Special Issue "Musculoskeletal Disorders, Physical Rehabilitation and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Carolina Fernández-Lao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Physiotherapy, University of Granada, and Biohealth Research Institute in Granada (ibs.GRANADA) E-18016 Granada, Spain 2. “Cuídate” Support Unit for Oncology Patients (UAPO), Sport and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), E-18016 Granada, Spain
Interests: cancer related physical impairments; cancer related musculoskeletal disorders; chronic pain; central sensitization processes
Dr. Francisco Artacho-Cordon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1.“Cuídate” Support Unit for Oncology Patients (UAPO), Sport and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), University of Granada, E-18016 Granada, Spain2. Department of Radiology and Physical Medicine, University of Granada, E-18016 Granada, Spain.
Interests: women health; chronic pain; physical fitness; chronic fatigue; functional impairments

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Musculoskeletal disorders are very common, and their consequences make an important contribution to disability. The current lifestyle promotes a lack of movement associated to a wide range of related physical and psycho-social disorders. On the other hand, there are multiple pathologies that can affect muscles, bones, and joints in a primary or secondary way, either permanently or temporarily. The resulting economic burden is considerable, with a continuous rise as the population ages. Physical rehabilitation is a holistic approach with physical and psycho-social applications in people with acute and chronic conditions, such as musculoskeletal and neurological disorders, amputations, pelvic organ disorders, cardiorespiratory issues, cancer, disability pain and dysfunction, among others. The aim of this Special Issue is to explore all the aspects of the prevention, diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal disorders and physical rehabilitation processes through a multidisciplinary point of view. The Editor’s interest lies in providing a platform for the publication of high-quality papers documenting new developments and recent advantages in all fields, including repetitive motion injuries, trauma disorders, occupational disorders, overuse syndromes, neurological issues, cardiorespiratory diseases and soft tissue disorders.

Submissions on other topics are welcome and can be discussed with the Guest Editors.

Dr. Carolina Fernández-Lao
Dr. Francisco Artacho-Cordon
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rehabilitation
  • musculoskeletal diseases
  • chronic disease
  • neurological issues
  • cardiorespiratory issues
  • cancer
  • occupational disorders
  • rheumatologic disorders
  • bone fractures
  • disability
  • dysfunction

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Prevalence and Factors Associated with Musculoskeletal Disorders among Secondary Schoolteachers in Hail, Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Survey
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6632; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126632 - 20 Jun 2021
Viewed by 487
Abstract
Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the most common occupational health hazards and serious health concerns among teachers. About 39% to 95% of teachers suffer from musculoskeletal pain that can lead to a decline in their performance, frequent sick leaves and early retirement, [...] Read more.
Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the most common occupational health hazards and serious health concerns among teachers. About 39% to 95% of teachers suffer from musculoskeletal pain that can lead to a decline in their performance, frequent sick leaves and early retirement, and can have a negative impact on their quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for MSDs among secondary schoolteachers in Hail, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study was conducted through an electronic survey. A self-reported and validated Arabic version of the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was used. Participants were recruited randomly through a two-stage sampling technique. A total of 251 respondents (57.8% males and 42.2% females) returned the questionnaire. The overall prevalence of MSDs was 87.3%. Female teachers (95.3%) suffered more than their male counterparts (81.4%). The most common site was the lower back (62.55%), followed by the shoulders (53.39%) and knees (41.04%). Most of the participants (72.7%) reported MSDs in multiple sites. Binomial logistic regression predicted that smoking is a significant risk factor for lower back disorders (p < 0.05). A high prevalence of MSDs can be due to a substantial lack of awareness and practice of ergonomics, which warrant the development of preventive strategies and educational programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musculoskeletal Disorders, Physical Rehabilitation and Health)
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Article
Risk of Mortality and Readmission among Patients with Pelvic Fracture and Urinary Tract Infection: A Population-Based Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4868; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094868 - 03 May 2021
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Abstract
Patients with pelvic fractures could encounter various complications during or after treatments. This cohort study investigated the risk of mortality and readmissions in patients with pelvic fractures, with or without urinary tract infections (UTIs), within 30 days following the pelvic fractures. This retrospective [...] Read more.
Patients with pelvic fractures could encounter various complications during or after treatments. This cohort study investigated the risk of mortality and readmissions in patients with pelvic fractures, with or without urinary tract infections (UTIs), within 30 days following the pelvic fractures. This retrospective cohort study examined claim records from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000). We selected patients hospitalized with pelvic fractures between 1997 and 2013 for study. Patients who had index data before 2000 or after 2010 (n = 963), who died before the index date (n = 64), who were aged <18 years (n = 94), or who had a pelvic injury (n = 31) were excluded. In total, the study cohort comprised 1623 adult patients; 115 had UTIs, and 1508 patients without UTIs were used as a comparison cohort. Multivariate analysis with a multiple Cox regression model and Kaplan–Meier survival analysis were performed to analyze the data. Our results showed that the 1-year mortality rate (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.25–4.29) and readmission rate (adjusted HR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.26–3.34) of the UTI group were significantly higher than those of the non-UTI group. Moreover, the Kaplan–Meier curve for the 1-year follow-up indicated that the UTI group had a higher cumulative risk of both mortality and hospital readmission compared with the non-UTI group. In conclusion, among patients with pelvic fracture, patients with UTI were associated with increased risks of mortality and readmission. Physicians must pay more attention to such patients to prevent UTIs among patients with pelvic fractures during hospitalization and conduct a follow-up after discharge within at least 1 year. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musculoskeletal Disorders, Physical Rehabilitation and Health)
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Article
Association of Self-Reported Physical Fitness with Pregnancy Related Symptoms the GESTAFIT Project
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3345; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18073345 - 24 Mar 2021
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Abstract
We explored the association of physical fitness (PF) with pregnancy-related symptoms, at the 16th and 34th gestational weeks (g.w.). The International Fitness Scale and the Pregnancy Symptoms Inventory were employed to assess self-reported PF and pregnancy-related symptoms, respectively. At the 16th g.w. greater [...] Read more.
We explored the association of physical fitness (PF) with pregnancy-related symptoms, at the 16th and 34th gestational weeks (g.w.). The International Fitness Scale and the Pregnancy Symptoms Inventory were employed to assess self-reported PF and pregnancy-related symptoms, respectively. At the 16th g.w. greater self-reported overall PF was associated with lower incidence of urinary frequency (p = 0.020); greater overall PF, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), muscular strength and speed-agility were associated with lower incidence of tiredness-fatigue (all, p < 0.05); greater overall PF and speed-agility were associated with lower incidence of poor sleep (both, p < 0.05); greater CRF and flexibility were associated with lower limitations by tiredness-fatigue (both, p < 0.05); and greater flexibility was associated with lower limitations by poor sleep (p = 0.021). At the 34th g.w. greater self-reported overall PF, CRF and muscular strength were associated with lower incidence of tiredness-fatigue (all, p < 0.05); greater CRF was associated with lower incidence of poor sleep (p = 0.019); and, greater flexibility was associated with lower incidence of increased vaginal discharge (p = 0.023). Adequate levels of PF, especially CRF, may help women to cope with the most endorsed pregnancy-related symptoms and its limitations, especially tiredness-fatigue and poor sleep. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musculoskeletal Disorders, Physical Rehabilitation and Health)
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Review

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Review
Systematic Review of Therapeutic Physical Exercise in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis over Time
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1074; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18031074 - 26 Jan 2021
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Abstract
Background: the main objective of this study was to analyze the potential short-, medium- and long-term effects of a therapeutic physical exercise (TFE) programme on the functionality of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, measured with the Revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Scale (ALSFRS-R) [...] Read more.
Background: the main objective of this study was to analyze the potential short-, medium- and long-term effects of a therapeutic physical exercise (TFE) programme on the functionality of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, measured with the Revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Scale (ALSFRS-R) scale. Methods: a systematic review of the PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane, Scientific Electronic Library Online (Scielo), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDline) databases was carried out. The information was filtered using the following Medical Subjects Heading (MeSH) terms: “Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis”, “Physical Therapy”, and “Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine”. The internal validity of the selected documents was evaluated using the PEDro scale. The study included clinical trials published in the last 5 years in which one of the interventions was therapeutic physical exercise in patients with ALS, using the ALSFRS-R as the main outcome variable and functional variables as secondary variables. Results: 10 clinical trials were analyzed, with an internal validity of 5–7 points. The TFE groups showed significant short-, medium- and long-term differences, obtaining a mean difference of 5.8 points compared to the 7.6 points obtained by the control groups, at six months, measured with ALSFRS-R. In addition, the participants showed significant improvements in functional abilities in the short, medium and long terms. Conclusions: Therapeutic physical exercise could contribute to slowing down the deterioration of the musculature of patients with ALS, thus facilitating their performance in activities of daily living, based on the significant differences shown by these individuals in the short, medium and long term both in subjective perception, measured with ALSFRS-R, and functional capacities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musculoskeletal Disorders, Physical Rehabilitation and Health)
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Other

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Systematic Review
Effect of Myofascial Therapy on Pain and Functionality of the Upper Extremities in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4420; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094420 - 21 Apr 2021
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Abstract
(1) Objective: The purpose was to analyze the effectiveness of myofascial therapy on musculoskeletal pain and functionality of the upper extremities in female breast cancer survivors, and to evaluate the changes in range of motion, quality of life, and mood state of these [...] Read more.
(1) Objective: The purpose was to analyze the effectiveness of myofascial therapy on musculoskeletal pain and functionality of the upper extremities in female breast cancer survivors, and to evaluate the changes in range of motion, quality of life, and mood state of these patients. (2) Methods: Systematic searches were performed on the MEDLINE/PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Physiotherapy Evidence Databases for articles published until October 2020, in order to identify randomized controlled trials which analyzed the effectiveness of myofascial therapy as compared to a control group, passive treatment, placebo, or another intervention, and allowed co-interventions on female breast cancer survivors. Two reviewers examined the sources individually, calculated the risk of bias and extracted the data (PROSPERO number CRD42020215823). (3) Results: A total of eight RCTs were included. The results suggested that myofascial therapy does not have a greater statistically significant immediate effect on pain intensity (SMD: −0.15; 95% CI −0.48, 0.19), functionality (SMD: −0.17; 95% CI −0.43, 0.09) and range of motion in flexion (SMD: 0.30; 95% CI −0.13, 0.74) than an inactive, passive treatment or another intervention. However, a statistically significant result was observed for the abduction shoulder in favor of the experimental group (SMD: 0.46; 95% CI 0.05, 0.87; p = 0.03). (4) Conclusion: In general, although we found greater overall effects in support of the intervention with myofascial therapy than other control groups/types of interventions, the subgroup analysis revealed inconsistent results supporting myofascial therapy applied to breast cancer survivors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musculoskeletal Disorders, Physical Rehabilitation and Health)
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Study Protocol
Effectiveness of Antalgic Therapies in Patients with Vertebral Bone Metastasis: A Protocol for a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3991; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18083991 - 10 Apr 2021
Viewed by 610
Abstract
There is no systematic review that has identified existing studies evaluating the pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention for pain management in patients with bone metastasis. To fill this gap in the literature, this systematic review with meta-analysis aims to evaluate the effectiveness of different [...] Read more.
There is no systematic review that has identified existing studies evaluating the pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention for pain management in patients with bone metastasis. To fill this gap in the literature, this systematic review with meta-analysis aims to evaluate the effectiveness of different antalgic therapies (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) in the improvement of pain of these patients. To this end, this protocol has been written according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) and registered in PROSPERO (CRD42020135762). A systematic search will be carried out in four international databases: Medline (Via PubMed), Web of Science, Cochrane Library and SCOPUS, to select the randomized controlled clinical trials. The Risk of Bias Tool developed by Cochrane will be used to assess the risk of bias and the quality of the identified studies. A narrative synthesis will be used to describe and compare the studies, and after the data extraction, random effects model and a subgroup analyses will be performed according to the type of intervention, if possible. This protocol aims to generate a systematic review that compiles and synthesizes the best and most recent evidence on the treatment of pain derived from vertebral metastasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musculoskeletal Disorders, Physical Rehabilitation and Health)
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