Special Issue "Problematic Internet Use: A Biopsychosocial Model – Version II"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Communication and Informatics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Luca Cerniglia
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Silvia Cimino
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Guest Editor
Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, 00186 Rome, Italy
Interests: developmental psychopathology; eating disorders; parent–infant interactions
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Giulia Ballarotto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Via degli Apuli, 1, 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: developmental psychopathology; intersubjectivity; epigenetics; parental psychopathology; problematic internet use; internalizing/externalizing symptoms
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last decade, there has been an enormous development of new forms of Internet use and communication technology, such as social media, personal computers, mobile phones, and other devices.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, these technologies proved useful to keep individuals in contact, even if quarantined or isolated, promoting resilience against possible negative behavioral and psychological outcomes. In these challenging times, the Internet has also allowed distance learning.

Although these important potentialities are recognized, frequent and prolonged use of the web has been associated in previous studies with distress, anxiety, addiction, and psychopathological symptoms, especially among children and adolescents. International literature has posited that these clinical manifestations are predicted, mediated, and/or moderated by familial, genetic, and relational factors, even if very few studies have so far investigated these issues encompassing the potentially negative contribution of the pandemic.

This Special Issue will be dedicated to scientific research on the above issues, with particular attention to studies that use a biopsychosocial point of view. In particular, the presentation of interdisciplinary work and multicountry collaborative research is encouraged. In particular, studies are encouraged which consider the epigenetic characteristics of the subjects.

This Special Issue will welcome original research articles using different study projects (both longitudinal studies and cross-sectional studies), or systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

Prof. Dr. Luca Cerniglia
Prof. Dr. Silvia Cimino
Dr. Giulia Ballarotto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19 pandemic
  • Problematic internet use
  • Behavioral addiction
  • Children
  • Adolescents
  • Biopsychosocial model
  • Epigenetic

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Modulation of Instagram Number of Followings by Avoidance in Close Relationships in Young Adults under a Gene x Environment Perspective
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7547; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147547 - 15 Jul 2021
Viewed by 893
Abstract
Social networking sites have determined radical changes in human life, demanding investigations on online socialization mechanisms. The knowledge acquired on in-person sociability could guide researchers to consider both environmental and genetic features as candidates of online socialization. Here, we explored the impact of [...] Read more.
Social networking sites have determined radical changes in human life, demanding investigations on online socialization mechanisms. The knowledge acquired on in-person sociability could guide researchers to consider both environmental and genetic features as candidates of online socialization. Here, we explored the impact of the quality of adult attachment and the genetic properties of the Serotonin Transporter Gene (5-HTTLPR) on Instagram social behavior. Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised questionnaire was adopted to assess 57 Instagram users’ attachment pattern in close relationships with partners. Genotypes from the 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 region were extracted from the users’ buccal mucosa and analyzed. Users’ Instagram social behavior was examined from four indexes: number of posts, number of followed users (“followings”) and number of followers, and the Social Desirability Index calculated from the followers to followings ratio. Although no interaction between rs25531 and ECR-R dimensions was found, an association between avoidance in close relationships and Instagram number of followings emerged. Post hoc analyses revealed adult avoidance from the partner predicts the Instagram number of followings with good evidence. Moreover, users reporting high avoidance levels displayed fewer followings than users who reported low levels of avoidance. This research provides a window into the psychobiological understanding of online socialization on Instagram. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Problematic Internet Use: A Biopsychosocial Model – Version II)
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