Special Issue "Measuring Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior for the Next Decade: What Does the Future Hold?"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Alexis Le Faucheur
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sport sciences and physical education department, Ecole normale supérieure de Rennes, Campus de Ker Lann, 35170 Bruz, France
Interests: exercise physiology; physical activity and energy expenditure measurement; wearable monitors; accelerometry; global positioning system; peripheral artery disease; intermittent claudication
Prof. Scott Duncan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Human Potential Centre, School of Sport and Recreation, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Interests: Physical activity and sedentary behaviour assessment, risk and play in children, environmental determinants of health and wellbeing, quantitative research design and analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Alan Donnelly
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences / Health Research Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland
Interests: Physical behaviors and their influence on health, particularly how time spent standing, sitting and in physical activity impact health risk in different populations. The validity and reliability of accelerometers to measure time spent in the different physical behaviours.

Special Issue Information

The use of wearable monitors for tracking health and fitness is becoming increasingly prevalent in modern life. In the last decade, we have seen a rapid increase in the number of commercially available wearable monitors, leaving the impression that almost everything is measurable at any time. The same period has also seen a proliferation of research relating to the use of wearable monitors to measure physical activity and sedentary behavior. The next generation of sensor and data science technologies provides unprecedented possibilities for assessing free-living human movement, but we need to ensure that what we choose to measure is relevant and accurate. This is of particular importance for public health, where the use of wearable monitors in the context of mHealth holds real potential for enhancing future health systems (WHO, 2011).
In this Special Issue entitled “Measuring Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior for the Next Decade: What Does the Future Hold?”, we invite you to share your work relating to the measurement of physical activity (PA) and sedentary (SED) behaviors in the context of health. Particular emphasis will be placed on the following topics:

1) Is my standard really a gold standard? The issue of the reference measures for assessing PA and SED behavior in the real-life context.
2) PA and SED behavior recognition and classification in the context of real-life: facts and flaws.
3) The demise of the activity count? Raw data in the new era of accelerometry.
4) From uni- to multi-modal assessment PA and SED behavior.
5) Scaling up the use of PA and SED behaviors assessment using wearable monitors in epidemiological research.
6) New approaches in clinical populations: moving from physical activity to physical (functional) capacity assessment.

Manuscripts that offer innovative and future-focused perspectives on these research areas will be prioritized. Review articles will be invited by the editorial team; however, authors interested in submitting an unsolicited review should first contact the Guest Editor to outline their potential topic prior to submission.

Prof. Scott Duncan
Prof. Alexis Le Faucheur
Prof. Dr. Alan Donnelly
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wearable monitors
  • validity
  • reliability
  • accelerometry
  • GPS
  • heart rate
  • steps
  • physical activity classification
  • physical activity guidelines and epidemiology
  • sedentary behavior
  • health
  • chronic conditions

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
How Accurate and Precise Can We Measure the Posture and the Energy Expenditure Component of Sedentary Behaviour with One Sensor?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5782; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115782 - 27 May 2021
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Abstract
Sedentary behaviour is an emergent public health topic, but there is still no method to simultaneously measure both components of sedentary behaviour—posture and energy expenditure—with one sensor. This study investigated the accuracy and precision of measuring sedentary time when combining the proprietary processing [...] Read more.
Sedentary behaviour is an emergent public health topic, but there is still no method to simultaneously measure both components of sedentary behaviour—posture and energy expenditure—with one sensor. This study investigated the accuracy and precision of measuring sedentary time when combining the proprietary processing of a posture sensor (activPAL) with a new energy expenditure algorithm and the proprietary processing of a movement sensor (ActiGraph) with a published posture algorithm. One hundred office workers wore both sensors for an average of 7 days. The activPAL algorithm development used 38 and the subsequent independent method comparison 62 participants. The single sensor sedentary estimates were compared with Bland–Atman statistics to the Posture and Physical Activity Index, a combined measurement with both sensors. All single-sensor methods overestimated sedentary time. However, adding the algorithms reduced the overestimation from 129 to 21 (activPAL) and from 84 to 7 min a day (ActiGraph), with far narrower 95% limits of agreements. Thus, combining the proprietary data with the algorithms is an easy way to increase the accuracy and precision of the single sensor sedentary estimates and leads to sedentary estimates that are more precise at the individual level than those of the proprietary processing are at the group level. Full article
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Article
Influence of the Duration and Timing of Data Collection on Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity, Sedentary Time and Associated Insulin Resistance
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4950; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094950 - 06 May 2021
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Abstract
Accelerometry is a commonly used method to determine physical activity in clinical studies, but the duration and timing of measurement have seldom been addressed. We aimed to evaluate possible changes in the measured outcomes and associations with insulin resistance during four weeks of [...] Read more.
Accelerometry is a commonly used method to determine physical activity in clinical studies, but the duration and timing of measurement have seldom been addressed. We aimed to evaluate possible changes in the measured outcomes and associations with insulin resistance during four weeks of accelerometry data collection. This study included 143 participants (median age of 59 (IQR9) years; mean BMI of 30.7 (SD4) kg/m2; 41 men). Sedentary and standing time, breaks in sedentary time, and different intensities of physical activity were measured with hip-worn accelerometers. Differences in the accelerometer-based results between weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4 were analyzed by mixed models, differences during winter and summer by two-way ANOVA, and the associations between insulin resistance and cumulative means of accelerometer results during weeks 1 to 4 by linear models. Mean accelerometry duration was 24 (SD3) days. Sedentary time decreased after three weeks of measurement. More physical activity was measured during summer compared to winter. The associations between insulin resistance and sedentary behavior and light physical activity were non-significant after the first week of measurement, but the associations turned significant in two to three weeks. If the purpose of data collection is to reveal associations between accelerometer-measured outcomes and tenuous health outcomes, such as insulin sensitivity, data collection for at least three weeks may be needed. Full article
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Article
Is Sitting Always Inactive and Standing Always Active? A Simultaneous Free-Living activPal and ActiGraph Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8864; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17238864 - 28 Nov 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1371
Abstract
Sedentary Behavior (SB), defined as sitting with minimal physical activity, is an emergent public health topic. However, the measurement of SB considers either posture (e.g., activPal) or physical activity (e.g., ActiGraph), and thus neglects either active sitting or inactive standing. The aim of [...] Read more.
Sedentary Behavior (SB), defined as sitting with minimal physical activity, is an emergent public health topic. However, the measurement of SB considers either posture (e.g., activPal) or physical activity (e.g., ActiGraph), and thus neglects either active sitting or inactive standing. The aim of this study was to determine the true amount of active sitting and inactive standing in daily life, and to analyze by how much these behaviors falsify the single sensors’ sedentary estimates. Sedentary time of 100 office workers estimated with activPal and ActiGraph was therefore compared with Bland-Altman statistics to a combined sensor analysis, the posture and physical activity index (POPAI). POPAI classified each activPal sitting and standing event into inactive or active using the ActiGraph counts. Participants spent 45.0% [32.2%–59.1%] of the waking hours inactive sitting (equal to SB), 13.7% [7.8%–21.6%] active sitting, and 12.0% [5.7%–24.1%] inactive standing (mean [5th–95th percentile]). The activPal overestimated sedentary time by 30.3% [12.3%–48.4%] and the ActiGraph by 22.5% [3.2%–41.8%] (bias [95% limit-of-agreement]). The results showed that sitting is not always inactive, and standing is not always active. Caution should therefore be paid when interpreting the activPal (ignoring active sitting) and ActiGraph (ignoring inactive standing) measured time as SB. Full article
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Systematic Review
Validity and Reliability of IPAQ-SF and GPAQ for Assessing Sedentary Behaviour in Adults in the European Union: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4602; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094602 - 26 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Current lifestyles are marked by sedentary behaviour; thus, it is of great importance for policymaking to have valid and reliable tools to measure sedentary behaviour in order to combat it. Therefore, the aim of this review and meta-analysis is to critically review, assess, [...] Read more.
Current lifestyles are marked by sedentary behaviour; thus, it is of great importance for policymaking to have valid and reliable tools to measure sedentary behaviour in order to combat it. Therefore, the aim of this review and meta-analysis is to critically review, assess, and compile the reliability, criterion validity, and construct validity of the single-item sedentary behaviour questions within national language versions of most commonly used international physical activity questionnaires for adults in the European Union: The International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form and the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire. A total of 1749 records were screened, 287 full-text papers were read, and 14 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The results and quality of studies were evaluated by the Quality Assessment of Physical Activity Questionnaires checklist. Meta-analysis indicated moderate to high reliability (rw = 0.59) and concurrent validity (rw = 0.55) of national language versions of single-item sedentary behaviour questions. Criterion validity was rather low (rw = 0.23) but in concordance with previous studies. The risk of bias analysis highlighted the poor reporting of methods and results, with a total bias score of 0.42. Thus, we recommend using multi-item SB questionnaires and smart trackers for providing information on SB rather than single-item sedentary behaviour questions in physical activity questionnaires. Full article
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