Special Issue "Parenting in the Digital Society and Healthy Development"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Oscar Fernando García
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: family socialization; self-esteem; academic motivation at school; adolescence and adulthood; peer relationships and school adjustment; and measurement techniques (self-esteem and parenting)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Parenting is one of the most important factors related to healthy development. Scholars capture parenting through two theoretical orthogonal dimensions (i.e., unrelated): warmth and strictness. Traditionally, authoritative parenting (warmth and strictness) has been constantly identified as the optimal strategy for the healthy development of children and adolescents and even adult children. Nonetheless, the impact of parenting on psychosocial development might be different depending on the cultural context. For example, authoritarian parenting (strictness without warmth) has been associated with some benefits in American ethnic minorities (e.g., African-American and Chinese-American), or in Arab countries.

Additionally, a growing set of studies seriously questions whether parental strictness is necessary for healthy development in the digital society. Indulgent parenting (warmth without strictness) has been related to equal or even better short- and long-term socialization outcomes than authoritative parenting (warmth with strictness) among adolescents and adult children. Interestingly, it seems that the third emerging stage (i.e., indulgent parenting) could be related to healthy development even in individualistic countries (e.g., United Kingdom, United States, and Sweden). It is possible that the three stages for optimal parenting (i.e., authoritative, authoritarian and indulgent styles) can concur, at the same time, in different environments, context, and cultures, so there is a need to examine the impact of parenting on psychosocial development in different countries and settings across the globe.

This Special Issue is open to high-quality contributions on the study of healthy development, especially those focused on the role of parents.

Dr. Oscar Fernando García
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Parental warmth and strictness
  • Parenting styles
  • Authoritative parenting
  • Indulgent parenting
  • Authoritarian parenting
  • Neglectful parenting
  • Children and adolescents
  • Adulthood
  • Healthy development
  • Competence and adjustment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Family Processes, Parenting Practices, and Psychosocial Maturity of Chinese Youths: A Latent Variable Interaction and Mediation Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4357; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18084357 - 20 Apr 2021
Viewed by 484
Abstract
Development of psychosocial maturity has profound implications for youths’ well-being and positive development in the long run. Nevertheless, little research has investigated the way family socialization contributes to youths’ psychosocial maturity. Both the concepts of family socialization and psychosocial maturity are multifaceted and [...] Read more.
Development of psychosocial maturity has profound implications for youths’ well-being and positive development in the long run. Nevertheless, little research has investigated the way family socialization contributes to youths’ psychosocial maturity. Both the concepts of family socialization and psychosocial maturity are multifaceted and latent, which may lead to biased results if studied by manifest variables. Also, no existing research has discovered how different family socialization components interact latently to contribute to youths’ psychosocial maturity. The current study, based on a sample of 533 Chinese parent-youth dyads, examined the effects of family socialization by positive family processes and authoritative parenting, and their latent interaction in an integrated moderation and mediation modeling framework on Chinese youths’ psychosocial maturity. Results showed that both positive family processes and authoritative parenting, and their latent interaction significantly predicted the higher psychosocial maturity of Chinese youths. Authoritative parenting acted as a mediator for the relationship between positive family processes and Chinese youths’ psychosocial maturity. Furthermore, the mediating effect of authoritative parenting was conditioned by different contexts of positive family processes, the strongest and least strong effects found in high and low positive family processes, respectively, and moderate effect observed in medium positive family processes. Findings of the current study contribute to our understanding of the complicated family mechanism in relation to youth development, especially in this digital era. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parenting in the Digital Society and Healthy Development)
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Article
Aggressiveness in Adopted and Non-Adopted Teens: The Role of Parenting, Attachment Security, and Gender
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2034; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18042034 - 19 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 790
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the relationship among aggressiveness, parenting practices, and attachment security in adolescents, assessing maternal and paternal effects separately. Two different subsamples of adolescents between 12 and 16 years old participated in the study (n = [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to examine the relationship among aggressiveness, parenting practices, and attachment security in adolescents, assessing maternal and paternal effects separately. Two different subsamples of adolescents between 12 and 16 years old participated in the study (n = 157): 67 adopted adolescents (61.2% girls) and 90 non-adopted adolescents (56.7% girls). Partial and full mediation models were analyzed in multi-group structural equation models (using maximum likelihood estimates), allocating non-adoptive and adoptive adolescents into two different groups. Results showed that whereas acceptance/involvement of each parent predicted attachment security towards the corresponding parental figure, only the father’s coercion/imposition predicted aggressiveness, and only attachment security to the mother was a (negative) predictor of adolescent’s aggressiveness. The partial mediation model provided the most parsimonious explanation for the data, showing no differences between adopted and non-adopted subsamples and supporting a good model fit for both boys and girls in a multi-group invariance analysis. The implications of these results are discussed in light of the protective effects of care relationships in early adolescence (vs. late adolescence) as well as the differential role of parent figures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parenting in the Digital Society and Healthy Development)
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Article
Parental Beliefs about Childhood and Adolescence from a Longitudinal Perspective
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1760; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041760 - 11 Feb 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 791
Abstract
Research into family context as a socializing agent points to the need to take parental beliefs into account due to the role they play in both parenting strategies and, ultimately, in the psychosocial adjustment of children and adolescents. The present study aims to [...] Read more.
Research into family context as a socializing agent points to the need to take parental beliefs into account due to the role they play in both parenting strategies and, ultimately, in the psychosocial adjustment of children and adolescents. The present study aims to explore possible relationships between parental beliefs about childhood and adolescence from a longitudinal and qualitative perspective. The beliefs held by parents of teenagers about adolescence are compared with those they hold about childhood at that same moment, and the evolution of these ideas is charted over the course of 16 years as their children grow. A total of 102 parents participated in the longitudinal study. They completed two types of semi-structured interviews: one of them throughout the entire study period and the other once their children became teenagers. The results reveal an association between the type of beliefs parents hold about childhood and their perception of adolescence, and they indicate that these ideas change over time as more adjusted and modern beliefs about child development correlate with a more positive perception of adolescence. These results are interpreted from the perspective of their influence on beliefs about parenting styles, reflecting what is reported in the recent literature regarding the most successful styles for fostering children’s and adolescents’ psychosocial adjustment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parenting in the Digital Society and Healthy Development)
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Article
Parenting Warmth and Strictness across Three Generations: Parenting Styles and Psychosocial Adjustment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7487; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17207487 - 15 Oct 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1462
Abstract
Recent emergent research is seriously questioning whether parental strictness contributes to children’s psychosocial adjustment in all cultural contexts. We examined cross-generational differences in parental practices characterized by warmth and practices characterized by strictness, as well as the relationship between parenting styles (authoritative, indulgent, [...] Read more.
Recent emergent research is seriously questioning whether parental strictness contributes to children’s psychosocial adjustment in all cultural contexts. We examined cross-generational differences in parental practices characterized by warmth and practices characterized by strictness, as well as the relationship between parenting styles (authoritative, indulgent, authoritarian, and neglectful) and psychosocial adjustment in adulthood. Parenting practices characterized by warmth (affection, reasoning, indifference, and detachment) and strictness (revoking privileges, verbal scolding, and physical punishment) were examined. Psychosocial adjustment was captured with multidimensional self-concept and well-being (life satisfaction and happiness). Participants were 871 individuals who were members of three generations of Spanish families: College students (G3), their parents (G2), and their grandparents (G1). Results showed two different cross-generational patterns in parenting practices, with an increased tendency toward parental warmth (parents use more affection and reasoning but less indifference across generations) and a decreased tendency toward parental strictness (parents use revoking privileges, verbal scolding, and physical punishment less across generations). Interestingly, despite cross-generational differences in parenting practices, a common pattern between parenting styles and psychosocial adjustment was found: indulgent parenting was related to equal or even better self-concept and well-being than authoritative parenting, whereas parenting characterized by non-warmth (authoritarian and neglectful) was related to poor scores. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parenting in the Digital Society and Healthy Development)
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