Special Issue "The Impact of Physical Activity on the Health of Women among Different Ages"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Women's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Anna Polak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Jerzy Kukuczka Academy of Physical Education in Katowice, 72A Mikołowska str., 40-065 Katowice, Poland
Interests: physical therapy in the elderly and geriatric; oncological physiotherapy in women; prevention and treatment of chronic wounds; physical factors in the treatment of wounds
Prof. Dr. Bogdan Bacik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Jerzy Kukuczka Academy of Physical Education in Katowice, 72A Mikołows ka str., 40-065 Katowice, Poland
Interests: biomechanics; movement analysis; objectivization of the effects of therapy
Dr. Agnieszka Nawrat-Szoltysik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Jerzy Kukuczka Academy of Physical Education in Katowice, 72A Mikołowska str., 40-065 Katowice, Poland
Interests: physical therapy in the elderly and geriatric; prevention and treatment of osteoporosis; dementia; gait disorders and posture control in the elderly

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many scientific studies confirm the positive effect of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of various diseases. Many of these conditions affect women of all ages, including oncological diseases (mainly breast cancer), urinary incontinence, osteoporosis, and metabolic and cardiovascular diseases (including diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and chronic heart failure). Women also struggle with diseases typical of advanced age, such as dementia, disturbances in gait and body balance, and an increased risk of falls and related injuries.

Physical activity positively modulates biological mechanisms that are risk factors for many diseases. As a result of physical activity, body weight and blood estrogen concentration decrease, while the blood concentration of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) increases. Physical activity stimulates the synthesis of adiponectin, which improves glucose metabolism, increases insulin sensitivity, and stimulates the metabolism of fatty acids in the liver and muscles. Exercise training lowers blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), leading to an increase in IGF-binding proteins 1 and 3 (IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3). Research shows that physical activity inhibits the synthesis of C-reactive protein (CRP) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6), while increasing the synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-1), which reduces the severity of chronic inflammation. Physical training also reduces the concentration of F2-isoprostanes and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OhdG) in the blood and stimulates the formation of mitochondria in the muscles, which reduces oxidative stress and the formation of free radicals.

Physical activity reduces not only the health but also the social effects of many diseases. Clinical trials confirm the positive effect of physical training in reducing anxiety and depression as well as chronic fatigue in women treated for breast cancer. Clinical studies also confirm the positive effect of physical activity on improving the quality of life of women with various diseases, including those typical of oncological diseases and advanced age.

The subject of this Special Issue will include issues related to the role of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of various diseases in women, including:

  • Physical activity and oncological diseases in women.
  • Physical activity and gynecological diseases in women.
  • The impact of obesity on women’s health.
  • The role of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in pre- and postmenopausal women.
  • The role of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of urinary incontinence in pre- and postmenopausal women.
  • Physical activity in the prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases in women.
  • The role of physical activity in preventing dementia in women.
  • Physical activity in the treatment of posture and gait control disorders in women in advanced age.
  • The role of physical activity in reducing the fear of falling and preventing falls in elderly women.

Prof. Dr. Anna Polak
Dr. Agnieszka Nawrat-Szoltysik
Prof. Dr. Bogdan Bacik
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • woman health
  • oncology
  • obesity
  • incontinence
  • metabolic diseases
  • posture control
  • risk of falls
  • osteoporosis

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of 16 Weeks of Taekwondo Training on the Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity, Circulating Neurotransmitters, and Subjective Well-Being of Obese Postmenopausal Women
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10789; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182010789 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 378
Abstract
We investigated the effects of Taekwondo training on the body composition, serum lipid profiles, plasma neurotransmitter levels, cerebral blood flow velocities, and subjective well-being of 24 obese postmenopausal women. The women were randomly assigned into the experimental (n = 12) and control [...] Read more.
We investigated the effects of Taekwondo training on the body composition, serum lipid profiles, plasma neurotransmitter levels, cerebral blood flow velocities, and subjective well-being of 24 obese postmenopausal women. The women were randomly assigned into the experimental (n = 12) and control (n = 12) groups. The experimental group underwent Taekwondo training five times per week for 16 weeks, while the control group did not. All participants underwent evaluation for the following parameters before and after the intervention: body composition; serum lipid profiles; plasma serotonin and dopamine levels; cerebral blood flow velocities; positive and negative affect schedule (PANAS) scores; satisfaction with life scale (SWLS) scores. After the intervention, it was observed that the weight, body mass index, body fat percentage, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and PANAS-NA (negative affect in the PANAS questionnaire) scores were significantly decreased (p < 0.05)—while the plasma serotonin levels were significantly increased (p < 0.05)—in the experimental group. Conversely, there were no significant changes in the cerebral blood flow velocities (p > 0.05). Taekwondo training can be effective in not only reducing obesity, but also in increasing the circulating neurotransmitters and enhancing the subjective well-being of obese postmenopausal women. Full article
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Article
Can Exercise Help Regulate Blood Pressure and Improve Functional Capacity of Older Women with Hypertension against the Deleterious Effects of Physical Inactivity?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9117; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179117 - 29 Aug 2021
Viewed by 807
Abstract
Background: Sedentarism and inactivity are risk factors for the development of hypertension. Thus, the prevention of the natural process of biological and physiological aging of older women through physical exercise results in higher benefits in preventing cardiovascular diseases and can be a key [...] Read more.
Background: Sedentarism and inactivity are risk factors for the development of hypertension. Thus, the prevention of the natural process of biological and physiological aging of older women through physical exercise results in higher benefits in preventing cardiovascular diseases and can be a key factor for its treatment. Multicomponent exercise (METP) is a training method that may help older women with hypertension by improving their quality of life and their response to treatment. Methods: Twenty-eight older Caucasian women with hypertension (66.7 ± 5.3 years, 1.59 ± 0.11 m) performed a supervised METP program of nine months followed by three months of detraining (DT), and seventeen older women (68.2 ± 4.7 years, 1.57 ± 0.16 cm) with hypertension maintained their daily routine, without exercise. Blood pressure (BP), resting heart rate, and functional capacity (FC) were evaluated at the beginning and at the end of the program, and after three months of DT. Results: The ME program improved (p < 0.05) systolic BP (−5.37%), diastolic BP (−5.67%), resting heart rate (−7.8%), agility (9.8%), lower body strength (27.8%), upper body strength (10.0%), and cardiorespiratory capacity (8.6%). BP and FC deteriorated after the DT period (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Nine months of multicomponent exercise were sufficient to improve functional capacity and promote benefits in blood pressure, although was not sufficient to allow BP to reach the normal values of older women. The three month DT period without exercise caused the reversal of BP improvements but maintained the functional capacity of older women. Full article
Article
The Effects of the Pilates Method on Pelvic Floor Injuries during Pregnancy and Childbirth: A Quasi-Experimental Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6995; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136995 - 30 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1008
Abstract
The perineal injuries suffered during childbirth have a great impact on the quality of life of the female population. Evidence suggests that the Pilates method is used by pregnant women to improve the physical and psychological outcomes of pregnancy. The aim of this [...] Read more.
The perineal injuries suffered during childbirth have a great impact on the quality of life of the female population. Evidence suggests that the Pilates method is used by pregnant women to improve the physical and psychological outcomes of pregnancy. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the Pilates Method during pregnancy on the incidence and degree of intrapartum perineal trauma. A quasi-experimental study was carried out between November 2018 and December 2019 at different health centers in two health districts. Participants were 72 pregnant women attending the antenatal program, who were assigned to a Pilates group or a control group (48 and 24 pregnant women, respectively). The main outcome measurement was perineal trauma during childbirth. After participating in the Pilates program, the women in the experimental group were significantly less likely to suffer perineal trauma in spontaneous deliveries compared to the women in the control group. After evaluating these results, it is concluded that health center managers should promote the training of midwives in the prevention and treatment of pelvic floor injuries during pregnancy and should consider strategies to enhance adhesion and participation with respect to pelvic floor exercise programs throughout pregnancy by means of Apps and other digital media specifically aimed at this phase. Full article
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Article
Translation and Validation of the Arabic Version of the Capability Assessment for Diet and Activity (CADA) Questionnaire in Saudi University Employed Women
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6246; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126246 - 09 Jun 2021
Viewed by 931
Abstract
Background: The Capability Assessment for Diet and Activity (CADA) is a questionnaire that was developed in English and designed to measure the practical barriers and opportunities for diet and physical activity. Objective: This study aimed to translate, culturally adapt, and validate the CADA [...] Read more.
Background: The Capability Assessment for Diet and Activity (CADA) is a questionnaire that was developed in English and designed to measure the practical barriers and opportunities for diet and physical activity. Objective: This study aimed to translate, culturally adapt, and validate the CADA questionnaire for the Arabic context in a sample of Saudi women employed at a university. Methods: The CADA was translated into Arabic using the forward and backward translation process. The Arabic version was then validated with a sample of 125 female Saudi participants. In order to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Arabic version, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was assessed, and a principal component analysis was performed. Results: The translated CADA had good psychometric quality. The content validity analysis revealed a representativeness score of 99.3% and a degree of clarity of 98.6%, indicating excellent compatibility. The principal component analysis showed a single-factor structure. Conclusions: The Arabic version of the CADA questionnaire is now available to assess opportunities to achieve a healthy diet and physical activity level as part of health behavior management, which can lead to more effective interventions for improving people’s health in Arabic-speaking countries. Full article
Article
Effects of Different Types of Physical Activity on Health-Related Quality-of-Life in Korean Women with Depressive Disorder
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4639; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18094639 - 27 Apr 2021
Viewed by 718
Abstract
Depressive disorder is a frequent psychological illness and causes community health problems for many women. It was found that the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) score of many women was altered due to mental and physical problems. Physical activity (PA) might effectively improve [...] Read more.
Depressive disorder is a frequent psychological illness and causes community health problems for many women. It was found that the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) score of many women was altered due to mental and physical problems. Physical activity (PA) might effectively improve the responses of the HRQoL of women with depressive disorder. Therefore, the study aimed to identify the effects of different types of PA (e.g., walking, strength exercise, flexibility exercise) on the responses of the HRQoL of Korean women with depressive disorder. A sample of 1315 Korean women aged 19 or older with a depressive disorder was accumulated. The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) and Euro Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D index score) were used. The characteristics of the participants were analyzed by the complex sample in frequency analysis. Furthermore, the complex sample general linear model was used to determine the effects of different types of PA on the HRQoL of Korean women with depressive disorder. In the results, there was a statistically significant difference between the groups who participated for one to two days, who participated for three to four days, and who did not participate in walking at all. In the flexibility exercise, there was a statistically significant difference in the group who participated for three to four days from the group who did not participate at all. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the strength exercise. In conclusion, the walking and flexibility exercises were effective physical activities (PAs) to improve the responses to the HRQoL of Korean women with depressive disorder. Full article
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