Special Issue "Risk Prediction Tools for Gynaecological Cancer in Primary Care"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Women's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jan Y. Verbakel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2. Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK
Interests: point-of-care testing; risk prediction modelling; infectious diseases; antibiotic prescribing; diagnostic research; pediatrics; gynaecological cancer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Early diagnosis of symptomatic gynaecological cancer is likely to improve patient outcomes, including survival. The primary care practitioner has a key role to play in this; they must recognize the symptoms and signs of gynaecological cancer and make prompt evidence-based decisions regarding further investigation and referral. However, this is often difficult as many of the symptoms of gynaecological cancers are nonspecific and are more likely to be caused by benign rather than malignant disease. As primary care is generally the first point of patient contact, those working in this setting usually encounter cancer patients at an earlier, and possibly less symptomatic, stage than practitioners in secondary care. Despite these challenges, research has improved our understanding of the symptoms patients present to primary care with, and a range of tests and prediction tools now exist to aid early diagnosis. Primary care practitioners can also play a key role in gynaecological cancer prevention. A significant proportion of gynaecological cancer is preventable either through lifestyle changes such as weight loss, or, for cervical cancer, vaccination and/or engagement with screening programs.

In this Special Issue, we concentrate on gynaecological cancer and focus on the three most common forms that a primary care practitioner is likely to encounter: ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer.

Prof. Dr. Jan Y. Verbakel
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • risk prediction modelling
  • gynaecological cancer
  • endometrial cancer
  • ovarian cancer
  • cervical cancer
  • cancer prevention
  • early cancer diagnosis
  • cancer referrals
  • general practice
  • oncology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Different Influences of Endometriosis and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease on the Occurrence of Ovarian Cancer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8754; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168754 - 19 Aug 2021
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Abstract
To compare the rate and risk of ovarian cancer in patients with endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). A nationwide population cohort research compared the risk of ovarian cancer in 135,236 age-matched comparison females, 114,726 PID patients, and 20,510 endometriosis patients out of [...] Read more.
To compare the rate and risk of ovarian cancer in patients with endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). A nationwide population cohort research compared the risk of ovarian cancer in 135,236 age-matched comparison females, 114,726 PID patients, and 20,510 endometriosis patients out of 982,495 females between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2014 and ended on the date of confirmation of ovarian cancer, death, or 31 December 2014. In order to reduce the unbalanced characteristics, propensity score matching (PSM) was performed for 20,478 females in each subgroup. The incidence rate (per 100,000 person–years) of ovarian cancer was 8.74 (95% CI, 7.16–10.66) in comparison, 9.26 (7.54–11.39) in PID, and 28.73 (21.07–39.16) in endometriosis cohorts. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of ovarian cancer was 1.17 (p = 0.296) in PID and 3.12 (p < 0.001) in endometriosis cohorts, compared with the comparison cohort in full cohort, using the multiple Cox regression model. The aHR of ovarian cancer was 0.83 (p = 0.650) in PID and 3.03 (p = 0.001) in endometriosis cohorts, compared with the comparison cohort after performing PSM. In the full cohort and PSM population, the cumulative incidence rate of ovarian cancer was significantly higher in patients with endometriosis than in those with PID or in the comparison cohort (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001). In conclusion, after considering the differences in the impacts of exposure to endometriosis or PID, patients with endometriosis were more likely to develop ovarian cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Prediction Tools for Gynaecological Cancer in Primary Care)
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Review

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Review
Interventions Preventing Vaginitis, Vaginal Atrophy after Brachytherapy or Radiotherapy Due to Malignant Tumors of the Female Reproductive Organs—A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3932; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18083932 - 08 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1100
Abstract
Background: Radiotherapy, as a method of treatment of cervical and uterine cancers, may induce severe late-onset vaginal side effects. Unfortunately, little evidence on the management of adverse effects has been presented. This study aimed to evaluate the available interventions which reduce symptoms of [...] Read more.
Background: Radiotherapy, as a method of treatment of cervical and uterine cancers, may induce severe late-onset vaginal side effects. Unfortunately, little evidence on the management of adverse effects has been presented. This study aimed to evaluate the available interventions which reduce symptoms of vaginitis and vaginal atrophy by improving dyspareunia, mucosal inflammation, vaginal pH and vaginal dryness in women who have undergone brachytherapy or radiotherapy due to uterine or cervical malignancies. Materials and methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed following PRISMA guidelines. The systematic search was conducted using electronic databases, namely Scopus, Web of Science and PubMed, between October and November 2020 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCT) and, prospective randomized studies (PRS). Results: The analyzed population consists of 376 patients with uterine or cervical cancer, treated with hyaluronic acid, vitamin A, vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol acetate and dienestrol. Intervention with HA along with vitamin A and vitamin E revealed advantage in endpoints such as reduced dyspareunia, vaginal mucosal inflammation, vaginal dryness, bleeding, fibrosis and cellular atypia. Administration of alpha-tocopherol acetate reduced vaginal mucosal inflammation and improved vaginal acanthosis, whereas dienestrol resulted in reduced dyspareunia, vaginal caliber and bleeding. Conclusions: Vaginal suppositories were found to be clinically effective at the management of late-onset vulvovaginal side effects after radiotherapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Prediction Tools for Gynaecological Cancer in Primary Care)
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