Special Issue "Pelvic Health and Human Movement"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Javier Jerez-Roig
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research group on Methodology, Methods, Models and Outcomes of Health and Social Sciences (M3O). Faculty of Health Science and Welfare. Centre for Health and Social Care Research (CESS). University of Vic-Central University of Catalonia (UVic-UCC), C. Sagrada Família, 7, 08500 Vic, Spain
Interests: public health; epidemiology; older adults; active aging; health-related interventions; sedentary behavior; motor activity; physical activity; pelvic floor; incontinence; urinary incontinence; fecal incontinence
Dr. Joanne Booth
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Ageing Well Research Group, School of Health & Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA, United Kingdom
Interests: bladder health; urinary symptoms; incontinence; health-related interventions; older adults; physical activity; sedentary behavior; pelvic health; older adults; stroke
Dr. Suzanne Hagen
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit, Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA
Interests: pelvic health; pelvic floor dysfunction; urinary symptoms; incontinence; health-related interventions; older adults; physical activity
Prof. Dr. María Giné-Garriga
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Psychology, Education and Sport Sciences Blanquerna, Ramon Llull University, Císter 34, 08022 Barcelona, Spain.2. Faculty of Health Sciences Blanquerna, Ramon Llull University, Padilla 326, 08025 Barcelona, Spain.
Interests: older adults; health-related interventions; movement behavior; physical activity; sedentary behavior; physical function; participatory health research; co-creation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pelvic health is an important topic for Public Health. Urinary incontinence (UI), fecal incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse are pelvic dysfunctions that affect more than 30% of the population. These conditions impair quality of life of people who suffer from them and also cause a significant socioeconomic impact to society.

With the progressive aging process, pelvic health issues tend to increase, whereas physical activity (PA) tends to reduce. The frailty process experienced by many older people can be associated with deterioration in bladder and bowel health as well as other common condition of aging, such as falls and cognitive impairment. However, the mechanisms of association have not been elucidated yet.

To maintain bladder and bowel function, PA plays an important role as a modifiable protective factor for pelvic dysfunctions, such as UI; adequate PA can prevent or even reduce UI. It is well known that sedentary behavior (SB) reduces functional performance and causes obesity, but the effects on pelvic health are less explored or understood. A causal pathway between low PA and development of urgency UI and overactive bladder has been suggested.

While numerous interventions to increase levels of PA and battle SB can be found in the scientific literature, understanding the relationship between PA, SB and bladder, and bowel and pelvic health is in its infancy. In addition, specific paramaters of these interventions are not totally clear and warrant futher research.

For this Special Issue, we invite researchers to submit their work on pelvic, bladder or bowel health and human movement (including SB-PA patterns, balance and falls, physical performance) across the lifespan. We are particularly interested in high-quality studies using qualitative, quantitative or mixed-methods approaches. We will accept manuscripts from different disciplines based on observational or intervention studies using primary or secondary data. Authors are invited to contribute novel work to be considered for publication in this Special Issue, including original articles, short communications, systematic reviews or meta-analyses.

Dr. Javier Jerez-Roig
Prof. Dr. Joanne Booth
Prof. Dr. María Giné-Garriga
Prof. Dr. Suzanne Hagen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • movement
  • sedentary behavior
  • motor activity
  • balance
  • physical functional performance
  • physical activity
  • pelvic floor
  • incontinence
  • urinary incontinence
  • fecal incontinence

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Urinary Incontinence in Physically Active Older Women of Northeast Brazil
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5878; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115878 - 30 May 2021
Viewed by 855
Abstract
Low- and moderate-impact physical activity (PA) is associated with the prevention of urinary incontinence (UI). The objective of the cross-sectional study presented herein is to analyze the factors associated with UI in physically older active women who participate in senior community groups. The [...] Read more.
Low- and moderate-impact physical activity (PA) is associated with the prevention of urinary incontinence (UI). The objective of the cross-sectional study presented herein is to analyze the factors associated with UI in physically older active women who participate in senior community groups. The variable UI was measured by the International Consultation Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF). Socioeconomic variables were also collected, along with data on life habits and clinical history. The multivariate analysis employed Poisson’s Regression with robust variance for factors associated with UI. Of the 106 participants evaluated, 54.7% presented UI, of which stress incontinence was more frequent, with 40.6%. UI presented a statistically significant association with dizziness/loss of balance during Activities of Daily Living (ADL) (prevalence ratio-PR 1.48; 95% CI 1.06–2.07) and nocturia (PR 1.63; 95% CI 1.05–2.55). Despite PA being a protection factor, UI presented an elevated prevalence in the older population, and therefore, other biological, social, and cultural aspects could also contribute to the occurrence of UI in this age group. Moreover, physically active older women with UI presented nocturia and dizziness/loss of balance during ADL, regardless of education levels and the number of births. These findings can help improve multi-professional programs aimed at promoting, preventing, and managing UI in the public. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pelvic Health and Human Movement)
Article
Is Cycling Practice Related to Men’s Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions? A Hypothesis-Generating Observational Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1923; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041923 - 17 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1376
Abstract
Background: There is a lack of consensus with regards to the consequences of cycling practice on urogenital and sexual problems in men. The aim of the study was to analyse the relationship between intensity of cycling practice and urinary tract symptoms, erectile dysfunction, [...] Read more.
Background: There is a lack of consensus with regards to the consequences of cycling practice on urogenital and sexual problems in men. The aim of the study was to analyse the relationship between intensity of cycling practice and urinary tract symptoms, erectile dysfunction, and urinary incontinence. Methods: Observational hypothesis-generating design. Cyclists, men, between 25 and 70 years who had been cycling for more than one year were included. During the statistical analysis, a multiple linear regression model, partial correlation and Spearman’s correlation were carried out. Results: Fifty-eight men participated in the study. Results showed that there is a correlation between years of cycling and prostate symptoms (p = 0.041), and between age and erectile dysfunction (p = 0.001). The multiple linear regression model and the partial correlation analysis showed a correlation between the years of cycling and prostate symptoms (p = 0.007 and p = 0.018). Conclusions: The results have shown that there is a slight correlation between the years of cycling and the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms, independently of the man’s age. Therefore, the results display that high-intensity cycling practice might impact negatively in some men’s pelvic floor functions. Further research is needed to analyse the impact of cycling on urogenital problems in this population group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pelvic Health and Human Movement)
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