Special Issue "Advances in New Preventative and Therapeutic Strategies of Chronic Disease"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Steven T. Haller
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Medicine, The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH 43614, USA
2. Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH 43614, USA
Interests: The focus of my research is to investigate the pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic mechanisms leading to the development of end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular disease. In addition, my laboratory is interrogating the health effects of exposure to cyanotoxins and emergent chemicals of concern in pre-existing disease states.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. David J. Kennedy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Medicine, The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH 43614, USA 2. Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH 43614, USA
Interests: Our lab studies how interrelated organ systems such as the heart, kidney and liver regulate cellular damage (particularly inflammation and fibrosis) and repair, during the course of chronic ailments such as heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, obesity and chronic kidney disease. We are particularly interested in developing new preventative and therapeutic strategies to help people suffering from these diseases through establishing novel biomarkers and molecular diagnostics to assist risk stratification, as well as identifying new drugs and drug targets, and enhancing endogenous counter-regulatory mechanisms. Given our community’s ties to, and dependence on, the Great Lakes as sources of clean water for drinking, recreation, fishing and agriculture, our laboratory also places a special emphasis on discovering new diagnostic, preventative and therapeutic strategies targeting cellular damage caused by environmental stressors that impair our land–water–food nexus.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Humans are exposed to, or take in, food, water, air, and other environmental agents on a daily basis. At the same time, humans release non-natural substances into the environment, including personal care products, and prescription and illicit drugs. The combination of these exposures can exert profound effects on human and environmental health. This issue explores the contact of humans or other organisms with chemical, physical, and biologic stressors and their fate in living systems. Through Exposure Science and modern Toxicology, we aim to highlight how advanced ‘Omics’ approaches can help us to understand stressors that affect human and ecosystem health and interfaces, with sensor systems, analytical methods, molecular biology, computational tools, and bioinformatics. In particular, we aim to highlight how these multi-faceted approaches inform  advances in new preventative and therapeutic strategies for chronic diseases. Some of the key knowledge gaps in this area are:

  • The health implications of various routes and levels of exposure, including chronic, low dose exposure
  • Development of new technologies and/or approaches (e.g. bioinformatics, ‘Omics’, etc.) to detect endogenous or exogenous toxins which may assist in diagnostic monitoring and surveillance efforts, or inform decisions to protect human health
  • ‘Omics’-driven mechanistic studies of toxicity in various organ systems with a focus on developing potential therapeutic strategies
  • Monitoring and modeling toxin bioaccumulation in food chains and food webs
  • Exploiting novel metabolic and degradation pathways of toxins for potential clinical benefit
  • Epidemiology and population health measures, including the surveillance and identification of clusters
  • Public health policy efforts, including community level intervention and prevention strategies

Using the principles of exposure science, epidemiology and modern toxicology, we endeavor to demonstrate how state-of-the-art ‘Omics’ approaches can help us to understand how various toxins affect human and ecosystem health, with an aim to prevent or treat their harmful effects.

Dr. Steven T. Haller
Dr. David J. Kennedy
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • toxicology
  • emergent chemicals of concern
  • environmental toxins
  • human health
  • exposure science
  • sensors
  • ‘Omics’
  • epidemiology
  • therapeutics
  • prevention

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Association between Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphisms (BsmI and FokI) and Glycemic Control among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1595; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041595 - 08 Feb 2021
Viewed by 699
Abstract
(1) Background: Several studies have suggested that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene plays a role in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) susceptibility. Nonetheless, the association between T2DM and VDR polymorphisms remains inconclusive. We determined the genotype of VDR rs1544410 (BsmI) and rs2228570 [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Several studies have suggested that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene plays a role in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) susceptibility. Nonetheless, the association between T2DM and VDR polymorphisms remains inconclusive. We determined the genotype of VDR rs1544410 (BsmI) and rs2228570 (FokI) polymorphisms among Malaysian patients with T2DM and their association with glycemic control factors (vitamin D levels, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate). (2) Methods: A total of 189 participants comprising 126 patients with T2DM (63 with good glycemic control and 63 with poor glycemic control) and 63 healthy controls were enrolled in this case–control study. All biochemical assays were measured using spectrophotometric analysis. VDR gene FokI and BsmI polymorphisms were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction and endonuclease digestion. (3) Results: Our findings revealed no significant differences in VDR FokI and BsmI genotypes between participants with T2DM and healthy controls. Moreover, no significant association was observed between both single nucleotide polymorphisms and glycemic control factors. Participants with poor glycemic control had significantly lower serum magnesium levels and significantly higher HOMA-IR compared to the other groups. (4) Conclusions: The present study revealed that VDR gene BsmI and FokI polymorphisms were not significantly associated with T2DM. Full article
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