Special Issue "Agricultural Development and One Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Elizabeth VanWormer
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Guest Editor
School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences School of Natural Resources University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Dr. E. Wesley F. Peterson
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Economics University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Dr. Christopher R. Gustafson
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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Economics University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Special Issue Information

The Covid-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of understanding relationships among physical and mental health, the environment, and economic conditions. In addition to widespread hospitalizations and increased mortality, the virus has caused great economic damage as entire industries have been forced to lay off workers and close down giving rise to increases in depression and anxiety as well as economic hardships. Because of the nature of the work involved, agricultural sectors around the world have been particularly hard hit. In low- and moderate-income countries where agriculture is still the main economic activity, longstanding efforts to raise agricultural productivity, increase rural incomes, and assure national food security are likely to have been stalled by the pandemic. Human health is both a cause and an effect of agricultural development. Poor health slows agricultural development through its effects on worker productivity while stagnant agricultural development may affect nutrition and food security thereby jeopardizing human health. Agricultural development is also closely tied to the health of domestic animals, wildlife, and the environments that we share.

For this Special Issue, we invite submissions addressing diverse aspects of the interface between agricultural development and human, animal, and ecosystem health. An appropriate framework for this Special Issue is provided by the One Health approach described by the US Centers for Disease Control as “... a collaborative, multisectoral, and transdisciplinary approach—working at the local, regional, national, and global levels—with the goal of achieving optimal health outcomes recognizing the interconnection between people, animals, plants, and their shared environment.” All manuscripts will be peer-reviewed by experts in the field and are due no later than September 30, 2021.

Dr. Elizabeth VanWormer
Dr. E. Wesley F. Peterson
Dr. Christopher R. Gustafson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • One Health
  • agricultural development
  • global public health
  • economic development
  • food security
  • nutrition
  • agricultural productivity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Coping with Adversity: Resilience Dynamics of Livestock Farmers in Two Agroecological Zones of Ghana
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9008; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179008 - 26 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Despite the increasing occurrence of adverse events including droughts and conflicts, livestock farmers in Ghana continue to raise animals to support their livelihoods and the national economy. We assessed the resilience of cattle farmers (CF) to adverse events they faced using a cross-sectional [...] Read more.
Despite the increasing occurrence of adverse events including droughts and conflicts, livestock farmers in Ghana continue to raise animals to support their livelihoods and the national economy. We assessed the resilience of cattle farmers (CF) to adverse events they faced using a cross-sectional survey of 287 CF in two agroecological zones in Ghana. Resilience to adversities was assessed using the Resilience Scale (RS-14). Resilience scores and categories were computed and factors that explained variations in resilience categories assessed. The farmers kept, on average, 31 cattle per household, with a majority (91%) also growing crops. Key adverse events confronting them in both districts were animal disease outbreaks, pasture shortages, and theft, with 85% (240/287) losing, on average, seven cattle (15% of the herd size) over a one-year period. The mean resilience score was 71 (SD = 8) out of 98; 52% were highly resilient. Resilience was higher in the southern district (72 versus 70), albeit not statistically significant (p = 0.06). The resilience significantly improved with age, each unit increase in cattle in the herd, and having experience raising livestock (p < 0.001). The CF have relatively high resilience to adverse events affecting their productivity. The findings provide relevant information for implementing mitigation measures to improve production by reducing animal mortalities through high-quality veterinary services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Development and One Health)
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