to VPA (β = −4.680, 95% CI = −7.350; −1.980), and from MPA to VPA (β = −4.920, 95% CI = −7.680; −2.190). For work efficiency and physical activities, a higher work efficiency score was observed when substituting SB with LPA (β = 0.120, 95% CI = 0.030; 0.240), and a lower work efficiency score was observed when substituting LPA with VPA (β = −0.660, 95% CI = −1.350; −0.030). These results should help achieve greater results in promoting health and increasing work productivity by properly distributing and practicing daily physical activities during work hours. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Workplace Health Promotion)
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