Special Issue "Neurotrauma and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nicola Montemurro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurosurgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Pisana (AOUP), University of Pisa, 56010 Pisa, Italy
Interests: brain tumor; glioblastoma multiforme; low-grade glioma; meningioma; schwannoma; augmented reality; tractography
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Paolo Perrini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Translational Research and of New Surgical and Medical Technologies; University of Pisa, 56010 Pisa, Italy;Department of Neurosurgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Pisana (AOUP), 56010 Pisa, Italy
Interests: neurosurgery; spine surgery; brain tumor; neuroanatomy; trigeminal neuralgia; subarachnoid hemorrhage; cerebrovascular disease; craniocervical junction; hydrocephalus

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neurotrauma is a critical public health problem that deserves the attention of the world's health community. Estimates of brain and spinal cord injury occurrence indicate that these injuries cause enormous losses to individuals, families and communities. They result in a large number of deaths and impairments leading to permanent disabilities.

Neurotrauma refers to injuries that involve the brain, nerves or spine. Neurotrauma is an emergency for which it is important to seek treatment immediately. Traumatic brain or spine injuries lead to intensive care hospitalization or surgical treatment, but they can have long-lasting effects, including cognitive impairment, nerve damage, leaking spinal fluid, pain and posttraumatic stress disorder.

Traumatic brain injury can cause long-term physical disability and complex neuro-behavioral effects, which disrupt quality of life, employment prospects and interpersonal relationships. Spinal cord injury can also cause long-term physical disability and complex complications, which disrupt quality of life, including limiting physical and social mobility, psychological complications (depression and suicide) and medical complications, often due to autonomic nervous system dysfunction.

This Special Issue will explore the public health implications and epidemiology of brain and spine trauma, explore emerging research and innovative strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality, report clinical series reporting surgical, medical and rehabilitation treatments and highlight best practices to address physicians. We welcome original papers, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, clinical images and thorough reviews on this interesting topic.

This Special Issue aims to provide a complex source of up-to-date data used by emergency physicians, neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, orthopedists, maxillofacial surgeons, radiologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, critical care specialists, rehabilitation physicians and neuropsychologists.

We invite you to submit articles on topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Penetrating brain injury
  • Depressed skull fracture
  • Craniofacial trauma
  • Epidural and subdural hematoma
  • Traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage
  • Traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage/brain contusion
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Craniocervical spine injury
  • Cervical spine injury
  • Thoracolumbar spine injury
  • Traumatic spondylolisthesis
  • Neuroimaging
  • Peripheral nervous system
  • Supportive care
  • Posttraumatic rehabilitation
  • Neurotrauma
  • Pain
  • Critical care medicine
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder

Dr. Nicola Montemurro
Prof. Dr. Paolo Perrini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • injuries
  • traumatic brain injury
  • spine injury
  • prevention and diagnosis
  • risk factors
  • elderly patients
  • polytrauma
  • critical care medicine
  • sport injuries
  • rehabilitation
  • craniofacial trauma
  • neurosurgery
  • peripheral nervous system
  • posttraumatic rehabilitation
  • pain
  • neuroimaging
  • critical care medicine
  • cognitive impairment
  • posttraumatic stress disorder
  • supportive care.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Article
Quality of Life and Physical Activity of Persons with Spinal Cord Injury
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9148; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179148 - 30 Aug 2021
Viewed by 392
Abstract
The higher quality of life of people with spinal cord injury is closely related with their reintegration into the social environment. Social reintegration is a demanding and complex process, requiring individuals to become active again and acquire age-, gender-, and culture-appropriate roles and [...] Read more.
The higher quality of life of people with spinal cord injury is closely related with their reintegration into the social environment. Social reintegration is a demanding and complex process, requiring individuals to become active again and acquire age-, gender-, and culture-appropriate roles and social status. It also involves independence and productive behavior as part of multiple interpersonal relationships with family, friends, and others. In order to establish whether individuals with spinal cord injury who are physically active subjectively rate their quality of life to be higher compared to those who are not, sixty-two respondents from Slovenia with spinal cord injury were interviewed. Thirty-one of them were physically active, and 31 were not. The level of injury of the responders was from Th6–Th12. The participants gave the highest assessments to their interpersonal relationships, and the lowest to their satisfaction with material prosperity. Data comparison showed that subjective estimates in all areas of quality of life are higher in respondents who were involved in physical activity after their injury. The results may encourage persons with spinal cord injury to participate more often in sports programs, and also encourage others to do so. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotrauma and Health)
Article
Reducible Nonunited Type II Odontoid Fracture with Atlantoaxial Instability: Outcomes of Two Different Fixation Techniques
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7990; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157990 - 28 Jul 2021
Viewed by 433
Abstract
Displaced nonunited type II odontoid fracture can result in atlantoaxial instability, causing delayed cervical myelopathy. Both Magerl’s C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation technique and Harms-Goel C1-C2 screw-rod segmental fixation technique are effective techniques to provide stability. This study aimed to demonstrate the results of [...] Read more.
Displaced nonunited type II odontoid fracture can result in atlantoaxial instability, causing delayed cervical myelopathy. Both Magerl’s C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation technique and Harms-Goel C1-C2 screw-rod segmental fixation technique are effective techniques to provide stability. This study aimed to demonstrate the results of two surgical fixation techniques for the treatment of reducible nonunited type II odontoid fracture with atlantoaxial instability. Medical records of patients with reducible nonunited type II odontoid fracture hospitalized for spinal fusion between April 2007 and April 2018 were reviewed. For each patient, specific surgical fixation, either Magerl’s C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation technique augmented with supplemental wiring or Harms-Goel C1-C2 screw-rod fixation technique, was performed according to our management protocol. We reported the fusion rate, fusion period, and complications for each technique. Of 21 patients, 10 patients were treated with Magerl’s C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation technique augmented with supplemental wiring, and 11 were treated with Harms-Goel C1-C2 screw-rod fixation technique. The bony fusion rate was 100% in both groups. The mean time to fusion was 69.7 (95%CI 53.1, 86.3) days in Magerl’s C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation technique and 75.2 (95%CI 51.8, 98.6) days in Harms-Goel C1-C2 screw-rod fixation technique. No severe complications were observed in either group. Displaced reducible, nonunited type II odontoid fracture with cervical myelopathy should be treated by surgery. Both fixation techniques promote bony fusion and provide substantial construct stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotrauma and Health)
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Article
Secular Trend, Seasonal Variation, Epidemiological Pattern, and Outcome of Traumatic Head Injuries Due to Road Traffic Accidents in Aseer, Saudi Arabia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6623; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126623 - 20 Jun 2021
Viewed by 571
Abstract
Road traffic accidents (RTAs) are a leading cause of traumatic head injury (THI) and are regarded as a public health problem in Saudi Arabia. This hospital-based retrospective study aims to provide data on the frequency, type, and distribution of RTA-related THIs over the [...] Read more.
Road traffic accidents (RTAs) are a leading cause of traumatic head injury (THI) and are regarded as a public health problem in Saudi Arabia. This hospital-based retrospective study aims to provide data on the frequency, type, and distribution of RTA-related THIs over the past decade; demonstrate their time trend and seasonality; and decipher age and sex differences in RTA-related THIs and their outcome. The results showed a decline in the number of RTA-related THIs between 2010 and 2019. The patients had a mean age of 26.16 ± 16.27 years, and the male-to-female ratio was 10.8:1. Head injury with multiple lesions was the most common diagnosis, followed by cerebral contusion and skull fracture (32.1%, 12.9%, and 11.2%, respectively). Subdural hematoma (SDH) and skull fracture were significantly more common in patients aged ≥60 years (standard residual > 1.96), and significantly less common in those aged ≤17 years (standard residual < 1.96), compared to other age groups. Males experienced significantly more SDHs than females (standard residual = −2.8, p = 0.029). The length of hospital stay was positively correlated with age (Spearman’s rho = 0.057, p = 0.046). No seasonal variation was found. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotrauma and Health)
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Case Report
Massive Edema of the Lower Limbs in Patients after Spinal Cord Injury—One Picture, Different Diagnoses
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4219; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18084219 - 16 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 690
Abstract
Diagnosis of the cause of massive edema of the lower limbs in patients after spinal cord injury (SCI) can be difficult because of loss of pain sensation, commonly occurring in this group of patients. This paper reviews several different pathologies that can lead [...] Read more.
Diagnosis of the cause of massive edema of the lower limbs in patients after spinal cord injury (SCI) can be difficult because of loss of pain sensation, commonly occurring in this group of patients. This paper reviews several different pathologies that can lead to lower-limb edema and the associated diagnostic difficulties. We present four cases of patients with massive edemas of lower limbs at different times after SCI undergoing treatment in the Department of Rehabilitation, University Hospital in Bydgoszcz, Poland. All patients had a lack of pain sensation in the lower limbs and significantly elevated levels of D-dimer. In two cases, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and intramuscular hematomas (IHs) were diagnosed. IHs were probably a consequence of antithrombotic treatments implemented due to the occurrence of DVT. Heterotopic ossification (HO) was diagnosed in a third case, and, in another patient, who was hospitalized for the longest period after injury, we found humeral bone fractures. Heterotopic ossification, intramuscular haematomas, and bone fractures of the lower limb can mimic DVT. Careful observation of the edema evolution is recommended, as the onset of new symptoms may indicate a different cause of edema from that initially established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurotrauma and Health)
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