Special Issue "The Role of Sedentary Behaviour in Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Public Health Statistics and Risk Assessment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Daniel P. Bailey
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Life Sciences, Brunel University London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, UK
Interests: the effects of prolonged sitting on human health and disease; development and evaluation of interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

You are invited to submit manuscripts to the Special Issue of “The Role of Sedentary Behaviour in Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes”. Sedentary behaviour is highly prevalent in modern society and is associated with a wide array of adverse health outcomes; this Special Issue focuses on the role of sedentary behaviour in cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. It is important to understand if the volume and pattern of sedentary behaviour (e.g., prolonged sedentary bouts and breaks in sedentary time) are associated with the incidence of these diseases, and what role physical activity may play in such relationships. The causal effects of different protocols for breaking up sitting time in different population groups on cardiometabolic risk markers requires further exploration in addition to understanding the mechanisms that are responsible for the observed metabolic effects. Sedentary behaviour may play an important role in the prevention and management of cardiometabolic disease. However, there is limited evidence regarding the development, implementation, and effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing and breaking up sedentary behaviour, particularly in groups that already suffer from cardiometabolic disease.

This Special Issue invites contributions that include (but are not limited to):

  • Epidemiology of sedentary behaviour and cardiovascular disease/type 2 diabetes;
  • Causal and mechanistic effects of breaking up sitting (e.g., laboratory and free-living experiments);
  • The development, evaluation, and effectiveness of interventions in reducing the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes or that help with the management of these diseases.

Dr. Daniel P. Bailey
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • diabetes
  • cardiometabolic risk
  • sitting
  • activity breaks
  • behaviour change
  • wellbeing
  • physical activity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Modelling the Reallocation of Time Spent Sitting into Physical Activity: Isotemporal Substitution vs. Compositional Isotemporal Substitution
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6210; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126210 - 08 Jun 2021
Viewed by 894
Abstract
Isotemporal substitution modelling (ISM) and compositional isotemporal modelling (CISM) are statistical approaches used in epidemiology to model the associations of replacing time in one physical behaviour with time in another. This study’s aim was to use both ISM and CISM to examine and [...] Read more.
Isotemporal substitution modelling (ISM) and compositional isotemporal modelling (CISM) are statistical approaches used in epidemiology to model the associations of replacing time in one physical behaviour with time in another. This study’s aim was to use both ISM and CISM to examine and compare associations of reallocating 60 min of sitting into standing or stepping with markers of cardiometabolic health. Cross-sectional data collected during three randomised control trials (RCTs) were utilised. All participants (n = 1554) were identified as being at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Reallocating 60 min from sitting to standing and to stepping was associated with a lower BMI, waist circumference, and triglycerides and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol using both ISM and CISM (p < 0.05). The direction and magnitude of significant associations were consistent across methods. No associations were observed for hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for either method. Results of both ISM and CISM were broadly similar, allowing for the interpretation of previous research, and should enable future research in order to make informed methodological, data-driven decisions. Full article
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Article
Rise and Recharge: Effects on Activity Outcomes of an e-Health Smartphone Intervention to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9300; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249300 - 12 Dec 2020
Viewed by 903
Abstract
This feasibility study evaluated the effects of an individual-level intervention to target office workers total and prolonged sedentary behaviour during working hours, using an e-health smartphone application. A three-arm (Prompt-30 or 60 min Intervention arm and a No-Prompt Comparison arm), quasi-randomised intervention was [...] Read more.
This feasibility study evaluated the effects of an individual-level intervention to target office workers total and prolonged sedentary behaviour during working hours, using an e-health smartphone application. A three-arm (Prompt-30 or 60 min Intervention arm and a No-Prompt Comparison arm), quasi-randomised intervention was conducted over 12 weeks. Behavioural outcomes (worktime sitting, standing, stepping, prolonged sitting, and physical activity) were monitored using accelerometers and anthropometrics measured at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Cardiometabolic measures were taken at baseline and 12 weeks. Fifty-six office workers (64% female) completed baseline assessments. The Prompt-60 arm was associated with a reduction in occupational sitting time at 6 (−46.8 min/8 h workday [95% confidence interval = −86.4, −6.6], p < 0.05) and 12 weeks (−69.6 min/8 h workday [−111.0, −28.2], p < 0.05) relative to the No-Prompt Comparison arm. Sitting was primarily replaced with standing in both arms (p > 0.05). Both Intervention arms reduced time in prolonged sitting bouts at 12 weeks (Prompt-30: −27.0 [−99.0, 45.0]; Prompt-60: −25.8 [−98.4, 47.4] min/8 h workday; both p > 0.05). There were no changes in steps or cardiometabolic risk. Findings highlight the potential of a smartphone e-health application, suggesting 60 min prompts may present an optimal frequency to reduce total occupational sedentary behaviour. Full article
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Article
Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study of the MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes Smartphone App for Reducing Prolonged Sitting Time in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4414; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17124414 - 19 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1336
Abstract
This study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a self-regulation smartphone app for reducing prolonged sitting in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This was a two-arm, randomised, controlled feasibility trial. The intervention group used the MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes smartphone app for 8 weeks. [...] Read more.
This study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a self-regulation smartphone app for reducing prolonged sitting in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This was a two-arm, randomised, controlled feasibility trial. The intervention group used the MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes smartphone app for 8 weeks. The app uses a number of behaviour change techniques aimed at reducing and breaking up sitting time. Eligibility, recruitment, retention, and completion rates for the outcomes (sitting, standing, stepping, and health-related measures) assessed trial feasibility. Interviews with participants explored intervention acceptability. Participants with T2DM were randomised to the control (n = 10) and intervention groups (n = 10). Recruitment and retention rates were 71% and 90%, respectively. The remaining participants provided 100% of data for the study measures. The MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes app was viewed as acceptable for reducing and breaking up sitting time. There were preliminary improvements in the number of breaks in sitting per day, body fat %, glucose tolerance, attitude, intention, planning, wellbeing, and positive and negative affect in favour of the intervention group. In conclusion, the findings indicate that it would be feasible to deliver and evaluate the efficacy of the MyHealthAvatar-Diabetes app for breaking up sitting time and improving health outcomes in a full trial. Full article
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