Special Issue "Primary Care and Global Community Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Tara Zolnikov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Community Health, National University, San Diego, CA 92123, USA
Interests: global health; psychology; human development; environmental health; public health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue has a focus on health within a global setting. Using data and research from populations and communities worldwide, the journal will accept submissions on global health problems concerning their development, investigation, and interventions or solutions. This information will give readers an understanding of the reciprocal nature of anthropogenic effects on the environment and the negative or hazardous effects that the environment can have on humans. For example, climate change can be discussed, focusing on areas where humans contribute to climate change and how humans are equally affected; additionally, solutions will be discussed with a final goal to provide a comprehensive view on the issue. Ultimately, the potential impact on human health that occurs around the world can be explored and further understood.

Dr. Tara Zolnikov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Global health
  • Population health
  • Adverse health
  • Community health
  • Environment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Global Health in Swedish Nursing Curricula: Navigating the Desirable and the Necessary
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9372; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179372 - 05 Sep 2021
Viewed by 418
Abstract
Global health challenges are likely to be aggravated in the coming years by rapid climate change and environmental degradation. To address the resulting health inequities, nurses need an integrated understanding of environmental and social determinants of health. This study adopts an explorative inductive [...] Read more.
Global health challenges are likely to be aggravated in the coming years by rapid climate change and environmental degradation. To address the resulting health inequities, nurses need an integrated understanding of environmental and social determinants of health. This study adopts an explorative inductive approach to examine how global health and sustainability are expressed the course syllabi of undergraduate nursing programmes (n = 24) in Sweden. After excluding biomedical and other unrelated content, 67 syllabi were selected for a thematic analysis. Results indicate that global health, the social determinants of health and sustainability tend to appear in a fragmented manner in the syllabi. Global health content is often limited, relegated to elective courses, or altogether missing. A theoretical framework is lacking, and focus lies on an individual rather than structural perspective. Based on international policy, earlier studies on undergraduate nursing education and theoretical work, suggestions are made for how global health and sustainability content could be integrated into nursing education, notably by using a structural competency approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Primary Care and Global Community Health)
Article
Assessment of Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Antibiotic Use among the Population of Boyolali, Indonesia: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8258; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168258 - 04 Aug 2021
Viewed by 599
Abstract
Misuse and overuse of antibiotics are potential causes of the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance (ABR). Having information about the knowledge, attitude, and practices concerning antibiotics use by the public might help control ABR growth. Therefore, this cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the [...] Read more.
Misuse and overuse of antibiotics are potential causes of the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance (ABR). Having information about the knowledge, attitude, and practices concerning antibiotics use by the public might help control ABR growth. Therefore, this cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the levels and associated factors of knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of antibiotics use among the public. A questionnaire was designed and validated, which consisted of a total of 51 questions with four sections: demographics (6), knowledge (20), attitude (12), and practice (13) to measure KAP. Univariate analysis (using Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis analysis) was applied to assess the differences in the mean scores of KAP. Linear regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with KAP. Finally, using Spearman analysis we have examined the correlation between responses to the KAP. The sample size of this study was 575, with a 99.96% response rate. Regarding knowledge, 73.12% of respondents stated that antibiotics could be used to treat viral infections, and 63.35% of respondents answered that antibiotics could reduce fever. Concerning attitude, 50% of respondents had considered stopping taking antibiotics as soon as symptoms had disappeared. In analyzing practice, we found 40% of respondents obtained antibiotics from a pharmacy without a prescription from a physician, a nurse, or a midwife. Statistical analysis revealed that KAP about antibiotic use was significantly associated with gender, area of residence, level of education, and monthly income (p < 0.05). Our findings concluded that men, respondents with low income, those with low-level education, and those living in rural areas are more prone to excessive use of antibiotics without knowing the adverse effects of improper use and how it can contribute to high ABR. So it is urgently necessary to strengthen policies on antibiotics use, including drug provision, distribution, and sales. In addition, people with low KAP should be a priority consideration in education outreach initiatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Primary Care and Global Community Health)
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