Special Issue "Nursing and Palliative Care"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Gianluca Catania
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via Pastore, 16132 Genoa, Italy
2. Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, PA 19104, USA
Interests: palliative and hospice care; quality of life; outcome measurement; complex intervention; quality and safety
Prof. Dr. George Demiris
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
Interests: palliative and hospice care; information technology; family caregiving

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Globally, as many as 100 million people are in need of, and may benefit from, palliative and hospice care across their disease trajectory and at the end of life. The landscape of healthcare keeps changing, chronic illnesses and disabilities are significantly increasing, and healthcare workforce shortage, costs, as well as quality and safety issues are driving forces that impact patient outcomes, their families and nursing care. Nurses’ responsibilities and duties to provide high-quality palliative care are internationally grounded in nurses’ codes of ethics. This contributes to their recognized role in delivering holistic patient- and family-centered care. Besides this, technological innovations are now rapidly spreading and may promote advancements in nursing care and address palliative and hospice care research priorities identified by nursing associations and research agencies. In recent years, nurses have made significant contributions to palliative and hospice care for patients and their families. They are in pivotal positions that enable them to lead change towards implementing nursing interventions aimed at improving the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of palliative care needs across diagnoses, disease trajectories, contexts of care, and models of nursing care. 

However, relevant palliative and hospice nursing research approaches and interventions need to be shared to stimulate a better high-quality, evidence-based palliative care practice. 

This Special Issue addresses the current state of knowledge on palliative and hospice nursing care. Papers dealing with nursing strategies with a view toward nursing aspects of quality and safety, assessment, nursing diagnosis, and interventions are welcome.

Original research papers, reviews, case reports, methodological papers, position papers, brief reports, and commentaries are accepted.

  • Overcoming barriers in underserved, hard-to-reach populations;
  • Implementing culturally congruent, patient- and caregiver-centered palliative care strategies;
  • Interventions to address patient and caregiver goals;
  • Symptom burden impact on individual and family goals;
  • Models for community-based palliative care;
  • Strategies for assessing caregiver preparedness and self-care;
  • Symptom management at end of life;
  • Electronic data collection methods used by health care providers to monitor, evaluate, and improve palliative and end-of-life care;
  • Best ways to measure patient-reported outcomes;
  • Effective ways to motivate and engage individuals, caregivers, and families in conversations about end-of-life goals and values that inform decision making;
  • Operationalizing and individualizing palliative care and which models best meet the supportive and end-of-life care needs of patients and families;
  • Factors in palliative care that impact the bereavement process.

Dr. Gianluca Catania
Prof. George Demiris
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • palliative care
  • hospice care
  • end-of-life care
  • decision making
  • symptom management
  • patient- and family-centered care
  • patient-reported outcomes
  • end-of-life conversations
  • patients’ needs
  • nursing care
  • quality and safety

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
We Want More Than Life-Sustaining Treatment during End-of-Life Care: Focus-Group Interviews
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4415; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094415 - 21 Apr 2021
Viewed by 616
Abstract
We qualitatively investigated end-of-life care needs. Data were collected via focus-group interviews with three groups: young adults, middle-aged adults, and older adults. The key question was, “What kind of care would you like to receive at the end of life?” Interview data were [...] Read more.
We qualitatively investigated end-of-life care needs. Data were collected via focus-group interviews with three groups: young adults, middle-aged adults, and older adults. The key question was, “What kind of care would you like to receive at the end of life?” Interview data were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. End-of-life care needs were classified into six categories: life-sustaining treatment needs, physical care needs, emotional care needs, environmental needs, needs for respect, and needs for preparation for death. Because the Korean culture is family-oriented and talking about death is taboo, Korean patients at the end of their life do not make decisions about life-sustaining treatment or actively prepare for death. Therefore, to provide proper end-of-life care, conversations and shared decision-making among patients and their families are crucial. Further, we must respect patients’ dignity and help them achieve a good death by understanding patients’ basic care preferences. Future research should continue examining end-of-life care needs that reflect the social and cultural context of Korea to inform instrument development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and Palliative Care)
Article
Impact of Palliative Care in Evaluating and Relieving Symptoms in Patients with Advanced Cancer. Results from the DEMETRA Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8429; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17228429 - 14 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 601
Abstract
Background: Cancer patients experience multiple symptoms throughout the course of the disease. We aimed to provide a comprehensive analysis of the symptom burden in patients with advanced cancer at admission to specialist palliative care (PC) services and seven days later to estimate the [...] Read more.
Background: Cancer patients experience multiple symptoms throughout the course of the disease. We aimed to provide a comprehensive analysis of the symptom burden in patients with advanced cancer at admission to specialist palliative care (PC) services and seven days later to estimate the immediate impact of PC intervention. Patient and methods: The analysis was based on an observational, prospective, multicenter study (named DEMETRA) conducted in Italy on new patients accessing network specialist PC centers during the period May 2017–November 2017. The prevalence and intensity of symptoms were assessed at baseline and after seven days using three tools including the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS). Results: Five PC centers recruited 865 cancer patients. Thirty-three different symptoms were observed at the baseline, the most frequent being asthenia (84.9%) and poor well-being (71%). The intensity of the most frequent symptoms according to ESAS ranged from 5.5 for asthenia to 3.9 for nausea. The presence and intensity of physical symptoms increased with increasing levels of anxiety and depression. After seven days, prevalence of nausea and breathlessness as well as intensity of almost all symptoms significantly decreased. Conclusions: The study confirmed the considerable symptom burden of patients with advanced cancer. PC intervention has significantly reduced the severity of symptoms, despite the patients’ advanced disease and short survival. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and Palliative Care)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Effect of Practice toward Do-Not-Resuscitate among Taiwanese Nursing Staff Using Path Modeling
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6350; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17176350 - 31 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 777
Abstract
This study aimed to elucidate the predictors and the effects of path modeling on the knowledge, attitude, and practice toward do-not-resuscitate (DNR) among the Taiwanese nursing staff. This study was a cross-sectional, descriptive design using stratified cluster sampling. We collected data on demographics, [...] Read more.
This study aimed to elucidate the predictors and the effects of path modeling on the knowledge, attitude, and practice toward do-not-resuscitate (DNR) among the Taiwanese nursing staff. This study was a cross-sectional, descriptive design using stratified cluster sampling. We collected data on demographics, knowledge, attitude, and practice as measured by the DNR inventory (KAP-DNR), Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale, and Dispositional Resilience Scale. Participants were 194 nursing staff from a medical center in northern Taiwan in 2019. The results showed that participation in DNR signature and education related to palliative care were significant positive predictors of knowledge toward DNR. The DNR predictors toward attitude included DNR knowledge, mindfulness, self-efficacy, dispositional resilience, and religious belief of nurses. Generally, the critical predictors of DNR practice were DNR attitude, dispositional resilience, and male nurses. In path modeling, we identified that self-efficacy, dispositional resilience, master’s degree, and religious belief directly influenced practice constituting DNR. Based on the findings of this study, we propose that nurses should improve their self-efficacy and dispositional resilience through training programs. Encouraging staff to undertake further education and have religious beliefs can enhance the practice of DNR and provide better end-of-life care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and Palliative Care)
Article
Exploring Advance Directive Perspectives and Associations with Preferences for End-of-Life Life-Sustaining Treatments among Patients with Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4257; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17124257 - 15 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 746
Abstract
Deactivation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is a critical issue in the advance care planning (ACP) of ICD recipients; however, related perspectives have rarely been explored. Thus, this study aimed to provide an initial investigation of ICD recipients’ perceived susceptibility and barriers/benefits regarding [...] Read more.
Deactivation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is a critical issue in the advance care planning (ACP) of ICD recipients; however, related perspectives have rarely been explored. Thus, this study aimed to provide an initial investigation of ICD recipients’ perceived susceptibility and barriers/benefits regarding ACP and/or advance directives (ADs), and associations of these modifiable factors with preferences for end-of-life life-sustaining treatments (LSTs) (cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), ventilator support, hemodialysis, and hospice care). Using a descriptive correlational design, 48 ICD recipients (age, 50.1 years; male, 85.4%) completed survey questionnaires. “No burden on family” was the most highly valued (59.1%), followed by “comfortable death” (20.4%), and both (11.4%). LST preference was 43.8% for ventilator support, 45.8% for both hemodialysis and hospice care, and 54.2% for CPR. Perceived susceptibility to having unexpected end-of-life experiences increased the likelihood of preference for aggressive LSTs, with preferences increasing by 15% for CPR, 17% for ventilator support, and 23% for hemodialysis. A non-modifiable factor, older age, was the only predictor of increased preference for hospice care (odds ratio = 1.09, p = 0.016). Among the modifiable factors, a higher perceived susceptibility increased the likelihood of aggressive LST preferences. The findings imply that to facilitate informed decisions for LSTs, early ACP discussion could be helpful and enhance these modifiable factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and Palliative Care)
Article
Nursing Students’ Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Medical Marijuana: A Descriptive Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2492; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072492 - 06 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1271
Abstract
Marijuana use for medical purposes dates back to ancient times. Despite its high therapeutic potential, its adverse effects have raised important legal restrictions. However, this situation in Spain may soon undergo significant changes, without anyone so far having studied the knowledge and/or the [...] Read more.
Marijuana use for medical purposes dates back to ancient times. Despite its high therapeutic potential, its adverse effects have raised important legal restrictions. However, this situation in Spain may soon undergo significant changes, without anyone so far having studied the knowledge and/or the level of acceptance of medical marijuana by future healthcare professionals. The aim of the present study was to determine nursing students’ knowledge of and attitudes towards medical marijuana. A cross-sectional design was used. A total of 578 nursing students from the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain), ≥18 years old and of both sexes, were invited to complete the Spanish version of the questionnaire “Medical Marijuana” between January and May 2019. A total of 364 students decided to participate in the study. More than 75% of the students agreed with the legalization of medical marijuana, although their knowledge and confidence levels regarding efficacy, safety and drug interactions of medical marijuana were low. Nursing students showed a clear lack of knowledge about medical marijuana and thus, in light of possible regulatory changes, it would be necessary to strengthen the training of nurses with respect to medical marijuana in order to make responsible use of it. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and Palliative Care)
Back to TopTop