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Special Issue "Impact of Environmental Levels of Bisphenol A on Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mariana F. Fernandez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Biomedical Research Center, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain. CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain.
Interests: Endocrine disruptors, Environmental medicine, hormone-related diseases, reproductive health, cancer
Dr. Nicolás Olea
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, and Biomedical Research Center, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: Endocrine disruptors, Environmental medicine, hormone-related diseases, reproductive health, cancer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The adverse effects of bisphenol-A (BPA) on human health is not a new issue, but particular concerns have recently been raised about the risk to the general population posed by environmental levels of this chemical. Available epidemiological evidence suggests that BPA exposure during critical periods of life can be hazardous for humans by targeting the reproductive system, brain, adipose tissue, and pancreas, among other organs. Thus, it has been proposed that BPA exposure during pregnancy and/or childhood may have a negative impact on neurobehavioral functioning in children and that this effect may be sexually dimorphic. Moreover, a growing number of studies support the role of BPA in the etiology of diabetes and other metabolic disorders. However, data on the association between BPA exposure and adverse male reproductive health outcomes remain limited and inconclusive. Although it is difficult to establish causal links based on epidemiological studies, increasing findings of a correlation between BPA and adverse effects in experimental models may support the proposition that environmental BPA levels are harmful to humans. The principal objective of this Special Issue is to review the current state of knowledge on the association of environmental BPA exposure with adverse health outcomes. Improved estimates of the causal effects of BPA exposure on health could help to identify susceptible subpopulations, guide public health interventions to reduce their exposure, and encourage the search for safer alternatives to BPA.

Dr. Mariana F. Fernandez
Dr. Nicolás Olea
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bisphenol A
  • Environmental levels
  • Neurodevelopment
  • Reproductive health
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • Thyroid
  • BPA regulation
  • Prevention
  • Bisphenol substitute

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Perceptions and Attitudes of Gynecologic and Pediatric Professionals Regarding Dietary Exposure to Chemical Pollutants
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3946; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17113946 - 02 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 897
Abstract
There is increasing concern regarding the potential implications of continuous dietary exposure to low doses of artificial chemical pollutants, particularly in critical life stages such as pregnancy and lactation. Within a wider social research, we analyzed the risk perception, discourses, and attitudes of [...] Read more.
There is increasing concern regarding the potential implications of continuous dietary exposure to low doses of artificial chemical pollutants, particularly in critical life stages such as pregnancy and lactation. Within a wider social research, we analyzed the risk perception, discourses, and attitudes of health professionals regarding dietary exposure to artificial chemical contaminants. Data was collected by personal interviews on 35 health professionals from two Spanish regions. Although the participants’ discourses were strongly dominated by the nutritional composition and microbiological contamination, 34 expressed some concern regarding metals, and 23 regarding pesticides. Although only one participant mentioned a plasticizer (i.e., bisphenol A), we noted an underlying concern, since six professionals admitted to recommending pregnant women to somewhat avoid plastic food containers, and were aware of mother-to-child transmission and accumulation of artificial chemicals. The ubiquity of the exposure, the inability to locate the threat, and contradictory messages can all create a sense of helplessness and subsequent cognitive adjustments. Our participants also reported a lack of information, particularly on emerging pollutants. In conclusion, we found a range of valuable discourses that can aid in orienting public health strategies aimed at health professionals who have a substantial influence on their patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Environmental Levels of Bisphenol A on Health)
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Article
Association of Urinary Levels of Bisphenols A, F, and S with Endometriosis Risk: Preliminary Results of the EndEA Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1194; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041194 - 13 Feb 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1290
Abstract
Aim: The aim of this study was to explore associations of urinary concentrations of bisphenols A (BPA), S (BPS), and F (BPF) and of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) with the risk of endometriosis in women of childbearing age. Methods: This case–control [...] Read more.
Aim: The aim of this study was to explore associations of urinary concentrations of bisphenols A (BPA), S (BPS), and F (BPF) and of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) with the risk of endometriosis in women of childbearing age. Methods: This case–control study enrolled 124 women between January 2018 and July 2019: 35 women with endometriosis (cases) and 89 women without endometriosis undergoing abdominal surgery for other reasons (controls). Endometriosis was diagnosed (cases) or ruled out (controls) by laparoscopic inspection of the pelvis and the biopsy of suspected lesions (histological diagnosis). Fasting urine samples were collected before surgery to determine concentrations of BPA, BPS, BPF, and TBARS. Associations of bisphenol and TBARS concentrations with endometriosis risk were explored with multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses. Results: After adjustment for urinary creatinine, age, BMI, parity, and residence, endometriosis risk was increased with each 1 log unit of BPA [OR 1.5; 95%CI 1.0–2.3] and Σbisphenols [OR 1.5; 95%CI 0.9–2.3] but was not associated with the presence of BPS and BPF. Classification of the women by tertiles of exposure revealed statistically significant associations between endometriosis risk and the second tertile of exposure to BPA [OR 3.7; 95%CI 1.3–10.3] and Σbisphenols [OR 5.4; 95%CI 1.9–15.6]. In addition, TBARS concentrations showed a close-to-significant relationship with increased endometriosis risk [OR 1.6; 95%CI 1.0–2.8], and classification by TBARS concentration tertile revealed that the association between endometriosis risk and concentrations of BPA [OR 2.0; 95%CI 1.0–4.1] and Σbisphenols [OR 2.2; 95%CI 1.0–4.6] was only statistically significant for women in the highest TBARS tertile (>4.23 μM). Conclusion: Exposure to bisphenols may increase the risk of endometriosis, and oxidative stress may play a crucial role in this association. Further studies are warranted to verify these findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Environmental Levels of Bisphenol A on Health)
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Review

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Review
Bisphenols and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers—Associations Found in Human Studies, Evaluation of Methods Used, and Strengths and Weaknesses of the Biomarkers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3609; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103609 - 21 May 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1688
Abstract
Bisphenols, particularly bisphenol A (4,4′-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)-diphenol) (BPA), are suspected of inducing oxidative stress in humans, which may be associated with adverse health outcomes. We investigated the associations between exposure to bisphenols and biomarkers of oxidative stress in human studies over the last 12 years [...] Read more.
Bisphenols, particularly bisphenol A (4,4′-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)-diphenol) (BPA), are suspected of inducing oxidative stress in humans, which may be associated with adverse health outcomes. We investigated the associations between exposure to bisphenols and biomarkers of oxidative stress in human studies over the last 12 years (2008‒2019) related to six health endpoints and evaluated their suitability as effect biomarkers. PubMed database searches identified 27 relevant articles that were used for data extraction. In all studies, BPA exposure was reported, whereas some studies also reported other bisphenols. More than a dozen different biomarkers were measured. The most frequently measured biomarkers were 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-isoprostane) and malondialdehyde (MDA), which almost always were positively associated with BPA. Methodological issues were reported for MDA, mainly the need to handle samples with caution to avoid artefact formation and its measurements using a chromatographic step to distinguish it from similar aldehydes, making some of the MDA results less reliable. Urinary 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane can be considered the most reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress associated with BPA exposure. Although none of the biomarkers are considered BPA- or organ-specific, the biomarkers can be assessed repeatedly and non-invasively in urine and could help to understand causal relationships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Environmental Levels of Bisphenol A on Health)
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Review
Once Resin Composites and Dental Sealants Release Bisphenol-A, How Might This Affect Our Clinical Management?—A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1627; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16091627 - 09 May 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1945
Abstract
(1) Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) based dental resins are commonly used in preventive and reparative dentistry. Since some monomers may remain unpolymerized in the application of dental resin, they dissolve in the saliva. (2) Methods: The literature search was carried out in Pubmed, [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) based dental resins are commonly used in preventive and reparative dentistry. Since some monomers may remain unpolymerized in the application of dental resin, they dissolve in the saliva. (2) Methods: The literature search was carried out in Pubmed, Cochrane and Embase databases. Randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and case-control studies that evaluated BPA levels in human urine, saliva and/or blood were included. (3) Results: The initial search had 5111 results. A total of 20 studies were included in the systematic review. Most studies showed an increase of the levels of bisphenol A 1 h after treatments with composite resins and dental sealants. One week after treatments the levels were decreased. (4) Conclusions: Some clinical precautions should be taken to decrease the release of BPA, namely the use of rubber dam, the immediate polishing of all resins used, or the use of glycerin gel to avoid non-polymerization of the last resin layer, and mouthwash after treatment. Another preventive measure in addition to the above-mentioned is the use of the smallest possible number of restorations or sealants, a maximum of four per appointment. These measures are even more important in children, adolescents and pregnant women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Environmental Levels of Bisphenol A on Health)
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