Special Issue "Nursing and COVID-19"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Nursing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Richard Gray
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
Interests: mental health services; psychosocial interventions; co-morbidity; workforce
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sonia Udod
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Nursing, University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada
Interests: nurse manager development; nurse leader role in transitions of care; nurses' work environments; health care quality; qualitative research approaches; healthcare leadership
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nurses have been a frontline workforce in managing the COVID-19 pandemic, and there are many important reflections and observations that need to be discussed and shared by clinicians and researchers. This Nursing Reports Special Issue on “Nursing and COVID-19” will provide a platform to highlight the issues and challenges faced by nurses practicing in hospital and community settings during the pandemic by bringing together experts to present evidence-based discussions on the impact, experience, and reality of providing evidence-based nursing care during the crisis. We are particularly interested in papers that examine the psychosocial impact of COVID-19 on nurses, showcase novel and innovative ways of delivering patient care (e.g., telehealth), and consider the organizational and management challenges of providing a safe and effective nursing service. This timely dialogue is highly relevant, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to profoundly impact the way in which we live and work.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Nursing Reports.

Prof. Dr. Richard Gray
Dr. Sonia Udod
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • nursing
  • pandemic
  • public health
  • workforce

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Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Article
Gender Bias and the Lack of Equity in Pandemic Nursing in China: A Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10273; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph181910273 - 29 Sep 2021
Viewed by 341
Abstract
There has long been a gender bias in medicine. This qualitative study aims to identify the experience of sexism among frontline female nurses and further explore their expectations and possible strategies to get rid of gender bias. This is a descriptive phenomenological study [...] Read more.
There has long been a gender bias in medicine. This qualitative study aims to identify the experience of sexism among frontline female nurses and further explore their expectations and possible strategies to get rid of gender bias. This is a descriptive phenomenological study of 23 female nurses with 11 ± 3.98 years of experience who spent 36 ± 6.50 days at the frontline during the initial COVID-19 outbreak. We employed Colaizzi’s phenomenological analysis method to understand the subjective experiences, revealing the following themes: (a) materialization of gender identity; (b) incoordinate relationships; (c) future voice of female nurses. The gender bias experienced by female frontline nurses further challenges their emotional identity and self-identity. Therefore, it is important to require extensive consciousness-raising and policy support to defend female nurses’ rights. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
Article
Analyzing the Impact of COVID-19 Trauma on Developing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Emergency Medical Workers in Spain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9132; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179132 - 30 Aug 2021
Viewed by 863
Abstract
The early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic presented the characteristics of a traumatic event that could trigger post-traumatic stress disorder. Emergency Medical Services workers are already a high-risk group due to their professional development. The research project aimed to analyse the impact of [...] Read more.
The early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic presented the characteristics of a traumatic event that could trigger post-traumatic stress disorder. Emergency Medical Services workers are already a high-risk group due to their professional development. The research project aimed to analyse the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on EMS professionals in terms of their mental health. For this purpose, we present a descriptive crosssectional study with survey methodology. A total of 317 EMS workers (doctors, nurses, and emergency medical technicians) were recruited voluntarily. Psychological distress, post-traumatic stress disorder, and insomnia were assessed. The instruments were the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), the Davidson Trauma Scale (DTS-8), and the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS-8). We found that 36% of respondents had psychological distress, 30.9% potentially had PTSD, and 60.9% experienced insomnia. Years of work experience were found to be positively correlated, albeit with low effect, with the PTSD score (r = 0.133). Finally, it can be stated that the COVID-19 pandemic has been a traumatic event for EMS workers. The number of professionals presenting psychological distress, possible PTSD, or insomnia increased dramatically during the early phases of the pandemic. This study highlights the need for mental health disorder prevention programmes for EMS workers in the face of a pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
Article
Investigating the Effective Factors of Using Personal Protective Equipment from the Perspective of Nurses Caring for COVID-19 Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7882; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157882 - 26 Jul 2021
Viewed by 739
Abstract
Considering the importance of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for preventing COVID-19 transmission, the aim of this study was to investigate the factors affecting the use of PPE from the perspective of the nurses caring for COVID-19 patients. This descriptive cross-sectional study surveyed [...] Read more.
Considering the importance of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for preventing COVID-19 transmission, the aim of this study was to investigate the factors affecting the use of PPE from the perspective of the nurses caring for COVID-19 patients. This descriptive cross-sectional study surveyed 240 nurses working in the central COVID-19 hospitals of Arak, Iran. Nurses were enrolled in the study by a convenience sampling method. The data collection tool was a validated questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 software using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and independent sample t-test. Environmental (4.24 ± 0.45), personal (4.16 ± 0.42), and organizational (4.04 ± 0.50) factors all contribute significantly to nursing attitudes about PPE use (p < 0.05). The average score, combining all identified factors, was 4.15 ± 0.31. The most influential factor contributing to appropriate use of PPE was environmental, while the least impactful parameters were related to rules and regulations. Environmental factors have the greatest impact on the use of PPE from the perspective of the nurses caring for patients with COVID-19. Managers and healthcare organizations should provide appropriate and adequate PPE to nurses, educate them on proper use, and monitor the process to resolve barriers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
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Article
The Transformational Experience of Junior Nurses Resulting from Providing Care to COVID-19 Patients: From Facing Hurdles to Achieving Psychological Growth
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7383; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147383 - 10 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 892
Abstract
The rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has put significant pressure on junior nursing staff. The objective of this study was to examine the in-depth experiences of junior nurses in providing care for COVID-19 patients within an acute care setting. This study [...] Read more.
The rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has put significant pressure on junior nursing staff. The objective of this study was to examine the in-depth experiences of junior nurses in providing care for COVID-19 patients within an acute care setting. This study employed a phenomenological method to understand the situation from a first-person perspective. Purposive sampling was used. Interviews were performed with 40 junior nurses (<4 years of clinical experience) who provided direct care to COVID-19 patients in isolation wards in acute care settings in Hong Kong. The interviews were conducted from 1 January 2021 to 24 May 2021 via virtual conferencing software (Zoom) to maintain social distancing, and the responses were analysed using Colaizzi’s seven-step method. Junior nurses’ psychological experiences of providing direct care to COVID-19 patients were categorised into four main themes. First, there were hurdles in the early stages, in which participants experienced negative emotions, such as fear, anxiety, helplessness, and fatigue. Somatic symptoms, such as headaches and sleep disturbance, were reported. Second, the adoption of self-care coping strategies enabled nurses to confront the hurdles, signifying the start of self-transformation. Third, junior nurses maintained positivity under pressure by appreciating their sources of support (including their families and other important relationships in their lives). Professionalism was also found to reinforce positivity. Fourth, self-transformation resulted in psychological growth, which prepared junior nurses to be resilient and confident in their clinical practice to take up future challenges in the ongoing battle against the pandemic. The hurdles experienced by junior nurses at the early stage of their work in isolation wards provided the foundation upon which self-transformation took place. Being able to employ self-care coping strategies and further sustain positivity characterised the self-transformation process. Eventually, junior nurses became resilient and more capable of understanding both the negativity and positivity of their experiences. The self-transformation process also enabled junior nurses to recognise and appreciate the wider support system from various parties in society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
Article
Relational Capital and Post-Traumatic Growth: The Role of Work Meaning
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7362; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147362 - 09 Jul 2021
Viewed by 593
Abstract
Through a statistical survey of 760 front-line medical staff during the COVID-19 epidemic, this study attempts to explore the relationships between relational capital, psychological security, post-traumatic growth and the meaning of work. Data analysis verifies that trust, reciprocity, and identification can promote post-traumatic [...] Read more.
Through a statistical survey of 760 front-line medical staff during the COVID-19 epidemic, this study attempts to explore the relationships between relational capital, psychological security, post-traumatic growth and the meaning of work. Data analysis verifies that trust, reciprocity, and identification can promote post-traumatic growth by enhancing the individual’s psychological security. A high level of work meaning can enhance the role of trust, reciprocity and identification in promoting psychological security. Work meaning has a moderated mediating effect when trust and reciprocity affect post-traumatic growth through psychological security, but no moderated mediating effect is found when identification affects post-traumatic growth through psychological security. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
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Article
Nurses Who Are More Willing to Participate in the Fight against COVID-19: Evidence from China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7357; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147357 - 09 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 894
Abstract
When facing an infectious disease disaster, nurses’ willingness to work is critical. Nurses’ lack of willingness to work during a pandemic may worsen the shortage of health care personnel. The purpose of this study is to assess the willingness of nurses to participate [...] Read more.
When facing an infectious disease disaster, nurses’ willingness to work is critical. Nurses’ lack of willingness to work during a pandemic may worsen the shortage of health care personnel. The purpose of this study is to assess the willingness of nurses to participate in the fight against COVID-19 in China and to identify factors associated therewith. This cross-sectional study examines nurses working in 11 Chinese cities including Macau, Hong Kong, Shenzhen, Dongguan, Huizhou, Guangzhou, Zhaoqing, Foshan, Jiangmen, Zhongshan, and Zhuhai. Questionnaires were collected from 19 May to 7 August 2020. A total of 8065 questionnaires were received, of which 8030 valid questionnaires were included for analysis. A total of 53.4% of participants reported that they had signed up to support the COVID-19 pandemic response. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that being single (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.60–0.87), having no children (OR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.68–0.97), possessing higher professional qualifications (OR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.14–1.37), having a more prestigious professional title (OR = 1.68, 95%CI: 1.50–1.90), being an administrative supervisor (OR = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.45–0.63), having a higher caring dimensions inventory score (OR = 1.01, 95% CI: 1.01–1.01), working in a hospital (OR = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.39–0.72), and receiving employer-provided care training (OR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.68–0.87) were predictive of nurses’ willingness to participate in the fight against COVID-19. We suggest that unmarried nurses should be given priority when recruiting to fight an epidemic and, for married nurses with children who are recruited to fight an epidemic, supporting measures should be provided for childcare. We suggest strengthening workplace training of caring for nurses in order to better retain and recruit qualified support for an epidemic outbreak of infectious diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
Article
To Volunteer or Not? Perspectives towards Pre-Registered Nursing Students Volunteering Frontline during COVID-19 Pandemic to Ease Healthcare Workforce: A Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6668; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126668 - 21 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 998
Abstract
COVID-19 has caused a shortage of healthcare workers and has strained healthcare systems globally. Pre-registered healthcare students with training have a duty of care and can support the healthcare workforce. This study explored factors influencing the willingness of final-year nursing students to volunteer [...] Read more.
COVID-19 has caused a shortage of healthcare workers and has strained healthcare systems globally. Pre-registered healthcare students with training have a duty of care and can support the healthcare workforce. This study explored factors influencing the willingness of final-year nursing students to volunteer during the COVID-19 pandemic, the role of professional identity in volunteering as healthcare workers, and strategies to improve future volunteering uptakes and processes. A qualitative study using focus-group discussions was conducted. Final-year nursing students who volunteered, students who did not volunteer, and lecturers who supervised student volunteers were recruited. Interviews were conducted online, video-recorded, and transcribed verbatim. A thematic analysis was used. The themes were “wavering thoughts on volunteering”, “bringing out ‘the nurse’ in students through volunteering” and “gearing up to volunteer”. Findings suggested the need to look beyond the simplicity of altruism to the role of professional identity, operational, and motivational factors to explain nursing students’ decision to volunteer and their volunteer behavior. Providing accommodation, monetary and academic-related incentives, supporting the transitionary phase from students to “professional volunteers”, promoting cohesive and positive staff–student volunteer relationships, and establishing a volunteer management team are strategies identified to improve volunteering uptake and operational processes. Our findings advocate strategic partnerships between hospitals/communities and academic institutions in providing various healthcare services during pandemics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
Article
Evaluation of the Risk of Anxiety and/or Depression during Confinement Due to COVID-19 in Central Spain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5732; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115732 - 27 May 2021
Viewed by 1365
Abstract
(1) Background: The confinement of the population in response to the COVID-19 pandemic was related to an increased risk of suffering from anxiety and/or depression in previous studies with other populations. (2) Methods: descriptive study using surveys (Goldberg Anxiety and Depression Scale) with [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The confinement of the population in response to the COVID-19 pandemic was related to an increased risk of suffering from anxiety and/or depression in previous studies with other populations. (2) Methods: descriptive study using surveys (Goldberg Anxiety and Depression Scale) with 808 participants over 18 years of age between 14 and 20 of May 2020 during the confinement due to the SARS-CoV-2 virus in Spain. (3) Results: 63% of the participants were at risk of suffering from anxiety and 64.9% were at risk of depression. Variables reaching statistical significance were: age (t anxiety = −0.139 and t depression = −0.153), gender (t anxiety = −4.152 and t depression = −4.178), marital status (anxiety F = 2.893 and depression F = 3.011), symptoms compatible with COVID-19 (t anxiety = −4.177 and t depression = −3.791), previous need for psychological help (t anxiety = −5.385 and t depression = −7.136) and need for such help at the time of the study (t anxiety = −9.144 and depression = −10.995). In addition, we generated two regression models that estimate the risk of anxiety and depression. (4) Conclusions: more than half of the participants were at risk of suffering from anxiety and/or depression, confirming the negative effect of confinement on the population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and COVID-19)
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