Special Issue "Healthcare and Cardiovascular Diseases"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Youn-Jung Son
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974, Korea
Interests: heart failure; CAD; AF; health literacy; self-care behaviors; transitional care; healthy aging
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Mi Hwa Won
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan 54538, South Korea
Interests: CAD; physical activity; frailty; heart failure; atrial fibrillation; quality of life

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Cardiovascular diseases are the most common noncommunicable diseases globally. Even though the incidence of cardiovascular diases is stable, the prevalence has been increasing because of the aging population and improvements in treatment. This will cause further increases in hospitalization rates, poor quality of life and, consequently, in health care costs.

The International Journal of Environmental Research and Publich Health will dedicate a Special Issue of the journal to “Healthcare and Cardiovascular Diseases”. This Special Issue of the open access and peer-reviewed journal covers the broad field of cardiovascular health and care, including chronic and acute care, cardiac rehabilitation, primary and secondary prevention, heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, interventional cardiology, cardiac care, and vascular care. 

Our Special Issue will help to disseminate new research in the health and healthcare field to inform the work of health professionals. We invite submissions that report research using all research designs. We welcome reviews and studies that have the potential to change clinical care settings and health policy as well as public health areas.

We would like to invite you to submit a paper to this Special Issue on “Health and Cardiovascular Diseases”. We believe that your contribution would be fundamental to accurately convey to our readers the current research/clinical significance and advancements in this field.

Prof. Dr. Youn-Jung Son
Dr. Mi Hwa Won
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease epidemiology
  • Short and long-term outcomes of cardiovascular disease
  • Patient reported outcome in cardiovascular disease
  • Multidisciplinary intervention for cardiovascular disease
  • Disease management and preventions for cardiovascular disease
  • Mobile health technologies for people with cardiovascular disease
  • Cost and cost-effectiveness of intervention and policy in cardiovascular disease
  • Self-care behaviors and medication adherence of cardiovascular disease
  • Non-pharmacological interventions for cardiovascular disease
  • Palliative care/transitional care in cardiovascular disease

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
A Long-Term Incidence of Heart Failure and Predictors Following Newly Developed Acute Myocardial Infarction: A 10 Years Retrospective Cohort Study with Korean National Health Insurance Data
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6207; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126207 - 08 Jun 2021
Viewed by 590
Abstract
Heart failure (HF) is the major mechanism of mortality in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during early or intermediate post-AMI period. But heart failure is one of the most common long-term complications of AMI. Applied the retrospective cohort study design with nation representative population [...] Read more.
Heart failure (HF) is the major mechanism of mortality in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during early or intermediate post-AMI period. But heart failure is one of the most common long-term complications of AMI. Applied the retrospective cohort study design with nation representative population data, this study traced the incidence of late-onset heart failure since 1 year after newly developed acute myocardial infarction and assessed its risk factors. Methods and Results: Using the Korea National Health Insurance database, 18,328 newly developed AMI patients aged 40 years or older and first hospitalized in 2010 for 3 days or more, were set up as baseline cohort (12,403). The incidence rate of AMI per 100,000 persons was 79.8 overall, and 49.6 for women and 112.3 for men. A total of 2010 (1073 men, 937 women) were newly developed with HF during 6 years following post AMI. Cumulative incidences of HF per 1000 AMI patients for a year at each time period were 37.4 in initial hospitalization, 32.3 in 1 year after discharge, and 8.9 in 1–6 years. The overall and age-specific incidence rates of HF were higher in women than men. For late-onset HF, female, medical aid, pre-existing hypertension, severity of AMI, duration of hospital stay during index admission, reperfusion treatment, and drug prescription pattern including diuretics, affected the occurrence of late-onset HF. Conclusion: With respect to late-onset HF following AMI, appropriate management including hypertension and medical aid program in addition to quality improvement of AMI treatment are required to reduce the risk of late-onset heart failure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare and Cardiovascular Diseases)
Article
Sex Differences in the Association between Atrial Fibrillation and 90-Day Adverse Outcomes among Older Adults with Heart Failure: A Retrospective Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2237; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18052237 - 24 Feb 2021
Viewed by 691
Abstract
Sex differences in the prognostic impact of coexisting atrial fibrillation (AF) in older patients with heart failure (HF) have not been well-studied. This study, therefore, compared sex differences in the association between AF and its 90-day adverse outcomes (hospital readmissions and emergency room [...] Read more.
Sex differences in the prognostic impact of coexisting atrial fibrillation (AF) in older patients with heart failure (HF) have not been well-studied. This study, therefore, compared sex differences in the association between AF and its 90-day adverse outcomes (hospital readmissions and emergency room (ER) visits) among older adults with HF. Of the 250 older adult patients, the prevalence rates of coexisting AF between male and female HF patients were 46.0% and 31.0%, respectively. In both male and female older patients, patients with AF have a significantly higher readmission rate (male 46.0%, and female 34.3%) than those without AF (male 6.8%, and female 12.8%). However, there are no significant differences in the association between AF and ER visits in both male and female older HF patients. The multivariate logistic analysis showed that coexisting AF significantly increased the risk of 90-day hospital readmission in both male and female older patients. In addition, older age in males and longer periods of time after an HF diagnosis in females were associated with an increased risk of hospital readmission. Consequently, prospective cohort studies are needed to identify the impact of coexisting AF on short- and long-term outcomes in older adult HF patients by sex. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare and Cardiovascular Diseases)
Article
Metabolic Syndrome and Coronary Artery Disease Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1773; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041773 - 11 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 810
Abstract
Although numerous studies have described the link between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), no meta-analysis has been carried out on this relationship. Thus, the present study intended to address this limitation. A systematic search was carried out using electronic databases, [...] Read more.
Although numerous studies have described the link between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), no meta-analysis has been carried out on this relationship. Thus, the present study intended to address this limitation. A systematic search was carried out using electronic databases, such as PubMed, CINAHL Plus, Medline, and Web of Science. A sum of 10 studies (n = 9327) was incorporated in the meta-analysis. Compared with non-MetS, MetS was significantly associated with high CAD risk (OR = 4.03, 95% CI = 3.56–4.56). The MetS components were also significantly correlated with high CAD risk (OR = 3.72, 95% CI = 3.22–4.40). The presence of two (OR = 3.93, 95% CI = 2.81–5.49), three (OR = 4.09, 95% CI = 2.85–5.86), four (OR = 4.04, 95% CI = 2.83–5.78), or all five MetS components (OR = 3.92, 95% CI = 3.11–4.93), were significantly associated with a high risk of CAD. MetS and its individual or combined elements were linked with high CAD risk based on contemporary evidence. Thus, the assessment of MetS and its components might help identify people at a higher risk of advancing CAD in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare and Cardiovascular Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop