Special Issue "Treatment of Insomnia and Sleep Disorders"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Kneginja Richter
E-Mail Website
Chief Guest Editor
Department for Sleep Medicine, Chronobiology and Neurostimulation, University Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg 90402, Germany
Interests: sleep medicine; chronobiology; insomnia; shiftwork; neurostimulation; CBT-I; sleep health promotion; circadian rhythm
Prof. Dr. Antje Büttner-Teleagă
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
1. Institute of Cognitive Science, Woosuk University, 443 Samnye-ro, Samnye-eup, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do, South Korea
2. Department of Psychiatry, University Witten-Herdecke, 58455 Witten, Germany
Interests: sleep medicine; sleep breathing disorders; insomnia; shiftwork; CBT-I; sleep health promotion; circadian rhythm; CBT-PTS; CBT-D; CBT-A; neuro-cognitive functions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sleep medicine is a fast-growing area of medical practice that involves multiple medical and health professions. This Special Issue is dedicated to emerging digital and virtual methods for diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders. Many of these new approaches are suitable for use in telemedicine. This Special Issue calls for papers: 1) reporting on the effectiveness, and implementation of wearables in the diagnosis of sleep disorders, 2) contrasting the utility of diverse physiological and kinematic signals for detecting sleep disorders, 3) reporting on the usage of telemedicine methods in the treatment of sleep apnea, insomnia and other sleep disorders, and 4) evaluating diagnostic and therapeutic effectiveness and efficacy of apps and online therapies for sleep disorders.


Prof. Dr. Kneginja Richter
Prof. Dr. Antje Büttner-Teleagă
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • digital sleep medicine
  • virtual sleep medicine
  • telemedicine
  • online sleep therapy
  • wearables in sleep medicine

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
The Mediator Role of Routines on the Relationship between General Procrastination, Academic Procrastination and Perceived Importance of Sleep and Bedtime Procrastination
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7796; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157796 - 22 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Background: Sleep plays a key role in our overall function, and sleep insufficiency has been highlighted as a major health issue. ‘Bedtime procrastination’—i.e., needlessly delaying the time one goes to bed without external reasons—is one reason for sleep insufficiency. The present research aims [...] Read more.
Background: Sleep plays a key role in our overall function, and sleep insufficiency has been highlighted as a major health issue. ‘Bedtime procrastination’—i.e., needlessly delaying the time one goes to bed without external reasons—is one reason for sleep insufficiency. The present research aims to explore the interrelationships among Bedtime Procrastination, other domains of Procrastination, and routine-related variables. Methods: The mediating effects of Wake-up Time and Dinner Time on the relationship between Bedtime Procrastination and General Procrastination, Academic Procrastination, and Perceived Importance of Sleep were tested. Self-reported questionnaires were used, and the sample comprised of 446 university students. Results: A partial mediation model was found. General Procrastination, Academic Procrastination, and Perceived Importance of Sleep showed direct effects on Bedtime Procrastination. Moreover, Academic and General Procrastination were positively associated with Bedtime Procrastination, whereas Perceived Importance of Sleep was negatively associated with Bedtime Procrastination. Indirect effects of the Perceived Importance of Sleep and General Procrastination, as mediated by Wake-up Time and Dinner Time, on Bedtime Procrastination were also found. Conclusions: Personal routines (Wake-up Time and Dinner Time) along with individual characteristics (General and Academic Procrastination) and beliefs (perceived importance of sleep) may affect Bedtime Procrastination. Present results highlight the complexity of Bedtime Procrastination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment of Insomnia and Sleep Disorders)
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Article
Accuracy of a Smartphone Application Measuring Snoring in Adults—How Smart Is It Actually?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7326; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147326 - 08 Jul 2021
Viewed by 488
Abstract
About 40% of the adult population is affected by snoring, which is closely related to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and can be associated with serious health implications. Commercial smartphone applications (apps) offer the possibility of monitoring snoring at home. However, the number of [...] Read more.
About 40% of the adult population is affected by snoring, which is closely related to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and can be associated with serious health implications. Commercial smartphone applications (apps) offer the possibility of monitoring snoring at home. However, the number of validation studies addressing snoring apps is limited. The purpose of the present study was to assess the accuracy of recorded snoring using the free version of the app SnoreLab (Reviva Softworks Ltd., London, UK) in comparison to a full-night polygraphic measurement (Miniscreen plus, Löwenstein Medical GmbH & Co., KG, Bad Ems, Germany). Nineteen healthy adult volunteers (4 female, 15 male, mean age: 38.9 ± 19.4 years) underwent simultaneous polygraphic and SnoreLab app measurement for one night at home. Parameters obtained by the SnoreLab app were: starting/ending time of monitoring, time in bed, duration and percent of quiet sleep, light, loud and epic snoring, total snoring time and Snore Score, a specific score obtained by the SnoreLab app. Data obtained from polygraphy were: starting/ending time of monitoring, time in bed, total snoring time, snore index (SI), snore index obstructive (SI obstructive) and apnea-hypopnea-index (AHI). For different thresholds of percentage snoring per night, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Comparison of methods was undertaken by Spearman-Rho correlations and Bland-Altman plots. The SnoreLab app provides acceptable accuracy values measuring snoring >50% per night: 94.7% accuracy, 100% sensitivity, 94.1% specificity, 66.6% positive prediction value and 100% negative prediction value. Best agreement between both methods was achieved in comparing the sum of loud and epic snoring ratios obtained by the SnoreLab app with the total snoring ratio measured by polygraphy. Obstructive events could not be detected by the SnoreLab app. Compared to polygraphy, the SnoreLab app provides acceptable accuracy values regarding the measurement of especially heavy snoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment of Insomnia and Sleep Disorders)
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Article
Insomnia Associated with Tinnitus and Gender Differences
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3209; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18063209 - 19 Mar 2021
Viewed by 776
Abstract
Chronic tinnitus causes a decrease in well-being and can negatively affect sleep quality. It has further been indicated that there are clinically relevant gender differences, which may also have an impact on sleep quality. By conducting a retrospective and explorative data analysis for [...] Read more.
Chronic tinnitus causes a decrease in well-being and can negatively affect sleep quality. It has further been indicated that there are clinically relevant gender differences, which may also have an impact on sleep quality. By conducting a retrospective and explorative data analysis for differences in patients with tinnitus and patients diagnosed with tinnitus and insomnia, hypothesized differences were explored in the summed test scores and on item-level of the validated psychometric instruments. A cross-sectional study was conducted collecting data from a sample of tinnitus patients (n = 76). Insomnia was diagnosed in 49 patients. Gender differences were found on aggregated test scores of the MADRS and BDI with men scoring higher than women, indicating higher depressive symptoms in men. Women stated to suffer more from headaches (p < 0.003), neck pain (p < 0.006) and nervousness as well as restlessness (p < 0.02). Women also reported an increase in tinnitus loudness in response to stress compared to men (p < 0.03). Male individuals with tinnitus and insomnia have higher depression scores and more clinically relevant depressive symptoms than women, who suffer more from psychosomatic symptoms. The results indicate a need for a targeted therapy of depressive symptoms in male patients and targeted treatment of psychosomatic symptoms, stress-related worsening of insomnia and tinnitus in women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment of Insomnia and Sleep Disorders)
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Article
Analyses of Weight/Blood Pressure Changes before and after Tonsillectomy in Adults: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1948; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041948 - 17 Feb 2021
Viewed by 657
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the changes in weight and blood pressure in Korean adults who underwent tonsillectomy compared to controls. A nested case-control study used data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service-Health Screening Cohort (2002–2015). Tonsillectomy was defined using claim code [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the changes in weight and blood pressure in Korean adults who underwent tonsillectomy compared to controls. A nested case-control study used data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service-Health Screening Cohort (2002–2015). Tonsillectomy was defined using claim code Q2300. The changes in weight and systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) were measured before tonsillectomy and 1 year after tonsillectomy (study I) in some participants and during the second year after tonsillectomy (study II) in other participants. Patients who underwent tonsillectomy (n = 569 in study I; n = 556 in study II) were 1:4 matched with control participants (n = 2276 in study I; n = 2224 in study II). The paired t-test and linear mixed model were used to test the differences between groups at each time point. There were no changes in body mass index (p = 0.732 in study I; p = 0.128 in study II), SBP (p = 0.344 in study I; p = 0.559 in study II), or DBP (p = 0.826 in study I; p = 0.524 in study II) between the tonsillectomy patients and controls in the first or second year postoperatively. Subgroup analyses by age, sex, and degree of obesity showed consistent results. Tonsillectomy does not lead to a change in weight or blood pressure in Korean adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment of Insomnia and Sleep Disorders)
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