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Special Issue "Physical Activity and Health Promotion: Trends, Strategies, and Innovations"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Emma George
E-Mail Website
Leading Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia
Interests: physical activity; health promotion; men’s health; community engagement; professional sport
Dr. Justin Guagliano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia
Interests: physical activity and health promotion in children and youth
Dr. Freya MacMillan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia
Interests: health promotion; diabetes prevention; mixed methods; community-engaged research
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Participation in regular physical activity is associated with a range of health benefits, including reduced chronic disease risk, improved mental health outcomes, and improved quality of life. Despite known benefits, adults and young people are insufficiently physically active globally. Therefore, the World Health Organization included a goal of a 10% relative reduction in the prevalence of insufficient physical activity in their Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases 2013–2020. Progress towards this goal has been slow, and insufficient physical activity remains a global public health concern. There is an urgent need for innovative, sustainable, and translational physical activity and health promotion initiatives that empower individuals and communities to make positive lifestyle choices.

This Special Issue provides an interdisciplinary platform to showcase research exploring current trends in physical activity (and inactivity), factors influencing physical activity and sport participation, innovative health promotion interventions targeting physical activity, and reviews collating evidence on the nature and effectiveness of physical activity interventions across the lifecourse. We invite researchers from broad areas of physical activity and health promotion, using rigorous study designs to address these and related topics, to submit their work for this Special Issue.

Dr. Emma George
Dr. Justin Guagliano
Dr. Freya MacMillan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • Health promotion
  • Chronic disease
  • Population health
  • Health inequality
  • Global health
  • Social determinants of health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Feasibility Study Comparing Physical Activity Classifications from Accelerometers with Wearable Camera Data
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9323; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249323 - 13 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 890
Abstract
Device-based assessments are frequently used to measure physical activity (PA) but contextual measures are often lacking. There is a need for new methods, and one under-explored option is the use of wearable cameras. This study tested the use of wearable cameras in PA [...] Read more.
Device-based assessments are frequently used to measure physical activity (PA) but contextual measures are often lacking. There is a need for new methods, and one under-explored option is the use of wearable cameras. This study tested the use of wearable cameras in PA measurement by comparing intensity classifications from accelerometers with wearable camera data. Seventy-eight 18–30-year-olds wore an Actigraph GT9X link accelerometer and Autographer wearable camera for three consecutive days. An image coding schedule was designed to assess activity categories and activity sub-categories defined by the 2011 Compendium of Physical Activities (Compendium). Accelerometer hourly detailed files processed using the Montoye (2020) cut-points were linked to camera data using date and time stamps. Agreement was examined using equivalence testing, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Spearman’s correlation coefficient (rho). Fifty-three participants contributing 636 person-hours were included. Reliability was moderate to good for sedentary behavior (rho = 0.77), light intensity activities (rho = 0.59) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (rho = 0.51). The estimates of sedentary behavior, light activity and MVPA from the two methods were similar, but not equivalent. Wearable cameras are a potential complementary tool for PA measurement, but practical challenges and limitations exist. While wearable cameras may not be feasible for use in large scale studies, they may be feasible in small scale studies where context is important. Full article
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Article
Feasibility of a Tai Chi with Thera-Band Training Program: A Pilot Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8462; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17228462 - 16 Nov 2020
Viewed by 712
Abstract
Tai Chi, combined with Thera-band (TCTB) exercise may be associated with an improvement in health where it increases physical fitness, improves psychological well-being, and decreases pain. This paper aimed to determine the feasibility of TCTB exercise in older sedentary office workers. Forty office [...] Read more.
Tai Chi, combined with Thera-band (TCTB) exercise may be associated with an improvement in health where it increases physical fitness, improves psychological well-being, and decreases pain. This paper aimed to determine the feasibility of TCTB exercise in older sedentary office workers. Forty office workers aged over 55 years participated in a pilot randomized controlled trial (i.e., 12-week TCTB exercise or Tai Chi exercise only). Feasibility of the TCTB exercise approach was ascertained through the recruitment and enrolment rate, acceptability of the study intervention by participants including retention and adherence rates, participants’ learning process, the appropriateness of data collection as well as the participants’ evaluation of the intervention. Recruitment took longer than planned, with a low recruitment rate of 2.0% (42/2020), but a high enrolment rate of 95.2% (40/42). Thirty-one participants (i.e., 77.5%) completed the intervention. Of those who completed the trial, the overall average attendance was reported as 85.2%; 84.7% in the TCTB group and 85.7% in the Tai Chi only group. A total of 58.3% of participants (n = 21) could independently practice the TCTB or Tai Chi exercise motions at the end of the learning stage. There were no missing data except for the nine participants who withdrew during the intervention. No adverse events or effects were reported, and all participants were satisfied with the 12-week exercise intervention. Results support the feasibility of a large-scale randomized controlled trial to explore the efficacy of a TCTB program for improving health in older sedentary office workers. Full article
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