Special Issue "Incentivizing Healthy Behavior: Policies for Curbing Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Use and for Promoting Healthy Diets and Increased Physical Activity"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nigar Nargis
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Guest Editor
American Cancer Society, Economic and Health Policy Research, Atlanta, United States
Interests: health economics; labor economics; development economics; tobacco control; fiscal policies for controlling unhealthy behavior
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ce Shang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Interests: health economics; experimental economics; tobacco and alcohol control policies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Frank J. Chaloupka
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
University of Illinois at Chicago, Health Policy Center, Institute for Health Research and Policy Chicago, United States
Interests: the impact of economic; policy and other environmental influences on health behaviors; the economics of tobacco and tobacco control; particularly in developing countries
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Behavioral risk factors, such as tobacco, alcohol and drug use, unhealthy diet, and insufficient physical activity, reflected in individual action (or inaction), can be deleterious to one’s own health or that of others and disruptive to human life. While there are numerous psychosocial, economic, and environmental factors that can propel individuals to make unhealthy choices, solutions exist to help them to modify those risky behaviors as well. The use of choice experiments, nudges, and policy interventions to encourage healthy behaviors represents an important intersection between behavioral and clinical science. Existing literature demonstrates that setting the right incentives can effectively reduce consumption of tobacco, alcohol, drugs, and unhealthful diet and increase physical activity to generate enormous public health gain.         

With a view to enhancing evidence-based population-level interventions to promote healthy behavior, this Special Issue welcomes papers on emerging evidence on incentivizing healthier lifestyles with the following specific focus areas:

  • Effectiveness of government policies and actions at subnational, national, and global levels concerned with behavioral risk factors, such as, tobacco, alcohol and drug use, unhealthy diet, and insufficient physical activity;
  • Identification of gaps between evidence-based policy prescriptions and implementation in real-world settings;
  • Reviews of existing evidence on the effectiveness of government interventions and policy implementation gaps.

This Special Issue is intended to enhance a comprehensive understanding of the ways and means to address the global health challenges arising from individual risky behaviors that can be avoided through systematic public policy choices.

Disclaimer: We will not accept research funded in part or full by any tobacco companies in this Special Issue. For more details, please check: https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/1660-4601/15/12/2831/htm.

Dr. Nigar Nargis
Dr. Ce Shang
Prof. Dr. Frank J. Chaloupka
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • economics of risky behaviors and health
  • tobacco use and control
  • alcohol use, disorders amd control
  • drug abuse and control
  • unhealthy diet and obesity control
  • physical activity and health

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
The Impact of Cigarette Excise Tax Increases on Regular Drinking Behavior: Evidence from China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3327; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093327 - 11 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1025
Abstract
(1) Background: Many studies have shown that increasing taxation on cigarettes does play a role in tobacco control, but few studies have focused on whether increasing cigarette excise taxes significantly affects alcohol consumption. In this article, we aim to examine the effects of [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Many studies have shown that increasing taxation on cigarettes does play a role in tobacco control, but few studies have focused on whether increasing cigarette excise taxes significantly affects alcohol consumption. In this article, we aim to examine the effects of China’s 2015 increase in the cigarette excise tax on residents’ regular drinking behavior. (2) Methods: Using survey data from China Family Panel Studies (CFPS), we performed a panel logit regression analysis to model the relationship between the cigarette excise tax and regular drinking behavior. The Propensity Score Matching with Difference-in-Differences (PSM-DID) approach was adopted to determine the extent to which the cigarette excise tax affected residents’ drinking behavior. To test whether the cigarette excise tax could change regular drinking behavior by decreasing daily smoking quantity, we used an interaction term model. (3) Results: China’s 2015 increase in the cigarette excise tax had a significant negative effect on the probability of regular alcohol consumption among smokers, and the cigarette excise tax worked by reducing the average daily smoking of smokers. We also found that the regular drinking behavior of male smokers was more deeply affected by the increased cigarette excise tax than females. (4) Conclusions: Our research results not only give a deeper understanding of the impact of the cigarette excise tax, but also provide an important reference with which to guide future decisions concerning excise taxes imposed on cigarettes. Full article
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