Special Issue "Screening and Treatment of Perinatal Depression and Anxiety"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Women's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Francesca Agostini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology “Renzo Canestrari”, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna, Italy
Interests: transition to parenthood; perinatal psychopathology; assessment for perinatal mental disorders; developmental psychopathology; assisted reproductive technology; preterm birth

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Among the perinatal mental disorders, perinatal depression in women has received much attention in the research and clinical field in the last 20 years. Many areas have been investigated, including the prevalence, risk factors, and consequences for child development, mothers’ mental health, and parental couples’ adjustment. Methods for the identification of possibly depressed women have also been explored since the development of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; Cox et al., 1987), favoring the implementation of screening activities and tailored psychological interventions.

More recently, the investigation of perinatal anxiety has received increasing interest among researchers along with the identification of both perinatal depression and anxiety in the male population, highlighting the need to further investigate these issues in the literature.

Manuscripts addressing the following topics will be especially welcomed: the improvement of screening methods in clinical settings and mental health services; empirical contributions for the implementation of guidelines and strategies of assessment; validation studies of new instruments for the screening of perinatal anxiety and depression, especially addressed to the paternal population; evaluation of different modalities, and techniques of psychological intervention.

Furthermore, empirical studies investigating possible changes to the screening and intervention methods due to the spread of COVID-19 are of special interest for submission to this issue.

Authors are encouraged to prepare a short abstract to be sent to the Guest Editor in advance to assess the pertinence of their proposal. 

Dr. Francesca Agostini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • perinatal depression
  • perinatal anxiety
  • parenting
  • men/fathers
  • assessment
  • screening
  • diagnosis
  • validation studies
  • psychological intervention
  • COVID-19

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Relevance of Insomnia in the Diagnosis of Perinatal Depression: Validation of the Italian Version of the Insomnia Symptom Questionnaire
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(23), 12507; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182312507 (registering DOI) - 27 Nov 2021
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Abstract
Background. Sleep disorders are common in perinatal women and may underlie or trigger anxiety and depression. We aimed to translate and validate and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Insomnia Symptom Questionnaire (ISQ), in a sample of women during [...] Read more.
Background. Sleep disorders are common in perinatal women and may underlie or trigger anxiety and depression. We aimed to translate and validate and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Insomnia Symptom Questionnaire (ISQ), in a sample of women during late pregnancy and 6-months postpartum according to the DSM-5 criteria. Methods. The ISQ was administered to 292 women prenatally along with other measures of sleep quality, depression, and anxiety, to examine its construct and convergent validity. Women were readministered the ISQ six months postdelivery to assess test–retest reliability. Women were divided into DSM-5 No-Insomnia (N = 253) and Insomnia (N = 39) groups. Results. The insomnia group had received more psychopharmacotherapy, had more psychiatric family history, increased rates of medically assisted reproduction, of past perinatal psychiatric disorders, and scored higher on almost all TEMPS-A dimensions, on the EPDS, HCL-32, PSQI, and on ISQ prenatally and postnatally. ISQ scores correlated with all scales, indicating adequate convergent and discriminant validity; furthermore, it showed antenatal–postnatal test–retest reliability, 97.5% diagnostic accuracy, 79.5% sensitivity, 94.9% specificity, 70.5% positive predictive power, and 92.8% negative predictive power. Conclusions. The ISQ is useful, valid, and reliable for assessing perinatal insomnia in Italian women. The Italian version showed equivalent properties to the original version. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Screening and Treatment of Perinatal Depression and Anxiety)
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Article
Pandemic Stress and Its Correlates among Pregnant Women during the Second Wave of COVID-19 in Poland
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11140; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182111140 - 23 Oct 2021
Viewed by 653
Abstract
Background: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has created numerous stressful conditions, especially for vulnerable populations such as pregnant women. Pandemic-related pregnancy stress consists of two dimensions: stress associated with feeling unprepared for birth due to the pandemic (Preparedness Stress), and stress related to fears [...] Read more.
Background: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has created numerous stressful conditions, especially for vulnerable populations such as pregnant women. Pandemic-related pregnancy stress consists of two dimensions: stress associated with feeling unprepared for birth due to the pandemic (Preparedness Stress), and stress related to fears of perinatal COVID-19 infection (Perinatal Infection Stress). The purpose of our study was to elucidate the association between various factors—sociodemographic, obstetric, pandemic-related, and situational—and pandemic stress in its two dimensions during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Polish pregnant women. Methods: A cross-sectional study with a total of 1119 pregnant women recruited during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Poland (between November 2020 and January 2021). Participants were recruited via social media to complete an online study questionnaire that included sociodemographic, obstetric, situational, and COVID-19 pandemic factors, as well as the Pandemic-Related Pregnancy Stress Scale (PREPS). Results: Nearly 38.5% of participants reported high Preparedness Stress; 26% reported high Perinatal Infection Stress. Multivariate analyses indicated that lack of COVID-19 diagnosis, higher compliance with safety rules and restrictions, and limited access to outdoor space were independently associated with moderate to severe levels of Infection Stress. Current emotional or psychiatric problems, nulliparity, limited access to outdoor space, and alterations to obstetric visits were independently associated with moderate to severe Preparedness Stress. Conclusion: Study findings suggest that particular attention should be focused on the groups of pregnant women who are most vulnerable to pandemic-related stress and therefore may be more prone to adverse outcomes associated with prenatal stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Screening and Treatment of Perinatal Depression and Anxiety)
Article
Factor Structure of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in a Sample of Postpartum Slovak Women
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6298; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126298 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 828
Abstract
Background: Postpartum depression has a negative impact on quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Slovak version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Methods: A paper and pencil version of [...] Read more.
Background: Postpartum depression has a negative impact on quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Slovak version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Methods: A paper and pencil version of the 10-item EPDS questionnaire was administered personally to 577 women at baseline during their stay in hospital on the second to fourth day postpartum (age, 30.6 ± 4.9 years; 73.5% vaginal births vs. 26.5% operative births; 59.4% primiparas). A total of 198 women participated in the online follow-up 6–8 weeks postpartum (questionnaire sent via e-mail). Results: The Slovak version of the EPDS had Cronbach’s coefficients of 0.84 and 0.88 at baseline (T1) and follow-up, respectively. The three-dimensional model of the scale offered good fit for both the baseline (χ2(df = 28) = 1339.38, p < 0.001; CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.02, and TLI = 0.99) and follow-up (χ2(df = 45) = 908.06, p < 0.001, CFI = 0.93, RMSEA = 0.09, and TL = 0.90). A risk of major depression (EPDS score ≥ 13) was identified in 6.1% in T1 and 11.6% in the follow-up. Elevated levels of depression symptoms (EPDS score ≥ 10) were identified in 16.7% and 22.7% of the respondents at baseline and follow-up, respectively. Conclusions: The Slovak translation of the EPDS showed good consistency, convergent validity, and model characteristics. The routine use of EPDS can contribute to improving the quality of postnatal health care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Screening and Treatment of Perinatal Depression and Anxiety)
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