Special Issue "Oral Health and Disease Prevention"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Chethan Sampath
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Meharry Medical College, School of Dentistry, Department of Oral Diagnostics & Research, Nashville, TN 37208, USA
Interests: periodontitis; oral biology & health; bioactive compounds; metabolic disease and oral hygiene

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral hygiene or oral health is the most neglected area of global health and research. The oral cavity harbors many bacterial populations and is suggested to be involved in several health complications. Poor oral health unknowingly increases the risk of many other health complications, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, chronic pulmonary disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and psoriasis. Despite the progress that has been made in understanding oral health, prevention, early diagnosis, and management remain a challenge.

In this Special Issue, we invite researchers to offer specific recommendations for dental patients, and oral health care professionals and policy makers who can share their thoughts on the best actions to improve the efficacy of oral health and disease prevention. 

Dr. Chethan Sampath
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Periodontitis
  • Oral health
  • Oral microbiome
  • Periodontal health education
  • Pathogenesis
  • Periodontal medicine
  • Public health
  • Epidemiology
  • Dental care

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Investigating the Antioxidant and Cytocompatibility of Mimusops elengi Linn Extract over Human Gingival Fibroblast Cells
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7162; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137162 - 04 Jul 2021
Viewed by 519
Abstract
Background—chlorhexidine (CHX) is most commonly used as a chemical plaque control agent. Nevertheless, its adverse effects, including teeth discoloration, taste alteration and calculus build-up, limit its use and divert us to medicinal herbs. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the phytochemical [...] Read more.
Background—chlorhexidine (CHX) is most commonly used as a chemical plaque control agent. Nevertheless, its adverse effects, including teeth discoloration, taste alteration and calculus build-up, limit its use and divert us to medicinal herbs. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the phytochemical composition, antioxidant potential, and cytotoxic effects of Mimusops elengi Linn extract (ME) over normal human cultured adult gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Methods—in vitro phytochemical screening, total flavonoid content, antioxidant potential by DPPH and Nitric Oxide (NO) radical scavenging activity, and cytotoxic effects of ME extracts over HGF were explored. The viability of HGF cells was determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), neutral red uptake, and trypan blue assay after treatment with different concentrations of CHX and ME (0.3125 to 10 µg/mL). ResultsME showed some alkaloids, glycosides, saponins and flavonoids exhibited relatively moderate-to-good antioxidant potential. Increasing the concentration of CHX and ME from 0.3125 to 10 µg/mL reduced cell viability from 29.71% to 1.07% and 96.12% to 56.02%, respectively. At higher concentrations, CHX reduced the viability of cells by 52.36-fold compared to ME, revealed by MTT assay. At 10 µg/mL concentration, the mean cell viability of CHX and ME-treated cells was 2.24% and 57.45%, respectively, revealed by a neutral red assay. The viability of CHX- and ME-treated HGF cells estimated at higher concentrations (10 µg/mL) using trypan blue assay was found to be 2.18% and 47.36%, respectively. A paired t-test showed significance (p < 0.05), and one-way ANOVA difference between the mean cell viability of CHX- and ME-treated cells at different concentrations. One-way ANOVA confirmed the significant difference between the viability of CHX- and ME-treated cells. Conclusions—The cytoprotective and antioxidant effects of ME emphasize its potential benefits. Therefore, it could emerge as a herbal alternative and adjunct to conventional oral hygiene methods, that can diminish periodontal tissue destruction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health and Disease Prevention)
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Article
Measuring the Level of Medical-Emergency-Related Knowledge among Senior Dental Students and Clinical Trainers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6889; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136889 - 27 Jun 2021
Viewed by 458
Abstract
Objectives: This study aimed to measure the level of medical-emergency-related knowledge among senior dental students and clinical trainers in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional pilot survey was conducted at Taibah Dental College, Madina, Saudi Arabia between March 2017 and November 2018. Two hundred [...] Read more.
Objectives: This study aimed to measure the level of medical-emergency-related knowledge among senior dental students and clinical trainers in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional pilot survey was conducted at Taibah Dental College, Madina, Saudi Arabia between March 2017 and November 2018. Two hundred and seventy-five self-administered anonymous questionnaires on the management of common medical emergencies were distributed to all senior dental students and clinical trainers at Taibah Dental College. Results: There was a serious lack of knowledge regarding the management of medical emergency scenarios among the participants. Only 54% of participants knew the correct management for some frequent and life-threating conditions such as “crushed chest pain”, and only 30–35% of participants knew the correct management of deeply sedated patients with benzodiazepine overdose and crisis of hypoadrenalism. Moderate-quality knowledge (50–74% of participants responded correctly) was noted for the following conditions: sudden onset of brain stroke, psychiatric patient, unconscious patient with hypoglycemia, patient with postural hypotension, and patient with hyperventilation. Based on the scale of knowledge, there were significant differences in the level of knowledge between clinical trainers, senior dental students, and junior dental students (p ≤ 0.01). Almost all students and 90% of trainers declared the need for further training. Conclusions: The overall knowledge regarding the management of medical emergency crises in the dental chair was moderate. However, the scale of knowledge regarding the management of medical emergency crises has gradually increased with the number of years of experience. Most participants recognize the need for further training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health and Disease Prevention)
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