Special Issue "Occupational Exposure to Psychosocial Factors in Nursing Profession"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Silvia Portero de la Cruz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, University of Córdoba, 14071 Córdoba, Spain
Interests: public health; cccupational health; epidemiology
Prof. Dr. Jesús Cebrino Cruz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Seville, 41009 Seville, Spain
Interests: bibliometrics; epidemiology; psychological testing; public health
Dr. Manuel Vaquero Abellán
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, University of Córdoba, Avda. Menéndez Pidal s/n, Córdoba 14071, Spain
Interests: public health; occupational medicine; epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the Special Issue on “Occupational Exposure to Psychosocial Factors in Nursing Profession”, which we are editing in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

As a consequence of the changes in organizations and of the current globalization processes, the exposure to psychosocial factors in the professional sphere has been more frequent and intense. When these are adverse to the development of the professional activity and the individual's quality of life, they turn into a higher level of stress, burnout, health disorders, and mental symptoms among healthcare professionals. In particular, in the last two decades, there has been a growing concern with the effects of psychosocial factors on nursing professionals, which represent the most numerous group of health professionals who deliver care to patients 24 hours per day.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to publish original, high-quality research papers as well as review articles addressing recent advances in psychosocial factors prevention in the workplace and the promotion of nurses’ mental health and well-being. We particularly welcome papers on policy impact, studies with strong implications for practice, and researchers from different theoretical and methodological perspectives in order to advance knowledge and practice in the field of psychosocial factors.

Dr. Silvia Portero de la Cruz
Prof. Dr. Jesús Cebrino Cruz
Dr. Manuel Vaquero Abellán
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • occupational health
  • psychosocial risks
  • working conditions
  • nursing Staff

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Capturing Interactive Work for Nurses—First Validation of the German IWDS-N as a Multidimensional Measure
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7786; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157786 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 267
Abstract
The theoretical framework of interactive work provides a multi-dimensional perspective on the interpersonal demands of nurses in nurse–patient interactions. It is defined by four dimensions: emotional labor directed to the self and others, cooperative work, and subjective acting. While the framework stems from [...] Read more.
The theoretical framework of interactive work provides a multi-dimensional perspective on the interpersonal demands of nurses in nurse–patient interactions. It is defined by four dimensions: emotional labor directed to the self and others, cooperative work, and subjective acting. While the framework stems from qualitative research, the aim of the current study is to translate it into a quantitative scale to enable measurement of the high interpersonal demands that so often remain implicit. For this reason, we conducted an online survey study (N = 157; 130 women, 25 men, 2 divers) among professional nurses in Germany (spring 2021) to test the derived items and subscales concerning interactive work, which resulted in a 4-factor model that was verified with confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The survey further captured additional information on established constructs concerning job-related well-being (e.g., burn out, meaningfulness), job characteristics (e.g., work interruptions, time pressure) and individual resources (coping strategies) that are supposed to correlate with interactive work demand scales for nurses (IWDS-N), to determine the quantitative nature of their relations. The results show that the subscales of the IWDS-N have adverse effects on indicators of work-related well-being. Moreover, negative job characteristics, such as time pressure, are positively correlated with subscales of the IWDS-N and are therefore problem-focused coping strategies as an individual resource. The results emphasize that a multidimensional consideration of self-regulatory processes is useful to capture the subtle and complex nature of the interactive work demands of nurses. The current study is the first that developed a quantitative, multi-dimensional measure for interactive work demands, which can help make implicit demands in service work explicit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Exposure to Psychosocial Factors in Nursing Profession)
Article
Job Insecurity in Nursing: A Bibliometric Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 663; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020663 - 14 Jan 2021
Viewed by 938
Abstract
Nurses are a key workforce in the international health system, and as such maintaining optimal working conditions is critical for preserving their well-being and good performance. One of the psychosocial risks that can have a major impact on them is job insecurity. This [...] Read more.
Nurses are a key workforce in the international health system, and as such maintaining optimal working conditions is critical for preserving their well-being and good performance. One of the psychosocial risks that can have a major impact on them is job insecurity. This study aimed to carry out a bibliometric analysis, mapping job insecurity in 128 articles in nursing, and to determine the most important findings in the literature. The search was conducted in the Web of Science Core Collection database using the Science Citation Index (SCI)-Expanded and Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) indexes on 6 March 2020. This field of discipline has recently been established and has experienced significant growth since 2013. The most productive and widely cited authors are Denton and Zeytinoglu. The most productive universities are Toronto University, McMaster University, and Monash University. The most productive countries are the United States, Canada, Australia, Finland, and the United Kingdom. The most widely used measure was Karasek’s Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). The main findings report negative correlations with job satisfaction, mental well-being, and physical health. Job insecurity is a recent and little-discussed topic, and this paper provides an overview of the field. This will enable policies to reduce psychosocial risks among nurses to be implemented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Exposure to Psychosocial Factors in Nursing Profession)
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