Special Issue "Better Health Services and Preventive Interventions: eHealth"

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stefanie Maria Helmer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Health and Nursing Science, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Oudenarder Strasse 16, 13347 Berlin, Germany
Interests: prevention of risk behavior; health promotion; eHealth; mHealth; digital public health; youth; university students; implementation; innovative interventions

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

In recent years, eHealth has been proposed as a crucial tool in promoting better health care and prevention and the importance of eHealth has become increasingly evident. The COVID-19 pandemic additionally highlights the relevance of the availability of such services. Services and technologies such as mobile health apps, virtual reality, video consultation services, and social media have the potential to increase the quality of services and interventions, save costs, allow access from a distance and reduce barriers. Moreover, eHealth interventions are uniquely suited for personalization and tailoring of services and information to the individual needs of users. At the same time, they can be overly complex, time-consuming, and exclusive. Therefore, it is essential to learn more about eHealth services and preventive interventions, their effectiveness and implementation. Development of eHealth services and interventions not only requires a feasibility assessment and multi-disciplinary expertise, they further rely on user needs and acceptability. Diverse evaluation approaches, frameworks and tools co-exist to examine the effectiveness of eHealth that also take into account the complexity of technology. So far, little attention has been paid to the implementation of eHealth services and interventions in the real world. The implementation of eHealth needs to be analyzed in depth, since it may result in a loss of impact, harm for users, unnecessary costs, as well as the frustration or rejection of health care.

In this Special Issue, we aim to cover the full spectrum of eHealth-related research that includes theoretical, methodological, original qualitative and quantitative research, as well as review articles.

Dr. Stefanie Maria Helmer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eHealth
  • mHealth
  • prevention
  • health services
  • implementation
  • acceptability
  • evaluation
  • evidence-based

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Designing an eHealth Well-Being Program: A Participatory Design Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7250; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147250 - 06 Jul 2021
Viewed by 793
Abstract
In recent years, the relevance of eHealth interventions has become increasingly evident. However, a sequential procedural application to cocreating eHealth interventions is currently lacking. This paper demonstrates the implementation of a participatory design (PD) process to inform the design of an eHealth intervention [...] Read more.
In recent years, the relevance of eHealth interventions has become increasingly evident. However, a sequential procedural application to cocreating eHealth interventions is currently lacking. This paper demonstrates the implementation of a participatory design (PD) process to inform the design of an eHealth intervention aiming to enhance well-being. PD sessions were conducted with 57 people across four sessions. Within PD sessions participants experienced prototype activities, provided feedback and designed program interventions. A 5-week eHealth well-being intervention focusing on lifestyle, habits, physical activity, and meditation was proposed. The program is suggested to be delivered through online workshops and online community interaction. A five-step PD process emerged; namely, (1) collecting best practices, (2) participatory discovery, (3) initial proof-of-concept, (4) participatory prototyping, and (5) pilot intervention proof-of-concept finalisation. Health professionals, behaviour change practitioners and program planners can adopt this process to ensure end-user cocreation using the five-step process. The five-step PD process may help to create user-friendly programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Better Health Services and Preventive Interventions: eHealth)
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Article
Examining Protection Motivation and Network Externality Perspective Regarding the Continued Intention to Use M-Health Apps
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5684; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115684 - 26 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1046
Abstract
M-health apps have developed rapidly and are widely accepted, but users’ continued intention to use m-health apps has not been fully explored. This study was designed to obtain a better understanding of users’ continued intention to use m-health apps. We developed a theoretical [...] Read more.
M-health apps have developed rapidly and are widely accepted, but users’ continued intention to use m-health apps has not been fully explored. This study was designed to obtain a better understanding of users’ continued intention to use m-health apps. We developed a theoretical model by incorporating the protection motivation theory and network externalities and conducted an empirical study of a 368-respondent sample. The results showed that: (1) perceived vulnerability has a direct impact on users’ self-efficacy and response efficacy; (2) self-efficacy and response efficacy have a direct impact on users’ attitudes and continued intention; (3) network externalities affect users’ attitudes and continued intention, among which direct network externalities have an indirect impact on users’ continued intention through attitude; and (4) the impacts of self-efficacy, response efficacy, and indirect network externalities on continued intention are partially meditated by attitudes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Better Health Services and Preventive Interventions: eHealth)
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