Special Issue "Maternal Children Health and Family Planning"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Women's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Joseph Telfair
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460, USA
Interests: maternal and child health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite the rapid development of medical and public health practice and interventions, maternal and child health (MCH) remains a public health challenge of global concern. Various factors causing of maternal, infant and child morbidity and mortality may combine, resulting in poor maternal health and birth outcomes. Health conditions unique to women, the impact of traumas on pregnancy outcomes and genetic expression, and preconception and interconception health underscore social, structural and systemic inequities in approaches to care for vulnerable populations. Improving the health of mothers, infants and children remains an important public health priority.

It is recognized that efforts toward this end must identify the links between the social determinants of health and maternal, child and family health outcomes. One such identified link that has universally proven to be an impactful factor whose management can improve MCH outcomes is targeted family planning. Family planning as an intervention strategy is cost-effective in the short and long term. As a policy for practice, it focuses on women’s empowerment and works to reduce the causes of poor social and health outcomes and the challenges experienced by children and families, including poverty. Evidence from many studies makes clear that effective family planning has helped women and men to exercise their rights in making voluntary and informed decisions on the spacing of childbirth and the number of children they would like to have, as well as on sexual reproductive health and on key issues for women regarding birth, prenatal and postpartum care, prevention of the leading causes of maternal mortality and contemporary strategies to improve related outcomes. Furthermore, family planning has proven helpful in reducing health risks for mothers and children and the burden of life difficulties in at-risk populations in middle- and low-income countries.

This Special Issue seeks to collect and publish evidence-based research studies on family planning and maternal and child health that will:

  • Examine the relative health experiences and MCH outcomes in populations subject to social, economic, geographic, and health or healthcare disparities
  • Evaluate risk factors and etiologies related to observed social, economic, geographic and health inequalities/disparities and provide an understanding of the factors that imped family planning and maternal and child health best practices.
  • Study new or existing interventions, particularly for at-risk groups, designed to improve social, economic, policy, geographic and health outcomes in at-risk populations.

Rigorous quantitative and qualitative empirical studies, policy studies and high-quality systematic reviews will be considered.

Prof. Dr. Joseph Telfair
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
5-Methyltetrahydrofolate and Vitamin B12 Supplementation Is Associated with Clinical Pregnancy and Live Birth in Women Undergoing Assisted Reproductive Technology
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(23), 12280; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182312280 - 23 Nov 2021
Viewed by 249
Abstract
The homocysteine pathway in the preconception period should be evaluated to highlight micronutrient deficiencies and warrants optimal multivitamin supplementation, before Assisted Reproduction, as preconception care. We conducted a retrospective study aimed at investigating the role of vitamin B complex (5-methyltetrahydrofolate, vitamin B12, vitamin [...] Read more.
The homocysteine pathway in the preconception period should be evaluated to highlight micronutrient deficiencies and warrants optimal multivitamin supplementation, before Assisted Reproduction, as preconception care. We conducted a retrospective study aimed at investigating the role of vitamin B complex (5-methyltetrahydrofolate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6) supplement use compared with the role of only folic acid supplement use, in relation to clinical pregnancy and live birth in infertile women undergoing homologous ART. We investigated 269 Caucasian women referred to the Centre for Assisted Reproductive Technology for homologous ART. In these women, 111 (Group A) were daily supplemented with vitamin B complex and 158 (Group B) with only folic acid. In group A the mean number of Metaphase II oocytes and the 2PN Fertilization Rate were higher in comparison to group A (p = 0.04; p = 0.05, respectively). A higher percentage of women in group A had a clinical pregnancy and live birth in comparison to group B (p = 0.01; p = 0.02, respectively). Vitamin B complex supplementation remained independently associated, after multivariable adjustment, with clinical pregnancy (OR 2.03, p = 0.008) and live birth (OR 1.83, p = 0.03). Women supplemented with 5-MTHF and vitamin B12, have a higher chance of clinical pregnancy and live birth in comparison to those supplemented with only folic acid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal Children Health and Family Planning)
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Article
Obstetrical Soft Tissue Trauma during Spontaneous Vaginal Birth in the Romanian Adolescent Population—Multicentric Comparative Study with Adult Population
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11491; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182111491 - 31 Oct 2021
Viewed by 501
Abstract
Romania is a country with high rates of adolescent births, associating scarce comprehensive obstetrical management with this specific population. This research aims to assess soft tissue trauma after vaginal birth in teenage mothers compared to their adult counterparts. A retrospective case-control study was [...] Read more.
Romania is a country with high rates of adolescent births, associating scarce comprehensive obstetrical management with this specific population. This research aims to assess soft tissue trauma after vaginal birth in teenage mothers compared to their adult counterparts. A retrospective case-control study was conducted for one year in two hospitals. All vaginal deliveries were considered; the age cut-off value was considered at 20 years old for case and control groups. Lacerations were divided into three subgroups, considering the involved anatomical region; group I: labial and periurethral lacerations, group II: vaginal and perineal lacerations, and group III: cervical lacerations. There were 1498 women included in the study: 298 young mothers and 1200 adults. Teenagers were more likely to have an episiotomy during vaginal delivery compared to adult women: 56% versus 26.7% (p = 0.00, Pearson Chi-square) and a 1.89 times increased risk for developing additional group II lacerations: p = 0.01, Pearson Chi-square test with Bonferroni correction: OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.18–3.02. Group II lacerations were the most frequent type of birth trauma in both study groups. Fetal weight ≥4000 g was associated with a two times higher risk for vaginal and perineal lacerations when age criterion was not considered (OR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.13–3.47, p = 0.01). The incidence of group I and II lacerations increased with age: from 0% and 9.1% between 10 and 14 years old to 6% and 26.2% between 18 and 19 years old. All groups of lacerations were more often identified in the case group, compared to the adult group. Fetal macrosomia and spontaneously ruptured membranes at admission could not be documented as risk factors for obstetrical injury in young mothers. Episiotomy performed in teenagers was not a protective procedure for group II lacerations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal Children Health and Family Planning)
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