Special Issue "New Technologies, Rehabilitation and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Lydia M. Martín-Martín
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Physiotherapy, University of Granada, E-18016, Granada, Spain
2. Biohealth Research Institute in Granada (ibs.GRANADA), E18016, Granada, Spain
Interests: cancer; functionality; cognition; telehealth; hip fracture; occupational therapy
Dr. Mario Lozano-Lozan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Physiotherapy, University of Granada, E-18016, Granada, Spain
2. Biohealth Research Institute in Granada (ibs.GRANADA), E18016, Granada, Spain
Interests: oncological rehabilitation; bone metastases; breast cancer; ultrasound-guided rehabilitation; mobile health; telehealth; functionality; quality of life; occupational therapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The rapid progress of today's society in the management of different pathologies and their derived consequences has produced a change of paradigm in health care and disease. Similarly, different current situations of global impact have driven the rapid growth of the use of emerging technologies in the prevention, promotion, evaluation, and treatment of population health and clinical care. These emerging technologies; medical devices; mobile and web applications; and computer engineering, individual electronic assessment, and treatment devices have been postulated as useful and effective tools in the management of a wide range of pathologies. Therefore, the aim of this Special Issue is to explore new tools for addressing health and disease, through the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies.

Special interest:

  • New technologies applied to monitoring and assessment in rehabilitation and health;
  • New technologies applied to rehabilitation protocols in different health status.

The submission of other topics is welcome, and can be discussed with the Guest Editors.

Dr. Lydia M. Martín-Martín
Dr. Mario Lozano-Lozan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Telemedicine
  • Telehealth
  • Mobile health
  • mHealth
  • eHealth
  • Telerehabilitation
  • Remote consultation
  • Remote rehabilitation
  • Virtual rehabilitation
  • Wearable electronic device
  • Wearable technologies.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Effects of Tele-Rehabilitation Compared with Home-Based in-Person Rehabilitation for Older Adult’s Function after Hip Fracture
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5493; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105493 - 20 May 2021
Viewed by 790
Abstract
This study aimed to examine the effect of a multidisciplinary tele-rehabilitation program on functional recovery of older adults with hip fracture compared with home-based in-person rehabilitation. In this single-blinded, non-randomized clinical trial, we included older with hip fracture. The tele-rehabilitation group received a [...] Read more.
This study aimed to examine the effect of a multidisciplinary tele-rehabilitation program on functional recovery of older adults with hip fracture compared with home-based in-person rehabilitation. In this single-blinded, non-randomized clinical trial, we included older with hip fracture. The tele-rehabilitation group received a 12-week tele-rehabilitation program (supervised by their family caregivers). The control group received the usual postoperative rehabilitation provided by the Andalusian health system (Spain). The primary outcome was the patient-reported functional status assessed with the Functional Independence Measure. We also measured performance-based functional recovery using the Timed Up and Go Test and Short Physical Performance Battery. We performed both a per-protocol (62 participants; 28 tele-rehabilitation and 34 control groups) and an intention-to-treat analysis (71 participants; 35 tele-rehabilitation and 36 control groups). Participants who used the tele-rehabilitation program had higher Functional Independence Measure scores (high effect size: 0.98 Cohen’s d; p < 0.001) and better performance in the Timed Up and Go Test (medium effect size: 0.63 Cohen’s d; p = 0.025) compared with the control group. Differences between groups post-intervention were not statistically significant in the Short Physical Performance Battery. The tele-rehabilitation intervention proposed in this study is a valuable treatment option in the recovery process for older adults with hip fracture. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02968589. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Technologies, Rehabilitation and Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Are Physicians in Saudi Arabia Ready for Patients with an Insulin Pump? An Examination of Physician Knowledge and Attitude
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9394; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249394 - 15 Dec 2020
Viewed by 607
Abstract
Aims: The use of insulin pump therapy in patients with diabetes continues to expand worldwide. Although insulin pumps have been demonstrated to be successful and safe, physicians’ insufficient knowledge may carry a risk to the patients using insulin pumps. This study aimed to [...] Read more.
Aims: The use of insulin pump therapy in patients with diabetes continues to expand worldwide. Although insulin pumps have been demonstrated to be successful and safe, physicians’ insufficient knowledge may carry a risk to the patients using insulin pumps. This study aimed to assess the attitude and knowledge among physicians in Saudi Arabia regarding insulin pump therapy. Methods: Three hundred and seven physicians, including 82 family physicians, 76 pediatricians, 48 internists, 27 pediatric endocrinologists, 17 adult endocrinologists, and 57 physicians from other specialties, completed a questionnaire that evaluated their knowledge and attitude toward insulin pump therapy. Results: Among the evaluated physicians, 56.7% had poor knowledge level, while 53.4% had positive attitude. Statistical tests revealed that older age, years of practice, consultancy, and endocrinology specialty were the influential factors of knowledge (p < 0.001). Non-endocrinologists demonstrated poor knowledge despite seeing patients with insulin pumps; however, those who had previously cared for such patients scored significantly higher knowledge scores. Conclusions: There was a significant lack of knowledge among physicians regarding insulin pump therapy; however, the perceived attitude of physicians toward this therapy was deemed positive. These findings support the implementation of insulin pump education programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Technologies, Rehabilitation and Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop