Special Issue "Opportunities and Responsibilities in Pharmaceutical Care"

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Tinne Dilles
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Research and Innovation in Care, NuPhaC, University of Antwerp, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
Interests: patient safety; pharmaceutical care; interprofessional care; implementation science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Medicines administration is an important part of the treatment of many patients. Achieving a therapy tailored to individual patients, with a maximum of therapeutic effects and a minimum of adverse effects, can be challenging.  It requires significant efforts by patients, informal caregivers, interprofessional teams of healthcare providers, and the healthcare system. It also involves respectful agreements of all stakeholders on responsibilities throughout the complex process of pharmaceutical care.

On 11 March 2020, the Council of Europe adopted a new resolution [1] on pharmaceutical care, i.e., the responsible provision of drug therapy for the purpose of achieving definite outcomes that improve a patient’s quality of life [2]. The resolution focuses on how pharmaceutical care can be implemented for the benefit of patients and health services.

From the resolution, several challenges and opportunities can be derived to optimise pharmaceutical care through an interprofessional and patient-centred approach. Steps considered in the process are: 1) assessment of patient’s medication and health status; 2) identification and prioritisation of medication-related problems; 3) selection of interventions and formulation of a pharmaceutical care plan; 4) patient agreement, implementation and monitoring; and 5) patient follow-up.

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is devoted to making a substantial contribution to the implementation of pharmaceutical care for the benefit of patients and health services.  We welcome manuscripts within this scope, based on varied healthcare settings, patient populations or healthcare professions. We encourage translational research that tests new approaches incorporating person-centred design or technology support or considering implementation strategies.

  1. The Council of Europe Resolution CM/Res(2020)3 on implementation of pharmaceutical care for the benefit of patients and health services https://search.coe.int/cm/pages/result_details.aspx?objectid=09000016809cdf26 (Accessed on 30 October 2020)
  2. Hepler C.D. and Strand L.M., Opportunities and Responsibilities in Pharmaceutical Care, American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy 1990; 47, 533–543.

Prof. Dr. Tinne Dilles
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Pharmaceutical care
  • Medicines optimisation
  • Medication review
  • Medication reconciliation
  • Medication adherence
  • Medication (self-)management
  • Responsibilities/ Role’s in pharmaceutical care
  • Drug monitoring
  • Medication-related problems
  • Polypharmacy
  • Interprofessional pharmaceutical care
  • Patient centred pharmaceutical care
  • Implementation of pharmaceutical care within the health system
  • Medication Safety

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Assessing Medication Adherence Barriers to Short-Term Oral Antibiotic Treatment in Primary Care—Development and Validation of a Self-Report Questionnaire (BIOTICA)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7768; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18157768 - 22 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Background: Pharmacists are increasingly involved in strategies to fight antimicrobial resistance by ensuring optimised antibiotic (AB) use, including adherence support. Successful adherence interventions should be tailored to patients’ barriers and validated instruments are needed. This study aimed to identify adherence barriers to AB [...] Read more.
Background: Pharmacists are increasingly involved in strategies to fight antimicrobial resistance by ensuring optimised antibiotic (AB) use, including adherence support. Successful adherence interventions should be tailored to patients’ barriers and validated instruments are needed. This study aimed to identify adherence barriers to AB treatment, develop a self-report questionnaire, and validate it in outpatients. Method: Adherence barriers were identified through a systematic literature search and focus group discussion. Unmodifiable and irrelevant barriers were excluded from further processing. A validation study assessed the questionnaire’s internal reliability and construct validity by comparing the questionnaire’s score with electronically monitored adherence data. Results: A 15-item questionnaire was created. Overall, 68 patients were included in the construct validation analysis (60.3% female). The mean consecutive taking adherence was 88% and the most frequently reported barriers were “worries about side-effects” (37%) and “having swallowing difficulties” (19%). Three items were excluded from the questionnaire, which was supported by an increase of Cronbach’s alpha (0.69 to 0.70). The 12-item version’s score correlated significantly with medication adherence rate (r = −0.34, p < 0.01). Conclusion: The self-report questionnaire is a reliable and valid tool to pre-emptively assess adherence barriers in outpatients prescribed ABs. In the future, appropriate adherence interventions can be matched to barriers and tested in a pilot intervention study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Opportunities and Responsibilities in Pharmaceutical Care)
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Article
What Happens after Hospital Discharge? Deficiencies in Medication Management Encountered by Geriatric Patients with Polypharmacy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7031; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18137031 - 30 Jun 2021
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Abstract
This study aimed to describe post-discharge medication self-management by geriatric patients with polypharmacy, to describe the problems encountered and to determine the related factors. In a multicenter study from November 2019 to March 2020, data were collected at hospital discharge and two to [...] Read more.
This study aimed to describe post-discharge medication self-management by geriatric patients with polypharmacy, to describe the problems encountered and to determine the related factors. In a multicenter study from November 2019 to March 2020, data were collected at hospital discharge and two to five days post-discharge. Geriatric patients with polypharmacy were questioned about medication management using a combination of validated (MedMaIDE) and self-developed questionnaires. Of 400 participants, 70% did self-manage medication post-discharge. Patients had a mean of four different deficiencies in post-discharge medication management (SD 2.17, range 0–10). Knowledge-related deficiencies were most common. The number of medicines and the in-hospital provision of medication management by nurses were significant predictors of post-discharge medication management deficiencies. In addition to deficiencies in knowledge, medication-taking ability and obtaining medication, non-adherence and disrupted continuity of medication self-management were common in geriatric patients with polypharmacy post-discharge. Improvements in in-hospital preparation could avoid medication self-management problems at home. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Opportunities and Responsibilities in Pharmaceutical Care)
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Review

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Review
Nurses and Pharmaceutical Care: Interprofessional, Evidence-Based Working to Improve Patient Care and Outcomes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5973; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18115973 - 02 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Pharmaceutical care necessitates significant efforts from patients, informal caregivers, the interprofessional team of health care professionals and health care system administrators. Collaboration, mutual respect and agreement amongst all stakeholders regarding responsibilities throughout the complex process of pharmaceutical care is needed before patients can [...] Read more.
Pharmaceutical care necessitates significant efforts from patients, informal caregivers, the interprofessional team of health care professionals and health care system administrators. Collaboration, mutual respect and agreement amongst all stakeholders regarding responsibilities throughout the complex process of pharmaceutical care is needed before patients can take full advantage of modern medicine. Based on the literature and policy documents, in this position paper, we reflect on opportunities for integrated evidence-based pharmaceutical care to improve care quality and patient outcomes from a nursing perspective. Despite the consensus that interprofessional collaboration is essential, in clinical practice, research, education and policy-making challenges are often not addressed interprofessionally. This paper concludes with specific advises to move towards the implementation of more interprofessional, evidence-based pharmaceutical care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Opportunities and Responsibilities in Pharmaceutical Care)
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