Special Issue "Inflammatory Diseases and Its Impact on Quality of Life"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alejandro Molina-Leyva
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Dermatología, Instituto Biosanitario de Granada, 18012 Granada, Spain
Interests: clinical medicine; epidemiology; dermatology; immune-mediated inflammatory diseases; advanced therapies; quality of life
Prof. Dr. Salvador Arias-Santiago
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: immune-mediated skin diseases; connective tissue diseases; hair diseases; cell-based and tissue engineering skin therapy
Dr. Eduardo Redondo Cerezo
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Head of Gastroenterology Department, Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves, 18014 Granada, Spain
Interests: endoscopic retrograde; cholangiopancreatography; endoscopy EUS; pancreatic diseases; cholangiocarcinoma; gastrointestinal endoscopy
Prof. Dr. Miguel Angel Gonzalez-Gay
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
1. Head of Rheumatology Department, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla de Santander, 39008 Santander, Cantabria, Spain;
2. Department of Medicine, Universidad de Cantabria, 39005 Santander, Cantabria, Spain
Interests: rheumatic diseases; musculoskeletal disorders; rheumatoid arthritis inflammation; autoimmune disease; autoimmunity; psoriasis; cardiovascular; genetics; T lymphocytes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A Special Issue on inflammatory diseases and their impact on quality of life is being organized in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. For detailed information on the journal, I refer you to https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/ijerph.

The term immune-mediated inflammatory diseases covers a wide range of pathologies that can affect different apparatus and systems of the body such as the joints, the intestinal tract or the skin and appendages, among others. They are characterized by a chronic course with possible flare-ups. In recent decades, a revolution has taken place in their treatment with the appearance of biological drugs and other small molecules. In spite of this, in many cases, control of the disease is only partial. In this group of pathologies, evaluating the effectiveness of the treatment through its impact on the quality of life is fundamental. The impact of the disease varies according to personal characteristics and the environment of the individual. Identifying factors related to a better or worse quality of life, the effect of different treatments or evaluating the quality of life in the social environment of patients are issues of great importance. For these reasons, we are promoting this Special Issue focused on quality of life in inflammatory diseases with the aim of deepening, promoting, and strengthening research in this area of knowledge.

New research papers, meta-analysis, reviews, and case reports are welcome to this issue. The keywords listed below provide an outline of some of the possible areas of interest.

Dr. Alejandro Molina-Leyva
Prof. Salvador Arias-Santiago
Dr. Eduardo Redondo Cerezo
Prof. Miguel Angel Gonzalez-Gay
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Immune inflammatory mediated diseases
  • Dermatology
  • Rheumatology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Ophthalmology
  • Quality of life of patients
  • Quality of life of cohabitants
  • Physical health
  • Mental health
  • Sexual health
  • Patient reported outcomes
  • Physical comorbidity
  • Psychological comorbidity
  • Life-changing decisions
  • Therapeutics and quality of life
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Arthritis
  • Spondylitis
  • Psoriasis
  • Hidradenitis suppurativa
  • Alopecia areata
  • Atopic dermatitis
  • Uveitis

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Article
Second-Hand Smoke and Its Synergistic Effect with a Body-Mass Index of >24.9 kg/m2 Increase the Risk of Gout Arthritis in Indonesia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4324; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18084324 - 19 Apr 2021
Viewed by 656
Abstract
To analyze the association between smoking status (active smoking and exposure to Second-Hand Smoking (SHS)) and the synergistic effect of smoking status and BMI with gout risk, a community-based case-control design was undertaken among 385 participants, including 304 healthy controls and 81 gout [...] Read more.
To analyze the association between smoking status (active smoking and exposure to Second-Hand Smoking (SHS)) and the synergistic effect of smoking status and BMI with gout risk, a community-based case-control design was undertaken among 385 participants, including 304 healthy controls and 81 gout patients from seven community health services. Adjusted Odd Ratios (AORs) and 95% Confidence Interval (CIs) of gout for active smoking and SHS were 3.26 (95% CI = 1.07~9.90) and 4.67 (95% CI = 2.18~10.00) compared to non-smokers. Time-dependent manner of active smoking and SHS significantly increased gout risk with AORs and 95% CIs of 5.95 (1.41~25.03) and 10.12 (3.51~29.14). Dose-dependency of active smokers and SHS showed AORs and 95% CIs of 5.15 (1.28~20.63) and 4.37 (1.33~14.28). Smoking 20 cigarettes (one pack) per day for one year is equivalent to one pack-year. Active smoking >20 pack-year and SHS > 26.5 pack-year increased gout risk with AORs and 95% CIs of 7.18 (1.53~33.67) and 9.95 (3.64~27.22). Participants who smoked (active smoking and SHS) and with Body Mass Index (BMI) of > 24.9 kg/m2 synergistically increased gout risk, with an AOR of 9.65 and 95% CI of 3.25~28.65, compared to BMI ≤ 24.9 kg/m2 and non-smoker. Smoking status (active smoking and SHS) and the synergistic effect of smoking status and BMI increased gout risk in Indonesia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Diseases and Its Impact on Quality of Life)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Sexuality in Patients with Hidradenitis Suppurativa: Beliefs, Behaviors and Needs
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8808; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17238808 - 27 Nov 2020
Viewed by 621
Abstract
Little is known about the impact of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) on patients’ sexuality. The aim of this research is to investigate the impact of HS on several previously unexplored aspects of sexuality. In March 2018, we conducted a crowd-sourced cross-sectional online survey hosted [...] Read more.
Little is known about the impact of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) on patients’ sexuality. The aim of this research is to investigate the impact of HS on several previously unexplored aspects of sexuality. In March 2018, we conducted a crowd-sourced cross-sectional online survey hosted by the Spanish association of patients with HS (ASENDHI) and available in Spanish. A panel of experts and patients from ASENDHI designed various questions in order to explore the extent to which HS influenced participants’ sex lives. The final sample consisted of 386 participants, 79.27% (306/386) of which were women and 20.73% (80/306) of which were men. Seventy-seven point one percent (236/306) of women and 67.5% (54/80) of men were in stable relationships; the rest of the participants were single. Forty-seven point nine percent (185/386) admitted to feeling fear of rejection. Pain was the symptom that most interfered with sexual relations in women and suppuration in men. Forty-four point three percent (171/386) of the participants considered themselves to be less attractive than average. Considering the participants in a stable relationship, women described receiving more emotional support from their partners, while men received more help with lesion dressing in intimate areas. Seventy-one point four percent (207/290) of participants stated that HS negatively affected their relationship. Among single patients, women experienced greater fear of rejection and were less willing to meet new people because of HS. Ninety-four point three percent (66/70) of women and 80.8% (21/26) of men stated that HS had a negative influence on their chances of having a relationship or sexual relations. In conclusion, HS has a significant, unrecognized and misunderstood impact on sexuality which must be addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Diseases and Its Impact on Quality of Life)
Article
Quality of Life in Cohabitants of Patients with Hidradenitis Suppurativa: A Cross-sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 6000; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17166000 - 18 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 871
Abstract
Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that impairs patients’ physical and mental health. However, few studies have considered the consequences of HS on cohabitants. The aims of this study were to explore the impact of HS on the quality of life [...] Read more.
Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that impairs patients’ physical and mental health. However, few studies have considered the consequences of HS on cohabitants. The aims of this study were to explore the impact of HS on the quality of life (QOL) of cohabitants and to assess potentially associated factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted and patients with HS and their cohabitants were invited to participate. Validated questionnaires were used to measure QOL, anxiety and depression, type D personality and sexual dysfunction. The clinical variables of patients and the demographic characteristics of cohabitants were also collected. Twenty-seven patients and 27 cohabitants were included for analysis. Patients and cohabitants presented significant QOL impairment. A direct association was found between the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the Familiar Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI). DLQI scores were associated with the presence of negative affectivity, a trait typical of type D personality, as well as with cohabitants’ anxiety. FDLQI scores were associated with cohabitant anxiety and patient depression. Hidradenitis suppurativa damages quality of life in patients and cohabitants. Identifying potential psychological factors could help us to recognize at-risk patients and apply personalized treatments for them and their environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Diseases and Its Impact on Quality of Life)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Misperception of the Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5954; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17165954 - 17 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 811
Abstract
The risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease and mortality is increased by rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, data on how RA patients perceive their own CV risk and their adherence to CV prevention factors are scarce. We conducted an observational study on 266 patients with [...] Read more.
The risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease and mortality is increased by rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, data on how RA patients perceive their own CV risk and their adherence to CV prevention factors are scarce. We conducted an observational study on 266 patients with RA to determine whether the perceived CV risk correlates to the objective CV risk, and if it influences their compliance with a Mediterranean diet and physical exercise. The objective CV risk was calculated according to the modified European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). The perceived CV risk did not correlate to the objective CV risk. The correlation was even lower when carotid ultrasound was used. Notably, 64.62% of patients miscalculated their CV risk, with 43.08% underestimating it. Classic CV risk factors, carotid ultrasound markers and ESR and CRP showed significant correlation with the objective CV risk. However, only hypertension and RA disease features showed association with the perceived CV risk. Neither the objective CV risk nor the perceived CV risk were associated with the accomplishment of a Mediterranean diet or physical activity. In conclusion, RA patients tend to underestimate their actual CV risk, giving more importance to RA features than to classic CV risk factors. They are not concerned enough about the beneficial effects of physical activity or diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Diseases and Its Impact on Quality of Life)

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Review
Role of Quality of Life as Endpoint for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Treatment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7159; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137159 - 04 Jul 2021
Viewed by 541
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic disabling conditions, characterized by an unpredictable course with flare-ups and periods of remission, that frequently affect young people and require lifelong medical follow-up and treatment. For years, the main endpoints of IBD treatment had been clinical remission [...] Read more.
Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic disabling conditions, characterized by an unpredictable course with flare-ups and periods of remission, that frequently affect young people and require lifelong medical follow-up and treatment. For years, the main endpoints of IBD treatment had been clinical remission and response, followed by biomarker normalization and mucosal healing. In the last decades, different therapies have been proved to be effective to treat IBD and the use of patient reported outcome (PRO) have become more relevant. Therefore, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) that has been defined as the value assigned to the duration of life influenced by physical and mental health, has been suggested as an important endpoint for IBD management since multiple studies have shown that IBD impairs it, both physically and psychologically. Thus, HRQoL has been included as an outcome in numerous studies evaluating different IBD therapies, both clinical trials and real-life studies. It has been assessed by using both generic and specific disease tools, and most treatments used in clinical practice have been demonstrated to improve HRQoL. The relevance of HRQoL as an endpoint for new drugs is going to increase and its management and improvement will also improve the prognosis of IBD patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Diseases and Its Impact on Quality of Life)
Review
Quality of Life in Hidradenitis Suppurativa: An Update
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 6131; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18116131 - 06 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 687
Abstract
Knowledge on hidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa (HS) is rapidly increasing. HS has a profound impact on patients and their family life. Several factors, such as comorbidities, unemployment and HS severity, make this impact even more severe. The most widely used instrument to measure this [...] Read more.
Knowledge on hidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa (HS) is rapidly increasing. HS has a profound impact on patients and their family life. Several factors, such as comorbidities, unemployment and HS severity, make this impact even more severe. The most widely used instrument to measure this impact is the dermatology-specific DLQI. We also identified six HS-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments. Of them, HIDRAdisk, HSIA, HiSQOL and HSQoL-24 are better validated but there is still lack of experience of its use. Several treatment methods showed positive effect on patients’ HRQoL. Surgery remains a method with a substantial positive effect on HRQoL. Several studies confirming a positive effect of adalimumab on the HRQoL of patients with HS were published during the last three years. Data on the influence of several other biologics on HRQoL of HS patients are controversial or based on studies with a small number of patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Diseases and Its Impact on Quality of Life)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Systematic Review
The Burden of Hidradenitis Suppurativa Signs and Symptoms in Quality of Life: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6709; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136709 - 22 Jun 2021
Viewed by 601
Abstract
Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, recurrent and debilitating inflammatory skin disease of the hair follicle that usually presents as painful, deep-seated inflamed lesions in the apocrine gland-bearing areas of the body. HS patients suffer from uncomfortable signs and symptoms, such as pain, [...] Read more.
Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, recurrent and debilitating inflammatory skin disease of the hair follicle that usually presents as painful, deep-seated inflamed lesions in the apocrine gland-bearing areas of the body. HS patients suffer from uncomfortable signs and symptoms, such as pain, pruritus, malodour and suppuration, which may impair patients’ quality of life (QoL). Although HS patients frequently experience these signs and symptoms, they are only occasionally assessed by clinicians and, unexpectedly, the scientific evidence available is limited and heterogeneous. The aim of this study is to summarize the evidence regarding the impact of HS signs and symptoms on QoL to serve as a basis for future research and help clinicians to consider them in the daily care of HS patients. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted following PRISMA Guidelines. The following search algorithm was used: (hidradenitis or “acne inversa”) and (pain or itch or odour or malodour or suppuration or oozing or drainage) and (“quality of life”). The literature search identified 836 references, 17 of them met the eligible criteria and were included for analysis, representing 4929 HS patients. Mean age of the participants was 36.28 years and there was a predominance of female sex among study participants. The BMI of the population was in the range of over-weight and about two out five patients were active smokers. Studies included patients with mild to moderate HS, with a mean disease duration of 13.69 years. The HS signs and symptoms assessed were pain, pruritus, malodour and suppuration. Overall, the higher intensity of a sign or symptom correlated with poorer general QoL or specific QoL dimensions including sexual distress, anxiety, depression and sleep. The most frequently employed tool to assess QoL was the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). DLQI was used in 52.9% of the studies (9/17) with a mean value of 10.70 (2.16 SD). The scores employed to assess signs and symptoms severity were subjective and varied between studies, being the numerical rating scale (NRS) for each of the most used symptoms. The mean NRS value for pain was 3.99 and the mean NRS for pruritus was 4.99. In conclusion, we have summarized, categorized and analyzed the scientific evidence regarding signs and symptoms in HS patients and their impairment in QoL. Their assessment should be thorough and included during routine evaluation of HS patients to motivate therapeutic modifications and increase patients’ health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Diseases and Its Impact on Quality of Life)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Case Report
Cognitive Impairment in Inpatients with Prurigo Nodularis and Psychiatric Comorbidities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6265; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126265 - 09 Jun 2021
Viewed by 570
Abstract
Background: Prurigo nodularis (PN) is a chronic refractory itchy dermatosis. Although psychiatric comorbidity is known, research in cognitive impairment is lacking. We evaluated the occurrence and types of cognitive impairment in a series of inpatients with PN. Methods: This was a retrospective chart [...] Read more.
Background: Prurigo nodularis (PN) is a chronic refractory itchy dermatosis. Although psychiatric comorbidity is known, research in cognitive impairment is lacking. We evaluated the occurrence and types of cognitive impairment in a series of inpatients with PN. Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of all the patients with PN admitted to a referral neurological institute from September 2018 to March 2021. Any neurological and psychiatric disorder, along with neuroactive drugs taken, were concomitantly assessed. Results: A total of 16 patients with PN (median age: 70 years, two males) were selected from a total of 1806 hospital admissions. Most of them had a neurodegenerative cognitive disorder, from mild cognitive impairment (8) to Alzheimer’s disease (1), followed by mixed disorder (degenerative and vascular) in six and vascular dementia in one. Comorbid psychiatric diseases (anxiety and depression) were more common than either individual condition, followed by bipolar disorder, whereas two patients did not show psychiatric manifestations. Most patients were on combined treatment with benzodiazepines and antidepressants. Conclusion: Cognitive impairment can be observed in PN. In addition to screening for psychiatric comorbidity and initiating appropriate treatment or referral, clinicians may also consider the presence of cognitive impairment in PN of both degenerative and vascular origin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Diseases and Its Impact on Quality of Life)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop