Special Issue "The Lifestyle Medicine Movement: An Extention of Public Health into Medicine"

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Leigh A. Frame
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC, USA
Interests: nutrition; microbiome; obesity; public health; integrative medicine; Vitamin D; bariatric surgery; immunology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lifestyle is linked to the leading causes of death globally, including overconsumption of alcohol, use of tobacco, sedentary behavior, and poor dietary choices. Despite the growing recognition of the importance of lifestyle factors in the prevention of disease and promotion of health and wellness (including their inclusion into practice guidelines), many patients have not been receiving counselling on this topic, sparking the Lifestyle Medicine movement.

This Special Issue will utilize the following definition of Lifestyle Medicine based on those of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and the American College of Preventative Medicine:

The whole person approach to medicine, health, and wellness using evidence-based behavioural interventions to promote dietary patterns emphasizing whole foods and plants, being physically active, sufficient and restorative sleep, stress management, positive social support, and environmental exposure management.

This Special Issue offers an opportunity to publish high-quality multidisciplinary research and reviews that focus on the impact of the Lifestyle Medicine movement. Investigators who have conducted research on these topics are invited to submit manuscripts for consideration for this Special Issue in IJERPH.

Dr. Leigh A. Frame
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lifestyle medicine
  • health
  • wellness
  • prevention
  • nutrition
  • physical activity
  • behavior change
  • environment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Associations between Suboptimal Sleep and Smoking, Poor Nutrition, Harmful Alcohol Consumption and Inadequate Physical Activity (‘SNAP Risks’): A Comparison of People with and without a Mental Health Condition in an Australian Community Survey
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5946; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115946 - 01 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Introduction: People with a mental health condition experience disproportionate morbidity and mortality compared to the general population. This inequity has been largely attributed to a higher prevalence of chronic disease risk behaviours including smoking, poor nutrition, harmful alcohol consumption and inadequate physical activity [...] Read more.
Introduction: People with a mental health condition experience disproportionate morbidity and mortality compared to the general population. This inequity has been largely attributed to a higher prevalence of chronic disease risk behaviours including smoking, poor nutrition, harmful alcohol consumption and inadequate physical activity (‘SNAP risks’). Suboptimal sleep is highly prevalent among people with a mental health condition and, as an identified risk behaviour for several chronic diseases, has been implicated as an additional contributor to this health inequity. Research involving people without a mental health condition suggests associations between poor sleep and each SNAP risk; however, interactions with mental health status have not been reported in an Australian population. This study explored associations between suboptimal sleep and all four SNAP risks, and assessed whether they vary by mental health status. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study (n = 1265) was undertaken using self-report data from a cross-sectional telephone survey of Australian adults. Based on national guidelines and recommendations that indicate when someone might be at risk of adverse health effects, SNAP risks and sleep variables were reduced to two levels: ‘at risk’ or ‘not at risk’; and ‘appropriate’ or ‘suboptimal’, respectively. Chi square tests and multivariable logistic regression models explored associations between suboptimal sleep, SNAP risks and mental health status. Results: Fifteen per cent (n = 184) of participants identified as having a mental health condition in the past 12 months. Being at risk of adverse health effects due to smoking had the strongest association with several measures of suboptimal sleep (ps < 0.05). Two-way interactions revealed that being at risk of adverse health effects due to alcohol use and physical inactivity resulted in a significantly greater likelihood of suboptimal sleep duration (OR 3.06, 95% CI 1.41 to 6.64; OR 3.06, 95% CI 1.41 to 6.69) and nap duration (OR 7.96, 95% CI 1.90 to 33.22), respectively, for people with a mental health condition compared to those without. Conclusions: The findings suggest associations between suboptimal sleep and smoking, risky alcohol consumption and physical inactivity, with the latter two perhaps being stronger among people with a mental health condition compared to those without such a condition. Poor sleep should be considered in interventions to address smoking, alcohol and physical activity; and vice versa. This study lends further support for the value of multirisk lifestyle interventions to promote physical and mental health for people with mental health conditions. Full article
Article
Identification of Important Factors Affecting Use of Digital Individualised Coaching and Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes in General Practice: A Qualitative Feasibility Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3924; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18083924 - 08 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 765
Abstract
Most type 2 diabetes patients are treated in general practice and there is a need of developing and implementing efficient lifestyle interventions. eHealth interventions have shown to be effective in promoting a healthy lifestyle. The purpose of this study was to test the [...] Read more.
Most type 2 diabetes patients are treated in general practice and there is a need of developing and implementing efficient lifestyle interventions. eHealth interventions have shown to be effective in promoting a healthy lifestyle. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility, including the identification of factors of importance, when offering digital lifestyle coaching to type 2 diabetes patients in general practice. We conducted a qualitative feasibility study with focus group interviews in four general practices. We identified two overall themes and four subthemes: (1) the distribution of roles and lifestyle interventions in general practice (subthemes: external and internal distribution of roles) and (2) the pros and cons for digital lifestyle interventions in general practice (subthemes: access to real life data and change in daily routines). We conclude that for digital lifestyle coaching to be feasible in a general practice setting, it was of great importance that the general practitioners and practice nurses knew the role and content of the intervention. In general, there was a positive attitude in the general practice setting towards referring type 2 diabetes patients to digital lifestyle intervention if it was easy to refer the patients and if easily understandable and accessible feedback was implemented into the electronic health record. It was important that the digital lifestyle intervention was flexible and offered healthcare providers in general practice an opportunity to follow the type 2 diabetes patient closely. Full article
Article
Connections between Family Assets and Positive Youth Development: The Association between Parental Monitoring and Affection with Leisure-Time Activities and Substance Use
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8170; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218170 - 05 Nov 2020
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Abstract
This study aimed to determine the associations between parental monitoring and affection and three adolescent lifestyle aspects: constructive leisure, non-constructive leisure and substance use. A cross-sectional study was conducted in four countries (Chile, Mexico, Spain and Peru). Adolescents aged 12–15 self-completed a multi-purpose [...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine the associations between parental monitoring and affection and three adolescent lifestyle aspects: constructive leisure, non-constructive leisure and substance use. A cross-sectional study was conducted in four countries (Chile, Mexico, Spain and Peru). Adolescents aged 12–15 self-completed a multi-purpose questionnaire. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to analyse the association between the parental monitoring and affection variables and the outcomes in terms of the children’s lifestyles. The results indicate that parental monitoring is conducive to more constructive leisure and less non-constructive leisure and seems to be conducive to the prevention of substance use. Furthermore, parental affection is conducive to constructive leisure and the prevention of substance use. The discussion focuses on the fact that the family can be a protective resource associated with positive adolescent development. Full article
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Opinion
Nutrition, a Tenet of Lifestyle Medicine but Not Medicine?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5974; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115974 - 02 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Nutrition is a foundation of health and one of six pillars of Lifestyle Medicine. The importance of nutrition in clinical care is now widely recognized by health care professionals and the public. However, clinicians are not comfortable counselling their patients on nutrition due [...] Read more.
Nutrition is a foundation of health and one of six pillars of Lifestyle Medicine. The importance of nutrition in clinical care is now widely recognized by health care professionals and the public. However, clinicians are not comfortable counselling their patients on nutrition due to inadequate or lack of training, leaving a significant need in patient care. This gap can be closed with evidence-based curricula in medical schools and in the trainings of other health care professionals. This communication presents the current state of nutrition knowledge in health care, emphasizing nutrition education for physicians, and presents a model of how pre- through post-professional health care providers may become proficient in nutrition counseling including appropriate referral to more specialized providers. With these skills, health care professionals will be able to initiate patient-centered lifestyle plans. This includes improving diet and utilization of team-based medicine and referrals. Full article
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