Special Issue "Maternal Delivery Nursing and Female Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Women's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stefania Triunfo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Università Degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy
Interests: obstetrics; high risk pregnancy; nutrition; prevention; maternal and fetal medicine
Dr. Enrico Iurlaro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Università Degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy.
Interests: obstetrics; high risk pregnancy; delivery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last half of the 20th century, advances in feto-maternal medicine made birth safer for high-risk women and for those with pre-existing medical conditions. Current efforts for creating woman-centered care by engaging all health professionals represent an innovative approach in modern maternity care units.  

In this Special Issue, our interest is focused on the contribution of nurses working with childbearing families. To date, they are involved in a significant variety of new challenges for obstetrics, including maternal well-being and satisfaction, shortened lengths of hospital stay, a greater use of community-based and home care, and downsizing and mergers of health-care systems.

Both original research works and reviews with the aim of emphasizing the central role played by maternity nurses working with today’s childbearing families are welcome. Investigations exploring the global perspective of labor and delivery nurses in handling a delicate new life, new family member, and entirely new experience, and prioritizing the health and safety of the mother–child dyad are welcome.

Dr. Stefania Triunfo
Dr. Enrico Iurlaro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nurse
  • Labor
  • Delivery
  • Health
  • Care
  • Woman-centered care

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Dietary Intake Quality Is Affected by Knowledge and Dietary Intake Frequency among Pregnant Women in Muntinlupa, Philippines: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(23), 12306; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182312306 (registering DOI) - 23 Nov 2021
Viewed by 307
Abstract
Improving the nutrition of pregnant women is essential in reducing maternal and child mortality, which is one of the global nutritional goals of 2025. This study evaluated the factors related to the quality of dietary intake among pregnant women in Muntinlupa, Philippines. We [...] Read more.
Improving the nutrition of pregnant women is essential in reducing maternal and child mortality, which is one of the global nutritional goals of 2025. This study evaluated the factors related to the quality of dietary intake among pregnant women in Muntinlupa, Philippines. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 280 pregnant women at a hospital in Muntinlupa from March 2019 to August 2019 using questionnaires. After the primary aggregation, multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with the quality of dietary intake in pregnant women. Approximately half of the women (46.4%, n = 130) had a low dietary diversity during pregnancy. Less than 30% of the respondents consumed beans, soybean products, and nuts. In the logistic regression analysis, poor maternal knowledge of nutritional sources to prevent anemia (odds ratio (OR) 4.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.47–12.32, p = 0.01) and less frequent meal consumption (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.08–4.29, p = 0.03) were significantly associated with poor dietary diversity. Our findings are crucial because they suggest that increasing the knowledge of pregnant women about good nutrition and ensuring that dietary intake is frequent and adequate through antenatal care can improve the nutrition of pregnant women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal Delivery Nursing and Female Health)
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Article
The Association between Birth Satisfaction and the Risk of Postpartum Depression
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10458; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph181910458 - 05 Oct 2021
Viewed by 713
Abstract
Negative experiences with childbirth might have a negative impact on a woman’s overall health, including a higher risk of postpartum depression. The aim of the study was to examine the association between birth satisfaction and the risk of postpartum depression (PPD). A 30-item [...] Read more.
Negative experiences with childbirth might have a negative impact on a woman’s overall health, including a higher risk of postpartum depression. The aim of the study was to examine the association between birth satisfaction and the risk of postpartum depression (PPD). A 30-item version of the Birth Satisfaction Scale (BSS) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) were used, as well as the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). The study included 584 women (mean age 30.6 ± 4.9), 2 to 4 days postpartum. In the regression model, the negative effect of birth satisfaction on the risk of postpartum depression was shown: a lower level of satisfaction with childbirth was a significant predictor of a higher risk of PPD (β = −0.18, 95% CI = −0.08; −0.03). The regression model was controlled for the effect of the sociodemographic factors (such as education or marital status) and clinical variables (such as parity, type of delivery, psychiatric history, levels of prenatal stress). Levels of prenatal stress (β = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.27; 0.39), psychiatric history (β = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.01; 3.09), parity (β = −0.12, 95% CI = −1.82; −0.32) and type of delivery (β = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.20; 1.94) were also significantly associated with the levels of postnatal depression. The current study confirmed the association between the level of birth satisfaction and the risk of developing PPD, i.e., a lower satisfaction with childbirth may increase the risk of developing PPD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal Delivery Nursing and Female Health)
Article
Hospital Childbirth: Perspectives of Women and Professionals for a Positive Experience—A Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10238; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph181910238 - 29 Sep 2021
Viewed by 424
Abstract
The perception and interpretation of childbirth are changing as values change. This requires women and professionals to adapt to new circumstances. The objective of this study was to analyze the perspectives of women and professionals on hospital birth and to identify improvement areas [...] Read more.
The perception and interpretation of childbirth are changing as values change. This requires women and professionals to adapt to new circumstances. The objective of this study was to analyze the perspectives of women and professionals on hospital birth and to identify improvement areas in order to achieve a positive perinatal experience. A qualitative prospective study with a phenomenological approach was conducted using semi-structured interviews with women, two and eight months after childbirth, participant observation, and professional focus groups. The analysis of the transcribed texts involved a thematic inductive approach. Four improvement areas emerged from the analysis: (a) strengthening communication and the therapeutic relationship; (b) unifying criteria between hospitals and primary care centers to provide coordinated and coherent information; (c) involvement of the partner in the whole process of pregnancy-childbirth-puerperium; (d) improvement of the spaces used in prenatal care and births. The need for a continuity of care from the beginning of pregnancy to the postpartum period is emphasized, which requires an improvement in information, participation, and the promotion of shared decision-making. To this end, coordinated interdisciplinary work, involvement of the partner and the improvement of the spaces used in prenatal care and births are essential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal Delivery Nursing and Female Health)
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