Special Issue "Health Effects of Occupational and Environmental Exposure"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Raquel Alarcón
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing Science, Physiotherapy and Medicine, University of Almeria, 04120 Almeria, Spain
Interests: exposure pesticides; endocrine diysruptors;, occupational health; exposure biomarkers; toxicology; public health
Prof. Dr. Maria del Mar Requena Mullor
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing Science, Physiotherapy and Medicine, University of Almeria, 04120 Almeria, Spain
Interests: occupational health; occupational epidemiology; occupational nursing; exposure biomarkers; toxicology; public health; pesticides

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the furthest reaches of human history, human beings have had to carry out a series of activities for their survival, many of them in the presence of significant risks to their safety and health. The evolution of work has seen the reduction of a large number of risks in the workplace and the appearance of new and emerging risks, which must be identified, evaluated, and controlled.

The health effects caused by occupational exposure are a cause for concern throughout the world, so it is important to analyze the relationships between work and health, identifying the risk factors that may cause disorders or damage to work health.

The study of the safety conditions and use of individual protective equipment (IPE), the exposure to biological and chemical agents chemical agents, as well as the repetitiveness and intensity of the tasks to be carried out (effort and postural risk, mental health, etc.), in order to achieve optimal worker welfare, are current issues and are of great interest at the public and occupational health levels. Studying the impacts of these risk factors could lead to a better understanding of the adverse effects on the health of the population as well as their medium and long term consequences.

We invite colleagues from all health disciplines to submit articles using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods approaches. The submitted articles should focus on presenting new contributions on the health effects of occupational and environmental exposures and on interventions to improve the health of professionals.

We thank you for considering this invitation and are available for any inquiries.

Prof. Dr. Raquel Alarcón
Prof. Dr. Maria del Mar Requena Mullor
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Prevalence and Predictors of Hypertension and the Metabolic Syndrome in Police Personnel
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6728; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136728 - 22 Jun 2021
Viewed by 540
Abstract
Hypertension and metabolic syndrome (METSYN) are reportedly high in police forces. This may contribute to health deterioration and absenteeism in police personnel. Police forces comprise of staff in ‘operational’ and ‘non-operational’ job types but it is not known if job type is associated [...] Read more.
Hypertension and metabolic syndrome (METSYN) are reportedly high in police forces. This may contribute to health deterioration and absenteeism in police personnel. Police forces comprise of staff in ‘operational’ and ‘non-operational’ job types but it is not known if job type is associated to hypertension and METSYN prevalence. This study aimed to explore the prevalence of hypertension and METSYN, the factors associated with the risk of hypertension and METSYN, and compare physiological, psychological, and behavioural factors between operational and non-operational police personnel. Cross-sectional data was collected from 77 operational and 60 non-operational police workers. Hypertension and METSYN were prevalent in 60.5% and 20% of operational and 60.0% and 13.6% of non-operational police personnel, respectively (p > 0.05). Operational job type, moderate organisational stress (compared with low stress) and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were associated with lower odds of hypertension, whereas increasing body mass index was associated with increased odds of hypertension (p < 0.05). None of the independent variables were significantly associated with the odds of METSYN. Operational police had several increased cardiometabolic risk markers compared with non-operational police. Given the high prevalence of hypertension and METSYN in operational and non-operational personnel, occupational health interventions are needed for the police and could be informed by the findings of this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Effects of Occupational and Environmental Exposure)
Article
Incidence and Related Factors of Infidelity among Medical Doctors and Nurses
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5575; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115575 - 23 May 2021
Viewed by 641
Abstract
Although there is a large body of research addressing infidelity, no study, to our knowledge, has specifically addressed infidelity in doctors and nurses and the correlation with work hours, schedule and other variables. This research aimed to know the incidence of and factors [...] Read more.
Although there is a large body of research addressing infidelity, no study, to our knowledge, has specifically addressed infidelity in doctors and nurses and the correlation with work hours, schedule and other variables. This research aimed to know the incidence of and factors related to infidelity among doctors and nurses. A descriptive study was carried out, studying the association of certain variables. In total, 367 volunteer participants completed an online survey. Of them, 21% either have or have had an unfaithful relationship. The majority (81.7%) were doctors. Men were 4.3 times more unfaithful than women, with these differences being statistically significant (OR = 4.37, p < 0.001). Of the participants involved in an unfaithful relationship within the work area, the majority were men. Likewise, those who reported having had sex in the doctor’s room on duty were also men, with these differences being statistically significant (OR = 12.81, p < 0.01). The night emergency schedule was 60% more frequent in unfaithful people, and these differences were statistically significant (OR = 12.43, p < 0.01). There is a significant rate of infidelity in doctors and nurses. Men are more likely to be unfaithful than women are, and people who work nighttime emergencies are more likely to be unfaithful. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Effects of Occupational and Environmental Exposure)
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