Special Issue "Innovation in Physical Activity Assessment"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Richard R. Suminski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Behavioral Health & Nutrition, University of Delaware, 021 Carpenter Sports Bldg, Newark, DE 19711, USA
Interests: physical activity; human behavior; measurement; direct observation; video technology; social and physical determinants of physical activity
Dr. Gregory M. Dominick
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Behavioral Health & Nutrition, University of Delaware, 012 Carpenter Sports Bldg, Newark, DE 19711, USA
Interests: physical activity; human behavior; measurement; wearable and video technology; machine learning; social and physical determinants of physical activity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Both physical and mental maladies associated with low levels of physical activity continue to plague people of all ages living throughout the world. In the U.S.A., for instance, only 23% of adults achieve the recommended amounts of physical activity in a given week. Thus, effective physical activity promotion strategies need to be developed, tested and implemented; however, for this to happen, feasible, reliable, and valid physical activity assessment methods must be available. Of particular interest are assessment methodologies for evaluating group or population-level physical activity within free-living settings such as parks, neighborhoods, public open spaces, etc. Further, it is critical a multi-disciplinary approach is taken to ensure the latest and most innovative technologies are incorporated into the assessment paradigm. Data capture procedures and devices (e.g., video cameras, sensors), data processing and analysis systems (e.g., computer vision, artificial intelligence), and data access/display formats (e.g., dashboards) are just some areas starting to arise in the physical activity assessment literature.  For the current Special Issue, we are seeking high quality, scientific papers addressing topics related to the areas mentioned, especially those combining rigorous and reproducible scholarship with practical relevance for the study and promotion of physical activity behavior.

Dr. Richard R. Suminski
Dr. Gregory M. Dominick
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • assessment
  • innovation
  • technology
  • methods
  • human behavior

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Repurposing an EMG Biofeedback Device for Gait Rehabilitation: Development, Validity and Reliability
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6460; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126460 - 15 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1164
Abstract
Gait impairment often limits physical activity and negatively impacts quality of life. EMG-Biofeedback (EMG-BFB), one of the more effective interventions for improving gait impairment, has been limited to laboratory use due to system costs and technical requirements, and has therefore not been tested [...] Read more.
Gait impairment often limits physical activity and negatively impacts quality of life. EMG-Biofeedback (EMG-BFB), one of the more effective interventions for improving gait impairment, has been limited to laboratory use due to system costs and technical requirements, and has therefore not been tested on a larger scale. In our research, we aimed to develop and validate a cost-effective, commercially available EMG-BFB device for home- and community-based use. We began by repurposing mTrigger® (mTrigger LLC, Newark, DE, USA), a cost-effective, portable EMG-BFB device, for gait application. This included developing features in the cellphone app such as step feedback, success rate, muscle activity calibration, and cloud integration. Next, we tested the validity and reliability of the mTrigger device in healthy adults by comparing it to a laboratory-grade EMG system. While wearing both devices, 32 adults walked overground and on a treadmill at four speeds (0.3, 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 m/s). Statistical analysis revealed good to excellent test–retest reliability (r > 0.89) and good to excellent agreement in the detection of steps (ICC > 0.85) at all speeds between two systems for treadmill walking. Our results indicated that mTrigger compared favorably to a laboratory-grade EMG system in the ability to assess muscular activity and to provide biofeedback during walking in healthy adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Physical Activity Assessment)
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